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Kennedy, Robert F.

b. 1925 - d. 1968

Robert F. Kennedy was U.S. attorney general (1961-1964) during the presidencies of his brother John Kennedy and Lyndon Johnson. His commitment to civil rights grew over time. Dr. King pushed Kennedy to enforce federal statutes against discrimination and repeatedly sought federal intervention to curb violence against civil rights protestors. Kennedy authorized the wiretapping of King’s home and office because of his affiliation with Stanley Levison. After his brother’s assassination, Kennedy helped Johnson craft the 1964 Civil Rights Act. Elected to the U.S. Senate in 1964, he championed civil and economic rights. Kennedy entered the 1968 presidential race and gave an impassioned plea for racial reconciliation after King’s assassination. Two months later, on June 5, Kennedy was murdered in San Francisco.

Associated Archive Content : 101 results

Telegram from MLK to Senator Robert Kennedy

Dr. King requests that Senator Robert Kennedy initiate an investigation into complaints about the actions of police during demonstrations in Petersburg, Virginia.

Telegram from Robert F. Kennedy to SCLC

On the occasion of SCLC’s Annual Convention, Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy states that the country has made great strides toward the realization of SCLC’s goal of assuring the rights of citizenship to all. The Department of Justice has acted and will continue to act to protect the right to vote.

Telegram from Robert F. Kennedy to Wyatt Tee Walker

Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy writes to Wyatt Tee Walker regarding the progress of the SCLC. Kennedy believes that the right to vote will eliminate "continued discrimination and injustice."

Telegram Text from MLK to USAG Robert Kennedy

Dr. King requests that Attorney General Robert Kennedy intervene in New Orleans to prevent further intimidation of civil rights supporters by police.

Telegrams from MLK to the Kennedys

Dr. King informs President John F. Kennedy and Attorney General Robert Kennedy of the bombings and police behavior in Birmingham, Alabama. Dr. King suggests that if desegregation does not occur the city will experience a "racial holocaust."

The Klansman Article Regarding MLK

This article on Dr. King appears in "The Klansman," a publication of the White Knights of the Ku Klux Klan of Mississippi. Dr. King, who is here referred to as the "Reverend Riot Inciter" and "Riot King," is alleged to have caused civil unrest in Leflore County and Greenwood, Mississippi.

The Negro In America: What Must Be Done

In a full page of letters to the editor, civil rights advocates praise the Newsweek cover issue on the Negro in America for its analysis of the racial crisis and editorial recommendations for an emergency national program of action.

The New York Herald Tribune Articles Concerning Vietnam

These copies of several news articles denounce United States military involvement in the Vietnam War.
The New York Herald Tribune claims the there is no formal program to inform the public about what is happening in Vietnam.
The Nation claims that the United States Army is being used to bolster a brutal dictatorship in an undeclared war.
The Washington Star carried an Associated Press report on children with napalm burns.

The New York Times: New Way Sought to Teach Rights

Columbia University and its Teachers College plan to begin a nationwide initiative to improve the teaching of civil rights. The plan will not only apply to elementary and secondary schools but also to college, universities and adult education forums. Instead of using textbooks, teachers will utilize case studies and films to keep information up to date.

TV: Return of Susskind

This article reviews a series of television shows that aired on various networks dealing with politics and race relations. Among the programs mentioned is a segment featuring Senator Kennedy as well as a documentary entitled "The Agony of Two Cities" centered on segregation.

White Backlash Growing

The intensity in the Civil Rights Movement increased as blacks remained segregated and the Black Power movement gained popularity. White backlash increased during these times, but Dr. King noted that demonstrations "did not breed hate, but only revealed hatred that already existed."

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