Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Katzenbach, Nicholas deB. (Nicholas deBelleville)

b. 1922 - d. 2012

Nicholas deBelleville Katzenbach was deputy U.S. attorney general in the Kennedy administration from 1962-1965. President Lyndon Johnson appointed him attorney general after the resignation of Robert F. Kennedy in 1965. As deputy and attorney general, Katzenbach was one of the key players orchestrating the federal government’s response to the Civil Rights Movement. He flew to Alabama to confront George Wallace to ensure the desegregation of the University of Alabama and the enrollment of Vivian Malone and James Hood. He often corresponded with Dr. King about the concerns of the president and the Justice Department and responded to King’s requests for federal intervention. Katzenbach was appointed under secretary of state in 1966 and was preoccupied with the Vietnam War before leaving government at the end of the Johnson administration in 1969.

Associated Archive Content : 15 results

Lette from Morton Sobell to a Friend

Mrs. Sobell requests that Dr. King attend the open hearing for Morton Sobell. She also asks for financial support to aid in his defense.

Letter from Curtis Cosby to MLK

Curtis Cosby, writing on behalf of the Esquires Club, encourages Dr. King to support attorney Donald Hollowell as the replacement for judge Boyd Sloan in order to place a Negro in a high level federal position.

Letter from Curtis W. Harris to US Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach

Curtis W. Harris demands that the United States Justice Department intervene in Virginia's school systems to prevent discrimination in how tax funds are used for public education. Mr. Harris reports that Negroes continue to be excluded from serving on local school boards and this exclusion "constitutes discrimination and is a violation of Federal law."

Letter from Grandison Cherry-El to MLK

Grandison Cherry-El, Minister with The Moorish Science Temple of America, contacts US Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbak in reference to discrimination in citizenship in American public schools.

Letter from Nicholas Katzenbach to MLK

U.S. Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach writes to Dr. King acknowledging his suggestion of using the Greenville Air Force Base to help alleviate the economic problems of Negro families in the Mississippi Delta. Katzenbach states that most of the land is no longer leased by the U.S. government but that Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1965 would apply to any educational programs.

Letter from Nicholas Katzenbach to MLK

Letter from Robert Green to US Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach

SCLC Education Director Robert Green writes Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach requesting a federal intervention on discrimination practices in Mississippi. Green complains that members of SCLC, SNCC, CORE and other organizations were denied access to restrooms during the 1966 James Meredith March Against Fear.

Letter from William Ryan to MLK

William Ryan, member of Congress writes Dr. King after he and other members of Congress were able to visit Selma. After witnessing the conditions at hand, they have been urged to break the barrier on the right to vote.

MLK Requests Federal Protection from US Attorney General

Dr. King sends this urgent request for protection to US Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach. Negro citizens were brutalized while protesting the arrest of James Orange. Alabama State Troopers prevented protestors from seeking medical attention by refusing to allow them to leave Zion Methodist Church.

Questions and Answers on the Civil Rights Act of 1967

This document contains questions and answers on the proposed Civil Rights Act of 1967 regarding federal and state jury trials, equal employment, fair housing, protection against interference with constitutional rights, and extending the life of the civil rights commission.

SCLC Resolution "To Fulfill These Rights"

The SCLC releases a copy of the resolution, "To Fulfill These Rights," created by the SCLC's Alabama staff and sent to the White House Conference. Hosea Williams states in the resolution that Negroes who voted in the primary were intimidated by white segregationist to not vote in the run-off.

Support from Lawyer Grenville Clark to Attorney General Nicholas Kstzenbech

In this letter to U.S. Attorney General Nicholas Kstzenbech, Grenville Clark requests a reply to Dr. King's "devastating" public statement in the New York Times about proper enforcement of the 1965 voting rights law.

Telegram Called in From Attorney General Nicholas Deb Katzenbach to MLK

Katzenbach responds to an urgent telegram from Dr. King concerning State Troopers that had trapped Demonstrators inside a church and refused to let them obtain medical attention. Katzenbach tells Dr. King that he is aware of the situation and that the Department Attorneys and the FBI were already on the scene in both Selma and Marion and investigations had already begun.

Telegram from MLK to US Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach

Dr. King writes US Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach to inform him of the reports of "known election irregularities" he is receiving concerning the next day's Georgia Democratic primary election.

Telegram from MLK to US Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach

Dr. King asks Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach for an investigation of voter irregularities in the Georgia Democratic primary election.