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Johnson, Lyndon B. (Lyndon Baines)

b. 1908 - d. 1973

Lyndon Baines Johnson, 36th U.S. president (1908-1973), assumed the presidency after John F. Kennedy’s assassination in 1963. Johnson went on to win the 1964 election, with strong support from Dr. King. Johnson did not seek re-election in 1968, choosing unity over the bitter division surrounding the Vietnam War. Johnson was responsible for passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. He nominated Thurgood Marshall to be the first African American justice on the U.S. Supreme Court. Though cordial, the relationship between Johnson and Dr. King was often strained. King appreciated Johnson’s generally positive position on civil rights, but King’s vocal opposition of the Vietnam War created challenges for the Johnson Administration.

Associated Archive Content : 231 results

Letter from Eulah M. Eubank to MLK

In this letter, Eulah Eubank writes Dr. King regarding the Washington, D.C. Camp-In. She states she is "not...opposed" to marches and sit-ins, but feels that the Camp-In would be counter-productive. She believes it "will ad [sic] fuel to fires the extremists are trying build."

Letter from Frank Meranda to President Johnson

Frank Meranda, chairman of the Boston chapter of CORE, writes President Johnson to point out that job tests for the federal government result in discrimination against minorities.

Letter from Frederic C. Smedley to Lyndon B. Johnson

Frederic C. Smedley, a lawyer and peace activist, writes to President Johnson suggesting a program to help end the war in Vietnam. Smedley urges President Johnson to implement the plan to bring an end to the longstanding fight.

Letter from Frederic C. Smedley to MLK

Frederic C. Smedley, a lawyer and peace activist, writes to Dr. King regarding the 1968 election. He argues against Dr. King's picks for the best potential Republican and Democrat presidential candidates, saying that Vice President Humphrey would have a good chance at the White House if he were to publicly break with President Johnson over the Vietnam War.

Letter from Frederic C. Smedley to MLK

Frederic C. Smedley, a lawyer and peace activists, presents Dr. King with a proposed plan aimed at applying pressure on President Johnson and other political leaders to end the war in Vietnam. The plan includes such actions as bombarding Congress with letters, demanding that President Johnson resign, and urging Republicans to nominate a ticket with candidates in support of an anti-Vietnam war policy. If none of the suggestions are effective, Smedley encourages a push for an independent ticket.

Letter from Gene Young to Joan Daves

Gene Young of Harper and Row Publishing sends this letter to Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent. He explains that he is waiting to send out promotional copies of Dr. King's most recent book, "Where Do We Go From Here," until after he receives a list of who Dr. King and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference have already sent copies. He attaches a list of those sent copies of Dr. King's last book so that they might use it as a checklist, including President Johnson, Vice President Humphrey, Robert F. Kennedy, and Dr.

Letter from George W. Monroe to President Johnson

A former employee of the US Naval Air Station in Jacksonville, Florida, George Monroe, writes again to President Johnson regarding an injury he received and the discrimination he was met with in trying to receive his sick pay and disability benefits. President Johnson had given Monroe's complaint to the Commanding Officer of the USNA in Jacksonville, however, Monroe was still facing difficulty getting help and wrote again to President Johnson to ask for his help. Dr.

Letter from H. Ladd Plumley to MLK

H. Ladd Plumley, the Chairman of the National Emergency Committee of the National Council on Crime and Delinquency, writes to Dr. King to inform him that President Jonson asked them to spearhead a citizen-action program to fight crime. In response to these requests, they are planning on holding a conference and hoped the Southern Christian Leadership Conference would appear and be listed as a co-sponsor of the event.

Letter from Harry Daniels to President Johnson

Harry Daniels sends a copy of his letter to President Johnson to Dr. King, granting him permission to reprint it in his publications. In the letter, Daniels urges that in order to advance the freedom and equality of the United States, we must end poverty.

Letter from Harry Wachtel to Premier Kosygin and President Johnson

Civil rights activist Harry Wachtel tells Soviet Premier Kosygin and President Lyndon Johnson that the world community depends on their solutions to crucial problems. He charges President Johnson with ending bombing in Vietnam and he charges Premier Kosygin with influencing Vietnam towards peaceful negotiations. Lastly, he asks both leaders to help eliminate war and poverty in the Middle East.

Letter from Hazel Olivier to MLK

Hazel H. Olivier of Chicago, in a letter dated February 1, 1966, asks Dr. King to help her retain an apartment building on Yale Avenue that she purchased in 1957. She lived there 5 years before being told there were serious violations. Three years after spending substantial funds and being informed by the inspector that everything was in compliance, she was cited with additional violations and told there were no reports of her earlier remedial actions. She wonders how the previous white owner was permitted to sell if there were violations. Mrs.

Letter from Helen Harrington to MLK with Poems

Helen Harrington writes to Dr. King to offer him the use of her poems in his writing and speeches. The poems, attached, are entitled 'Color Book,' 'Viet Nam,' and 'Two Prisons.' In a post script, Harrington urges Dr. King to run for president on an independent ticket, provided a peace candidate is not nominated by the Republican or Democratic parties, adding that she wants no more of President Johnson.

Letter from Henry S. Huntington Expressing Concerned About Vietnam

Huntington expresses deep concern regarding the Vietnam War. Huntington believes that humor and ridicule is a weapon against the war that is being used too little. He urges Dr. King and his supporters to each send a message to the president, and also write a letter to the local paper asking peace-lovers to state a message ridiculing President Johnson. In conclusion, Huntington hopes to gain other peace organizations to join in the Ridicule For Johnson Movement.

