Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Johnson, Lyndon B. (Lyndon Baines)

b. 1908 - d. 1973

Lyndon Baines Johnson, 36th U.S. president (1908-1973), assumed the presidency after John F. Kennedy’s assassination in 1963. Johnson went on to win the 1964 election, with strong support from Dr. King. Johnson did not seek re-election in 1968, choosing unity over the bitter division surrounding the Vietnam War. Johnson was responsible for passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. He nominated Thurgood Marshall to be the first African American justice on the U.S. Supreme Court. Though cordial, the relationship between Johnson and Dr. King was often strained. King appreciated Johnson’s generally positive position on civil rights, but King’s vocal opposition of the Vietnam War created challenges for the Johnson Administration.

Associated Archive Content : 231 results

Speech at NAACP World March Toward Human Rights Luncheon

Dr. King links the quest for individual civil rights to the global struggle for human rights and states that the nation that will achieve preeminence in the world is the one that both guarantees human rights for all and provides for basic needs.

Speech in Jackson, Mississippi

Dr. King addresses supporters in Jackson, Mississippi during his statewide tour for the 1968 Poor People's Campaign. He speaks of his excitement about the number of blacks in Mississippi that participated in the last congressional election. He emphasizes that the Poor People's Campaign cannot be successful without a strong coalition of organizations that see the need to combat poverty. King would be assassinated in Memphis two weeks after making this speech.

Speech to SCLC Convention about Vietnam

Dr. King makes one of his first public statements opposing the war in Vietnam during the SCLC Convention held in Birmingham. According to King, "Neither the American people nor the people of North Vietnam is the enemy. The true enemy is war itself, and people on both sides are trapped in its inexorable destruction."

Speech to the American Psychological Association

In this speech on the 75th anniversary of the American Psychological Association, Dr. King acknowledges the help that social science can have in the quest of Negroes for equality. He identifies three areas for study: Negro leadership, the efficacy of political action, and the psychological and ideological changes taking place in Negroes as a result of a decade of struggle.

Speech to the Synagogue Council of America

Dr. King receives the Judaism and World Peace Award from the Synagogue Council of America and uses the occasion to speak about the Civil Rights Movement and international peace. He laments the vehement criticism of dissent and discussion of the Vietnam War and enumerates reasons why the Hebrew prophets are so needed today.

Spring Mobilization Committee Roundup of Nationwide Mobilization Activity

This document outlines activities around the country leading up to the April 15 Spring Mobilization Against the War in Vietnam rally in New York City.

St. Augustine, Florida: 400 Years of Bigotry and Hate

The SCLC compiled and published this pamphlet about St. Augustine, Florida, describing a long history of racial discrimination and segregation supported by Northern tourism.

Statement from Jack Wood Jr. to the National Association of Housing Cooperatives

Wood commends President Johnson for his call for a Fair Housing Act and the Demonstration Cities Act of 1966 that would provide funds for rehabilitation of urban ghettoes. However, he laments the fact that they are separate bills and the government is accepting applications for the Demonstration Cities program absent a Fair Housing Act.

Statement on Nobel and Catholic Interracial Council Awards

John A. McDermott, Executive Director of the Catholic Interracial Council, lauds Dr. King's receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize and announces that the Council is awarding King its John F. Kennedy Award.

Summary of 1968 Harris Survey Results

This document summarizes the most recent Harris Surveys from 1968, reporting how the American people feel about President Johnson. Topics focused on include the War on Poverty, Vietnam, and Congress.

Telegram from American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa to President Johnson

Members of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa express their disapproval of South Africa's rule over South West Africa and ask for U.S. intervention.

Telegram from George Houser to MLK

George Houser of the American Committee on Africa urges Dr. King to telegram the President about Rhodesia's unilateral declaration of independence. The Rhodesian government, under Prime Minister Ian Smith, took this illegal action to break from the United Kingdom after days of negotiation with British Prime Minister Harold Wilson. The British sought to give blacks a fair share of power.

Telegram from Hosea Williams to President Johnson

Hosea Williams writes to President Lyndon B. Johnson requesting an investigation of the Andy Whatley murder.

