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King, Coretta Scott

b. 1927 - d. 2006

Daughter of Obadiah and Bernice Scott, Coretta Scott King was the wife of Dr. King and founded the Martin Luther King, Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change in Atlanta. An accomplished musician, she graduated from New England Conservatory of Music after studying at Antioch College. Meeting and courting in Boston, Coretta and Martin married on June 8, 1953 and relocated to Montgomery, Alabama when Martin became pastor of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church. They returned to Atlanta and Dr. King’s home church, Ebenezer Baptist, for the wider work of the movement. A deeply committed civil rights and peace activist herself, Mrs. King primarily reared their four children. Her decades-long effort finally materialized in legislation setting her late husband’s birthday as a federal holiday in 1986. She died in 2006 on January 30.

Associated Archive Content : 367 results

Letter from Mercedes L. Johnson to Coretta Scott King

Nine year old Mercedes Lynne Johnson writes Mrs. King to offer her condolences and prayers following the assassination of Dr. King.

Letter from Minerva Moreno to Mrs. King

Minerva Moreno, a New York City student, offers her sympathy to Mrs. King following Dr. King's death.

Letter from MLK to Ambassador Adlai Stevenson

Dr. King thanks Adlai Stevenson, America's ambassador to the UN, for sponsoring a reception in his honor following his trip to Oslo to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. He commends Stevenson on his dedication to promote peace and reason in helping to solve world problems.

Letter from MLK to Ann Patricia Herring

Dr. King congratulates Ann Herring on her new marriage and apologizes for misfiling her earlier letters asking him to perform her marriage ceremony. He assures her that if he had seen her letters, he would have made his best attempt to perform the ceremony.

Letter from MLK to Anna Frank

Dr. King informs Mrs. Frank, assistant to Dr. Chalmers, of his travel arrangements to New York where he is set to speak at the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund dinner.

Letter from MLK to C. B. King

Dr. King thanks C. B. King for a recent contribution and tells him that the widespread, articulate opposition to the war in Vietnam is unprecedented in American history.

Letter from MLK to Coretta Scott King

In an intimate letter to Mrs. King, Dr. King informs her of his recent arrival to the State Prison in Reidsville, Georgia. He urges her "to be strong in faith" as she is also pregnant with their third child at the time. He expresses his hope for a family visit that coming Sunday, and his desire to remain intellectually engaged during his four-month sentence.

Letter from MLK to Ellis Pinkston

Dr. King expresses his gratitude to Mrs. Ellis Pinkston for her support. He also extends gratitude on behalf of Mrs. King.

Letter from MLK to Hobson R. Reynolds

Dr. King responds to an invitation from earlier in the year Hobson R. Reynolds. King states that because he is out of town frequently and receives a lot of incoming and outgoing mail sometimes letters are placed in the wrong place. King reference to a trip to Africa that he planned to visit, but was cancelled because of Watts riots in California. King thanks Mr. Reynolds for his contributions to the SCLC and says that he wishes to serve him in the future.

Letter from MLK to Jessie Treichler

Dr. King writes Jessie Tresichler to inform her that he and his wife will be unable to accept her invitation to Antioch College. He explains that his calendar will not allow him to accept any more speaking engagements and that Coretta is an expecting mother.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Richard Russell

Dr. King conveys his well wishes to Mr. Russell for a speedy recovery.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Sidney Williams

On behalf of the King family and the SCLC, Dr. King writes to Mr. Sidney Williams to express his appreciation for Williams' generous contribution and continuous support.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Marian S. Dockhorn

Dr. King responds to Mrs. Marian S. Deckhorn's letter concerning the invitation extended to him and Coretta Scott King for the Bucks Count World Peace Fair. Dr. King notifies Mrs. Deckhorn that they will be unable to attend on the suggested date due to his international travel to Berlin.

Letter from MLK to Nelson A. Rockefeller

Dr. King thanks Governor Nelson Rockefeller for taking the pulpit at Ebenezer Baptist Church for their Men?s Day Observance. He appreciates the Governor?s contribution of $25,000 to their tax exempt Society to match his own donation from the Nobel Peace Award.

Letter from MLK to Vincenso Lapiccirella

Dr. King thanks Dr. Lapiccirella for his invitation to participate in a program in Florence, Italy.