Letter from Imogene Cashmore to President Johnson

Imogene Cashmore responds to Senator Dodd's recent statement in Congress about Moise Tshombe, a Congo politician who had recently been jailed on charges of treason. Cashmore condemns Senators Robert and Ted Kennedy for not trying to help Tshombe, questioning why there has been no negative response to the current government of Congo, which Cashmore charges is rampant with "mass murder and violation of civil rights."

Letter from James D. Wyker to MLK

James D. Wyker writes this letter to Dr. King and encloses his proposal for direct action against the Vietnam War. Wyker questions if 60% of the population really supports President Johnson's actions in Vietnam, implying that many citizens are just neutral and not wanting to fight the status quo.

Letter from James R. Herrington to MLK

James R. Herrington wrote this adverse letter to Dr. King, calling both him and his doctrine of civil disobedience "trash." Herrington ends his letter by saying that President Johnson cared more for Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement than the rest of the country, and therefore, won't be president again.

Letter from Jimmie Johnson to MLK

Jimmie Johnson writes to Dr. King to say that while he is a Negro, he does not believe in integration. Johnson does not think there will ever be enough jobs in America for Negroes, and therefore argues for segregation. He asks Dr. King to share this view in his upcoming meeting with President Johnson.

Letter from John Huston to MLK

Reverend John Huston of the East View United Church of Christ writes to Dr. King to express his appreciation for Operation Breadbasket. Huston calls this the most effective civil rights initiative he's ever had the pleasure of working on. He brings up three points that he would like to discuss with Dr. King, including how to better advocate for the Negroes' federally guaranteed rights.

Letter from June Parker to MLK

June Parker writes to Dr. King with much hesitation, stating that what she is going to say has been on her heart for a long time. Parker writes that she believes Negroes, such as herself, must be free in all aspects of life and not just a few areas. She writes she is not a fan of Dr. King's urging to vote Democrat, and alleges that the Democratic Party gave Dr. King $50,000 for his support. She further states Democrats are just getting their friends to be millionaires while slaughtering young men in their prime.

Letter from Katharine Gunning to President Johnson

Katharine Gunning of New York writes President Johnson and copies various dignitaries, including Dr. King. Gunning voices her opposition to the Vietnam War, in particular the bombing campaign, which she views as an escalation of the war.

Letter from Kathleen Reid to MLK

Kathleen Reed, the editor of Alert Catholic, writes to Dr. King enclosing the most recent copy of the publication. The Newsletter of the National Council of Catholic Men features a quote by Dr. King to President Johnson which stated "the conditions which you so bravely set out to remedy when you entered office" have not changed.

Letter from Kenneth B. Keating to MLK

Kenneth B. Keating, the Chairman of the Population Crisis Committee, invited Dr. King to join the committee. The organization seeks to help deal with the growing population and ever scarcer resources.

Letter from Laura Taylor to MLK

A supporter writes Dr. King to commend his work in the anti-war movement. The author also tells Dr. King that she writes President Johnson and other legislators regularly on the topic, and references a series of letters she sent on the recent Mother's Day holiday.

Letter from Lee Tishler to MLK

Ms. Lee Tishler gives support and praise to Dr. King for speaking out against the conflict in Vietnam.

Letter from Luther Hodges to MLK Regarding the Civil Rights Act of 1964

The U.S. Secretary of Commerce, Luther Hodges, sent this letter to Dr. King on the eve of the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. He writes that he, King, and President Johnson share enthusiasm over the bill and are positive for the future of America. Hodges asks for Dr. King's continued aid in leading the nation to comply with the bill and, in the words of President Johnson, "eliminate the final strongholds of intolerance and hatred."

Letter from Lyndon B. Johnson to MLK

President Lyndon B. Johnson writes Dr. King, thanking him for sending him an advance copy of "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from M. Carl Holman Regarding Equal Education Opportunity Conference

M. Carl Holman, the Director of the Equal Educational Opportunity in America's Cities, a conference of the United States Commission on Civil Rights, writes to the conference partic-ipants, Dr. King included. Carl Holman writes that this conference was specifically requested by President Johnson following the Commission's report on racial isolation in public schools.

Letter from Marlyn Roach to MLK

Marlyn Roach requests an interview in hopes of a job with SCLC, as she is disillusioned with the antipoverty programs on which she has been working. She cites the cause of the "total failure" of the program to be the difference between the Negroes' and the state and federal government's objectives.

Letter from Martin Segal to MLK

Martin Segal, the Dinner Chairman of the National Urban League, writes to Dr. King asking him to attend the NUL's Equal Opportunity Dinner and accept membership on the dinner's honorary committee. Writing by Dorothy Cotton, Dr. King's assistant, appears at the top right, stating this was the same day that Dr. King would be attending President Johnson's White House Conference in Washington, D.C.

Letter from Martin Shepard to MLK with Citizens For Kennedy/Fulbright Pamphflet

Dr. Martin Shepard, co-chairman of Citizens for Kennedy/Fullbright 1968, wrote this letter to Dr. King after reading the Dr. King felt Robert F. Kennedy would be the best Democratic Presidential nominee in 1968. Dr. Shepard writes that they "share the same feelings about President Johnsons and his insane war in Vietnam" and encourages Dr. King to read the enclosed pamphlet and join their efforts.

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