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King, Coretta Scott

b. 1927 - d. 2006

Daughter of Obadiah and Bernice Scott, Coretta Scott King was the wife of Dr. King and founded the Martin Luther King, Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change in Atlanta. An accomplished musician, she graduated from New England Conservatory of Music after studying at Antioch College. Meeting and courting in Boston, Coretta and Martin married on June 8, 1953 and relocated to Montgomery, Alabama when Martin became pastor of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church. They returned to Atlanta and Dr. King’s home church, Ebenezer Baptist, for the wider work of the movement. A deeply committed civil rights and peace activist herself, Mrs. King primarily reared their four children. Her decades-long effort finally materialized in legislation setting her late husband’s birthday as a federal holiday in 1986. She died in 2006 on January 30.

Associated Archive Content : 367 results

Letter from Darnell Garner to Mrs. King

Darnell Garner offers condolences to Mrs. King following Dr. King's death, and he invites her to a mass at his church

Letter from David Morgan to Mrs. King

David Morgan writes this letter of condolence to Coretta Scott King following Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from Dean Florio to Mrs. King

Dean Florio sends condolences to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from Debbie Rubiano to Mrs. King

This handwritten letter was written the day after Dr. King's assassination and is addressed to Mrs. King.

Letter from Dennis Askey to Dora McDonald Regarding Nobel Peace Prize

Dennis Askey from the United States Information Agency sends Dora McDonald a detailed itinerary of the award ceremony for the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter From Don Rothenberg of Ramparts to MLK

Don Rothenberg, the Assistant to the Publisher of Ramparts Magazine, sent this letter to Dr. and Mrs. King with an advance copy of the January issue. The magazine, which was associated with the New Left, reported on the napalming of Vietnamese children in the war. Upon reading this, Dr. King was moved to become more vocal against the Vietnam War, which he later did, starting in April of 1967 with his "Beyond Vietnam" speech.

Letter from Donald Keys to MLK

Donald F. Keys writes to Dr. King about Dr. King's invitation to speak at a planned Washington Mobilization on Vietnam. Keys also tells Dr. King that he may have to go to Africa at the time of the meeting, and requests that Mrs. King deliver his address in his absence.

Letter from Donald Prince to Mrs. King

Donald Prince wrote this letter the day after Dr. King's assassination and addressed it to Mrs. King.

Letter from Dora McDonald to James McKee Concerning Antioch College Visit

Dora McDonald writes James McKee regarding the time of Dr. and Mrs. King's arrival and security arrangements for Dr. King's appearance at Antioch College.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Otto Fuerbringer of Time Magazine

Dora McDonald inquires about receiving additional copies of the Time Magazine issue that featured Dr. King as the Man of the Year. She informs Otto Fuerbringer that Mrs. King's relatives in her hometown of Marion, Alabama were unable to buy copies of the magazine.

Letter from Dorothy Height to Dr. and Mrs. King

Noted civil rights leader and women's activist Dorothy Height invites Dr. and Mrs. King to be special guests at the National Council of Negro Women's Life Membership Dinner. The event is also set to honor union leaders A. Philip Randolph, Walter Reuther and Mrs. Arthur Goldberg. Singer Lena Horne serves as a co-host to the dinner.

Letter from Dottie Hughes to Dr. and Mrs. King

Mrs. Hughes, a resident of Zambia, congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. She informs Dr. and Mrs. King that their efforts are being recognized in Africa.

Letter from Dow Kirkpatrick to MLK

Dow Kirkpatrick, Pastor of First Methodist Church in Evanston, Illinois, invites Dr. King to dinner during his visit to Evanston.

Letter from Dr. Benjamin E. Mays to Dr. and Mrs. King

Benjamin E. Mays invites Dr. and Mrs. King to the Founder's Day Banquet at Morehouse College.

Letter from Duncan Wood to MLK

This letter outlines Dr. King's upcoming trip to Moscow. The purpose of the mission is to have past Nobel Peace Prize winners partake in an initiative to promote peace in Vietnam.

Letter From E. Spencer Parsons to MLK

E. Spencer Parsons, Dean of the Rockefeller Memorial Chapel at the University of Chicago, invites Dr. King to preach at a university religious service. He also commends him for the leadership he has provided Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam.

Letter from Edmund Stinnes to MLK

Edmund Stinnes reports a recent visit with his and Dr. King's mutual friends Asha Devi and Dr. E. W. Aryanayakam along with news about other acquaintances. He also shares his excitement about an upcoming meeting with Dr. King. He closes by inviting Dr. and Mrs. King to vacation at his farm in Brazil.

Letter from Edna R. McKinnon to MLK

Edna McKinnon praises Dr. King for his wonderful work with the SCLC and its effect on the "entire world." She agrees with Dr. King's nonviolent philosophy and approach to American military intervention in Vietnam. Ms. McKinnon is the sister of Jeanette Rankin, the first woman of Congress, and the only member to vote against U.S. entry into both world wars.

Letter from Edward Kennedy to MLK

Edward Kennedy thanks Dr. and Mrs. King for their hospitality during the Annual Convention of the SCLC.

Letter from Edward Kirsch to Coretta Scott King

Edward Kirsch, Executive Director of The Bronx-Lebanon Hospital Center extends warmest sympathies to Mrs. King during her time of bereavement. He writes, "Dr. King was greatly admired by all of us as an inspiring leader, a true humanitarian and an advocate of peace and justice for all people."

Letter from Eileen Coyne to Mrs. King

Second grader Eileen Coyne sends condolences to the King family. She and her classmates were instructed to write letters to Mrs. King to express their feelings following Dr. King's assassination. This document is a part of a collection of sixteen letters from this Bronx, New York classroom.

Letter from Emily Barton Arrabee to MLK

Ms. Arrabee sends a check to Dr. King not for the SCLC, but for Dr. and Mrs. King to use to treat themselves in some way. Arrabee suggests a book, a new record or dinner together. The check is a token of her respect and admiration for both Dr. and Mrs. King.

Letter from Eugene G. Huston to Ralph Abernathy

Mr. Huston writes to request that the photos of Mrs. King and her daughter which appear on the cover of Life Magazine, April 1968 be widely distributed. Huston believes that if this is done the larger public will be just as moved as he was and further serve to promote the memory of Dr. King.

Letter from Eunice Johnson to Coretta Scott King

Eunice Johnson, an African woman born in America but now living in Nigeria, writes Mrs. King in hopes of being able to meet her during her visit to America. She hopes that they can discuss Dr. King's nonviolent campaign.

Letter from Fran to Dr. & Mrs. King

Fran writes Dr. and Mrs. King to thank them for their hospitality during her stay at their home.

Letter from Frank J. Pastor to Mrs. King

This letter from Frank Pastor was written to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King’s assassination.

Letter from Freddye Henderson of Henderson Travel to Dora McDonald

Freddye Henderson encloses information regarding flight schedules, rates for transportation, and suggested hotels for Dr. King's trip to Oslo, Norway.

Letter from Gayle E. Talley to Mr. & Mrs. King

Talley, Credit Manager of the Sheraton-Lincoln Hotel, writes to Mr. & Mrs. King concerning a financial matter. She requests any information regarding the whereabouts of a fellow colleague, Rev. O. L. Holliday.

Letter from Gene Riley to MLK

Gene Riley writes Coretta Scott King requesting that she contribute to a spring planting project.

Letter from George Fedak to Mrs. King

George Fedak writes Mrs. King to express his sympathy for Dr. King's death.

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