Telegram from James S. Symington to MLK

James S. Symington of the U.S. Department of State invites Dr. King to meet with Prime Minister Forbes Burham of Guyana. Symington provides Dr. King with the Prime Minister's itinerary for California and Texas.

Telegram from Lawrence F. O'Brien to MLK

Lawrence O'Brien, Special Assistant to President Johnson, invites Dr. King to the signing of the Voting Rights Act in Washington, D.C.

Telegram from Mike Bibler to MLK

Mike Bibler contends that "our lame duck president" can "do more for black people than any other man in history." This telegram was sent following President Johnson's announcement that he would not seek re-election.

Telegram from MLK to Attorney General Robert Kennedy

Dr. King sends Attorney General Robert Kennedy a copy of the telegram he sent to Vice President Lyndon Johnson. The city of St. Augustine, Florida refuses to desegregate its facilities, which Dr. King describes as a "denial of Negro citizenship."

Telegram from MLK to President Johnson about Howard Address

Dr. King writes to President Lyndon B. Johnson expressing appreciation and admiration for his speech at the Howard University Commencement.

Telegram from MLK to President Johnson about VISTA Director

Dr. King writes President Johnson recommending that Dr. Maurice Dawkins become the new director of VISTA.

Telegram from MLK to President Johnson Excerpt

Dr. King writes President Johnson about the issues Negroes are facing in Mississippi, where they were being denied the right to vote. King calls Johnson's attention to the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, which was engaged in a struggle for representation against the National Democratic Party as well as the political network of Mississippi.

Telegram from MLK to President Johnson on Home Rule

Dr. King urges President Johnson to support the administration bill on Home Rule for Washington, D.C. rather than pursue a compromise.

Telegram from MLK to President Johnson on Rhodesia

Dr. King urges President Johnson to respond to the unilateral declaration of independence by Prime Minister Ian Smith of Rhodesia by withdrawing American officials, refusing diplomatic recognition and severing economic ties.

Telegram from MLK to President Johnson on State of the Union Address

Dr. King praises President Johnson for his State of the Union address. King expresses appreciation for Johnson's continued commitment to the Great Society, his call for legislation to protect those pursuing their constitutional rights and his pledge to work diligently to end the Vietnam War.

Telegram from MLK to President Lyndon B. Johnson

Dr. King urges President Lyndon B. Johnson to conduct a full investigation concerning the government's involvement with Medgar Evers' suspected murderer.

Telegram from President Johnson to Bernard Lee

Dr. King's special assistant, Bernard Lee, was the recipient of this telegram requesting his presence at a White House conference called by President Johnson. The theme of the conference was "To Fulfill These Rights."

Telegram from President Johnson to MLK

President Lyndon B. Johnson writes to Dr. King sympathizing with his concern over the incidents that occurred in Philadelphia, Mississippi. King was continuing the March Against Fear of James Meredith, who was shot by a sniper on June 6. A rally in Philadelphia commemorating the murder two years earlier of three civil rights activists was angrily attacked by a white mob. Homes of blacks were later sprayed with gunfire.

Telegram from Rev. Ralph Abernathy to President Johnson

Rev. Abernathy urges President Johnson to meet with a group of poverty-stricken people from Syracuse, New York at Johnson's Texas White House.

Telegram to MLK from Truman B. Douglass

Truman B. Douglass, the chairman of the National Citizens Committee for the Child Development Group of Mississippi (CDGM), informs Dr. King that he has appealed to President Johnson for a meeting regarding the funding of CDGM.

The Dilemma of White America

This early draft of the Racism and the White Backlash chapter of Dr. King's Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community? explores the history and philosophy of white supremacy. King insists the current status of Negroes is the direct result of oppression by whites, who have developed delusional beliefs to justify their historic acts of colonization and slavery.

The Influence of the Right and Left in the Civil Rights Movement

Activist Bayard Rustin prepared these remarks for the Negro Leadership Conference in New York in January 1965. He discusses the influence of the American right, the traditional Communist left and the unaffiliated left (the Thirties veterans and the spontaneous left of Harlem and Mississippi).

Pages