Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

King, Martin Luther

b. 1889 - d. 1984

Martin Luther King Sr. was born Michael King in Stockbridge, Georgia. In 1918, he moved to Atlanta and boarded with A. D. Williams, the pastor of Ebenezer Baptist Church. Williams encouraged King’s education. King earned a theology degree from Morehouse College and married Williams’ eldest daughter, Alberta. They had three children; Michael Luther Jr. was born in 1929. In 1931, King succeeded his father-in-law as pastor of Ebenezer. King Sr. led efforts to register African American voters and to equalize the pay of African American teachers. Inspired by a visit to Germany, he changed his and his son’s name to Martin Luther in honor of the Protestant reformer. King Sr., affectionately known as Daddy King, was a mentor to many in the movement. He survived his wife, shot while playing the organ at Ebenezer Church in 1974; a son, A. D., preacher and civil rights activist, who drowned in 1969; and Martin Jr., on whose behalf he accepted numerous awards before his own death in 1984.

Associated Archive Content : 59 results

A Resolution for Dr. King from the Church Women United in Atlanta

This is a resolution honoring Dr. King's life and work upon his untimely death.

A Statement to the South and Nation

This seemingly unexceptional document signifies the birth of the SCLC. Dr. King, Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth and Rev. C. K. Steele assembled a consortium of leaders in Atlanta following the end of the Montgomery Bus Boycott. The Southern Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration issued this statement that addresses the intimidation, discrimination and economic disparity Negroes face in the South. The statement appeals to the federal government to intervene against assaults that block basic civil rights.

A Statement to the South and the Nation

The Southern Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration issued this statement to the nation regarding the unresolved problems of civil rights. The leaders asked for all Negroes, particularly those in the South, to assert their human dignity and to seek justice by rejecting all injustices.

Anonymous Criticism of MLK's Stance on Vietnam

This anonymous letter writer feels that Dr. King's active stance against the Vietnam war takes away from his fight for civil rights. He includes a newspaper article that encapsulates Dr. King's views on the subject, and lists the reasons he feels that Dr. King is being unpatriotic.

Biography of MLK

Margaret B. Young details the events and accomplishments of Dr. King's life.

Biography of Rev. Martin Luther King Sr

This document presents a biographical sketch of Rev. Martin Luther King Sr.

Called To Responsible Freedom

Mount Olivet sponsors a youth week program of Christian education featuring Dr. King as a keynote speaker.

Church Program of the Installation of Rev. A. D. Williams King

This program details the installation services of Reverend A. D. Williams King at The First Baptist Church of Ensley, Alabama. A number of community and church leaders, including his older brother, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Rev. Ralph Abernathy, welcome the young pastor and his family to his new pastorate position.

Dexter Avenue Baptist Church Annual Report, 1955-1956

This report contains vital information concerning the organizational structure, services, and members of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church. Dr. King provides a heartfelt address to the Montgomery, AL congregation as he seeks to extend the church's influence throughout the community amidst his growing involvement in the Civil Rights Movement.

Diagram of Apartment Complex Sponsored by Ebenezer Baptist Church

Three dimensional diagram of an apartment complex sponsored by Ebenezer Baptist Church.

Dr. King Leaves Montgomery for Atlanta

This news release announces Dr. King's decision to resign as Pastor of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama and move to Atlanta, Georgia. Relocating to Atlanta will enable Dr. King to Co-Pastor Ebenezer Baptist Church with his father, and will leave him in close proximity to the SCLC.

Dr. King Sermon Outline - "Choose Life"

This handwritten document is an outline of a sermon entitled "Choose Life."

Ebenezer Baptist Church Courtesy Guild Fifth Anniversary

This document is a cover page for the program of the Ebenezer Baptist Church Courtesy Guild Fifth Anniversary. Included is a listing of Guild Officers and Ministers.

Ebenezer Church Bulletin and President Kennedy's Eulogy

This is an Ebenezer Baptist Church bulletin expressing appreciation for the congregation's various acts of kindness toward one another. On the opposite side of the bulletin, an outline can be found for a memorial speech for the late President Kennedy.