Letter from Mose Pleasure, Jr. to MLK

Mr. Pleasure writes Dr. King to inform him of his decision not to accept employment with SCLC. He refers to an earlier visit with Dr. King and friends in Atlanta, and comments that the group's enthusiasm bodes well for the upcoming Poor People's March on Washington.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Robinson to Rev. Abernathy

Mr. and Mrs. Robinson send a sermon to Reverend Abernathy and his followers hoping to encourage them on their difficult days ahead.

Letter from Mr. Joseph Mermel to Coretta Scott King

In this letter to Mrs. King, Mr. Mermel informs her that a sculptress, Sally Stengel, would like to make a sculpture of Dr. King, given he is one of "two outstanding leaders of the Negro race."

Letter from Mrs. Cyrus Eaton to MLK

In this letter, Mrs. Eaton wrote this letter praising Dr. King for his remarks on Face the Nation. Mrs. Eaton states that Dr. King is indebted to him for always voicing his wisdom.

Letter from Mrs. Elizabeth Sherrill to MLK

Mrs. Sherrill informs Dr. King of a young man, Mr. Jerry Peace, from her church, St. Mark's, who shows great promise as a poet. She encourages Dr. King to reach out to Mr. Peace to help direct his "rather anger energy" into a new direction.

Letter from Mrs. Forest Dana to MLK

Mrs. Forest Dana writes Dr. King to express her displeasure in his outspoken stance against the Vietnam War. She acknowledges the withdrawal of her support and feels that he has done a disservice to Negroes in America. She believes he should focus on civil rights and not interfere with the war.

Letter from Mrs. George E. Bass to MLK

The President of the Planned Parenthood Association of Philadelphia expresses disappointment to Dr. King regarding his inability to personally accept the Margret Sanger Award in Human Rights. However, she states that Mrs. King was "a most eloquent substitute." Additionally, she reiterates a request for Dr. King to speak at the Philadelphia Planned Parenthood Association's Annual Luncheon on January 25, 1967.

Letter from Mrs. Joan Kimmey to Coretta Scott King

On behalf of the Baha'is in Teaneck, New Jersey, this letter offers condolences to Mrs. King for the recent assassination of her husband, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Heartfelt sentiments express admiration for Dr. King's vision, dedication, and teachings.

Letter from Mrs. King to Ms. Dixie Lee Kisor Regarding Home Helper Position

In this letter dated 6/22/63, Mrs. King informs Ms. Kisor of her decision not to employ her as a home-helper. She and Dr. King believe it would be in the best interest of the children to have someone who would be available on a permanent basis.

Letter from Mrs. R. K. Matthews to Mrs. King

This letter is from a middle class housewife who expressed her despair and frustration to Mrs. King in learning of Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from Mrs. Raphael Demos to Mrs. Coretta Scott King

Mrs. Demos thanks Mrs. King for her Christmas card and expresses congratulations on the birth of Martin Luther III. Mrs. Demos goes on to provide Coretta with various updates occurring in her own life.

Letter from Mrs. Raymond Gautier and Mrs. Robert Joyner to MLK

The President and Secretary of a Seattle benefit guild, an organization consisting of twelve Negro women who seek to "promote unity for the improvement of the community," request a meeting with Dr. King. The benefit guild hopes to sponsor a rally to raise funds for the SCLC. Furthermore they describe the Northwest as a silent "nice nasty."

Letter from Mrs. Sammie Adams to MLK

Mrs. Sammie Adams, a 67-year-old widow, writes an emotional appeal to Dr. and Mrs. King in an effort to collect money for Easter clothes for her children. She acknowledges that she previously donated to Dr. King and the cause for civil rights and would benefit from some assistance.

Letter from Mrs. Samuel Turkenkopf to Coretta Scott King

Overwhelmed by the news of MLK winning the Noble Peace Prize, Mrs. Turkenkopf expresses her congratulations to Mrs. King.

Letter from Mrs. Uvee Mdodana-Arbouin to MLK

Mrs. Mdondana-Arbouin, President of the Women's Auxiliary of the Progressive Baptist National Convention, sends Dr. King the lyrics to the poem she delivered at their organization's recent dinner.

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