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Jesus Christ

Associated Archive Content : 228 results

"One Solitary Life"

The document, shown here, contains a narrative describing Jesus, entitled "One Solitary Life." Dr. King would use this narrative, in one of his last and most famous sermons "The Drum Major Instinct." The sermon was delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church, February 4, 1968, exactly two months before his untimely assassination.

A Challenge to the Churches and Synagogues

In this document, Dr. King addressed the Conference on Religion and Race in Chicago, Illinois. He reprimands the Church and Synagogue for being silent or being a "silent partner of the status quo." Dr. King tells them that they must recapture its focus on human rights or risk becoming irrelevant. In closing, Dr. King challenges himself along with these religious institutions to make a choice; either continue to follow the "status quo" or "give ourselves unreservedly to God and his kingdom."

A Knock at Midnight

Dr. King wrote this sermon for the Youth Sunday Services of the Women's Convention Auxiliary National Baptist Convention in Chicago on September 14, 1958. The sermon builds off of a biblical passage from Luke in which a friend visits a neighbor at midnight for three loaves of bread. Correlating the story to the modern world, Dr.

A Perspective for Christian Peace Concern

Brewster Kneen writes about the roles that Christians and the church play in the peace-making process. He cites Saint Peter and Saint Luke to support his argument.

A Religion of Doing

Dr. King delivered this sermon at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church on July 4, 1954. In the sermon, Dr. King asserts the importance of active religion over passive theoretical practice. Citing the Book of Matthew, he maintains that belief and action must be united, as action is the crux of true religion. He proclaims that the church has to be a passage of the "dynamic force" that encourages action of its members.

A Statement to the South and Nation

This seemingly unexceptional document signifies the birth of the SCLC. Dr. King, Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth and Rev. C. K. Steele assembled a consortium of leaders in Atlanta following the end of the Montgomery Bus Boycott. The Southern Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration issued this statement that addresses the intimidation, discrimination and economic disparity Negroes face in the South. The statement appeals to the federal government to intervene against assaults that block basic civil rights.

A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart

"A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart" by Dr. King discusses the importance of creating a synthesis of opposites and characteristics of one engaged in shrewd thinking with a loving spirit.

A Tough Mind and A Tender Heart

This outline to Dr. King's sermon "A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart" focuses on the premise that being a tough minded individual involves making critical decisions. The sermon emphasizes that those who possess a soft mind tend to be gullible and strictly follow the status quo. According to Dr. King, "We must come to the realization that life demands a tough mind."

Address by Dabbs entitled 'Quit You Like Men' Delivered at SCLC

This address to the Fall Session of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference was delivered in October, 1959, by James McBride Dabbs. Dabbs speaks to the social condition in the United States, highlighting the equality of the races. Arguing that justice is a two way street, Dabbs brings up Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom," in which Dr. King defends the Montgomery bus boycott as an essential non-cooperation to show discontent.

Address to the Montgomery Improvement Association

Dr. King discusses the inequality in America and the Montgomery Bus Boycott. He says that he will work to eliminate discrimination in Montgomery and he encourages the audience to participate and actively seek change as well.

Adverse Note to MLK on Political Cartoon

This anonymous critic of Dr. King described their grievances on a political cartoon from The Birmingham News that referred to Dr. King as a hypocrite.

An Order For the Baptism of Adults

Dr. King outlines the order of the baptism service, including specific phrases for the minister to use.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

An anonymous author instructs Dr. King on how he should prepare his people for the end of the world.

Anselm's Theory

Dr. King discusses Catholic theology referencing the theories of Aquinas and Anselm regarding the topic of "sin."

Apostles' Creed

Dr. King outlines the history of the Apostles' Creed and states the creed in its Roman form.

Appeal to Billy Graham Regarding Religion

Matakichi Saito questions Billy Graham about his views on religion as it relates to discrimination.

Arianism

Dr. King writes about Arianism, a view named after Arius of Alexandria. Arianism acknowledges the divinity of God the father and Jesus the son; however, under this doctrine Jesus is subordinate to God.

Barth on Dogmatics

Dr. King examines Karl Barth's view of dogmatics as an act of faith.

Beyond Condemnation

Dr. King outlines a sermon entitled "Beyond Condemnation." He references the biblical story about a woman condemned to death by the Pharisees for adultery. Jesus commands "the person without sin to cast the first stone" as a lesson that all sins are equal and that no one should judge the flaws of others.

Black Power and the American Christ

The Christian Century published this article by historian and civil rights activist Vincent Harding in its June 4, 1967 issue. In the essay, Harding, friend, associate, and speech writer for Dr. King, claims that Eurocentric Christianity antagonized the Black Power Movement.

Bread at Midnight

"The Mennonite," issued by The Board of Education and Publication of the General Conference Mennonite Church, features an article by Dr. King entitled "Bread at Night." Dr. King begins with a parable that demonstrates not only the power of prayer, but provides metaphors for the state of America and thinking material for the role of the church during that time period.

Brunner

Dr. King cites theologian Emil Brunner regarding man's knowledge of God.

Catholic Interracial Council Newsletter Honoring MLK

This 1965 newsletter from the Catholic Interracial Council honors Dr. King with the Pacem in Terris Peace and Freedom Award.

Catholicism

Dr. King references American theologian Niebuhr's ideas regarding Catholicism and quotes, "It pretended that the church could mediate the divine, mercy and judgement without itself standing under that judgement or requiring that mercy." This quotes derives from Niebuhr's book "The Pope's Domesticated God."

Chapter II - The Methodologies of Tillich and Wieman

This is the third chapter of Dr. King's dissertation "A Comparison of the Conception of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman."

Christ

Dr. King quotes Albert Knudson's thoughts about how the disciples viewed Jesus Christ.

Christian

Dr. King defines the Christian personality accroding the John McConnachie.

Conversion

Dr. King quotes Russian novelist Leo Tolstoy's book "What I Believe." Tolstoy asserts that when he came to believe in Christ's teachings his whole life and perception changed.

Cooperative/Noble Competition

Dr. King writes a sermon on the topic "Cooperative Competition." King utilizes the biblical text deriving from Luke chapter 22 verse 24, which expresses how Jesus views competition. According to the text, Jesus thinks that competition is good as long as an individual competes with humility and serving others.

Crozer Theological Seminary Comprehensive Examinations

The following is a detailed overview of comprehensive examinations at the Crozer Theological Seminary in Chester, Pennsylvania. Exams are both written and oral. "The purpose of the oral examination is to discover the student's ability to think in an integrative manner over all the areas of the theological education."

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