Final Itinerary for Mrs. Coretta King and Party

This document contains the final itinerary for Mrs. King and her party's trip. The group is traveling with Henderson Travel Service to Oslo, Norway to see Dr. King receive the Nobel Peace Prize.

Flight Schedule for Coretta Scott King and Party

The Henderson Travel Service provides a detailed schedule of suggested flights for Coretta Scott King and others traveling to witness Dr. King receive the Nobel Peace Prize.

Flyer for SCLC Mass Meeting

This flyer advertises a 1958 Norfolk, VA SCLC mass meeting.

Get Well Letter from William H. Allen, M.D.

William H. Allen, M.D. sent this letter to Dr. King expressing sympathy to Dr. King, for his nearly fatal stabbing. Dr. Allen, further into the letter, encouraged Dr. King to continue to pray in order to eliminate evil in the world and hoped he will remain protected to continue his mission for freedom.

Letter from Abie Williams to MLK

Mr. Williams, a former parishioner of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, now imprisoned, bids Dr. King's pastoral advice. In addition, he requests a few of Dr. Kings books for studying purposes.

Letter from August Schou to MLK

August Schou of the Nobel Committee responds to Dr. King's secretary, Dora McDonald, regarding Dr. King's arrival in Norway for the Nobel Peace Prize Award. Schou explains the importance of Dr. King arriving at the recommended date as well as the proper attire and a short list of other individuals invited to join Dr. King.

Letter from D. G. Witt to MLK

D. G. Witt notifies Dr. King that Preferred Risk Mutual Insurance Company has reconsidered canceling Dr. King's automobile insurance. Due to the number of accidents Dr. King has had, continued coverage will require payment of a higher surcharge.

Letter from Dennis Askey to Dora McDonald Regarding Nobel Peace Prize

Dennis Askey from the United States Information Agency sends Dora McDonald a detailed itinerary of the award ceremony for the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rennie Kiah

Dr. King and Dora McDonald express their gratitude for Mr. Rennie L. Kiah's suggestions. Mr. Kiah brings awareness to Dr. King about the "unkempt" property owned by the City of Atlanta. Dr. King attempts to contact the City Manager to clean up the property that is next to Ebenezer Church.

Letter from Dr. King to anonymous

In a handwritten draft addressed simply to "gentleman," Dr. King expressed gratitude for having received a copy of a study entitled "Civil Disobedience: Morality and the Coming of the Civil War." So impressed with the contents of the book, Dr. King made it available to staff as reference resource.

Letter from Irene Bryson to MLK

Mrs. Bryson introduces herself as a former neighbor of the King family on Auburn Avenue and recalls fond memories during those years. She compliments Dr. King "as a God sent preacher," and cites biblical scriptures for him to incorporate in his public speaking. Bryson states, teaching God's word "is what it is going to take to help this sin sick world we are living in."

Letter from J. Stanley Purnell to Rev. MLK, Sr.

The Chairman of the United Health Foundations, J. Stanley Purnell, sends out an gratitude of thanks to Daddy King.

Letter from MLK to Robert Weaver

Dr. King writes HUD Secretary Robert Weaver to discuss issues regarding urban conditions and economic development.

Letter from MLK's Secretary to Rev. and Mrs. Martin Luther King, Sr.

Dr. King's secretary sends information to Dr. King's parents regarding their upcoming trip to Oslo, Norway.

Letter from Mrs. Stitzinger to Martin Luther King Sr.

Mrs. Stitzinger asserts that the African American community is entitled to their rights but that it doesn't mean that white people have to acknowledge or accept them. She suggests that they create black owned restaurants, hotels, etc. solely so black people will not have to interact directly with the white race.

Letter from Paul Madsen to MLK

Paul Madsen, Associate Executive Secretary of the American Baptist Home Mission Societies, offers Dr. King a consulting position with the organization. The organization needs someone to provide guidance on critical decisions, appear at a limited number of speaking engagements, and to make suggestions to the organization as needed. He mentions that the consulting arrangement could be used to help Ebenezer Baptist Church's budget.

Pages