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King, Martin Luther, Jr.

Associated Archive Content : 7385 results

"A Knock At Midnight"

This is a draft of the sermon Dr. King wrote comparing a story from the Bible in St. Luke to the struggle to obtain equality and civil rights.

"Barnett Says JFK Aids Reds"

In a testimony before the Senate Commerce Committee, Mississippi Governor Ross R. Barnett expresses his staunch opposition to President Kennedy's recent civil rights legislation. Governor Barnett goes as far as to associate recent Communist Party activities to the recent "racial agitation, strife, and conflict" emerging from the Civil Rights Movement.

"Danger in Demonstrations"

This article, from the newspaper "Chicago's American," criticizes Dr. King's demonstrations on open housing in Chicago.

"Discerning the Signs of History"

Dr. King believes that there are lessons in understanding the process of history, that evil carries the seed of destruction and that militarism is ultimately suicidal. Dr. King states that "history teaches the lesson that all reality hinges on moral foundations."

"Dr. King Denounces Write-In Plot"

Contrary to what radio announcements and newspapers advertise, Dr. King urges Negro voters to vote for a presidential candidate that is already on the ballot. He expresses that he is not a candidate and does not want voters to write his name on the ballot.

"Dr. King Outdated"

This editorial reviews Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" Under the heading "Dr. King Outdated." The review expresses Mr. Bob Smith's disagreement with many themes of the book.

"Dr. King Warns Against the Riots"

Eugene Patterson, of the Atlanta Constitution, transcribed his analysis of Dr. King's final publication, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" Mr. Patterson evaluated Dr. King's views on riots and agreed that riots did not produce any solid improvements to solve the problems in the Negro community.

"Drop Dead"

This letter, sent to Dr. King, emphasizes a clear disgust with Dr. King's tactics. The author insists that the best thing he could do for his people is "drop dead."

"Focus Months" of the New York Yearly Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends

In this document, this New York Yearly Meeting Office unveiled a plan of action for the months of March and April of 1968. The causes they focused on were the Black Power Movement and Dr. King's Poor People's Campaign initiative.

"God's Judgment on Western Civilization"

The document contains notes for a sermon given by Dr. King entitled, "God's Judgement on Western Civilization."

"Green Power" for Negroes

This SCLC news release documents the success of "a pioneer agreement between the Chicago Freedom Movement and a large grocery chain." As a product of Operation Breadbasket, this development cycled both jobs and capital to keep them organic to the Negro community.

"HLS"

"HLS" believes that Dr. King is wrong in thinking that the Republican Party will do more for African Americans than the Democratic Party.

"Ideal Traits"

In this article, the author confronts Dr. King's statement regarding Scandinavian countries. The author suggests that Dr. King does not have a full understanding of the culture and proceeds to enlighten him.

"In a Word-Now" by MLK

In the attainment of civil rights, Dr. King stresses the importance and urgency of "NOW". He further expounds on the immediate and effective actions that should be exercised by the Federal government to better the society.

"Lost Sheep" or "The God of the Lost"

Dr. King delivers a sermon about the parable of the lost sheep from the book of Luke. In this sermon, Dr. King poses the question that has pondered mankind for ages, "What is God Like?" He declares, "God is like a good shepherd" caring for his sheep. Dr. King commends the good done in America, but compares the nation to "a lost sheep" for failing to maintain equality for all men. He summarizes by describing good as a process, that everyone is significant and God is seeking to find the lost.

"Meaning of Georgia Elections"

Dr. King speaks about the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's Summer Community Organization and Political Education Project (SCOPE). He also talks about the political advancements that were made in the south.

"Race Hate and Divisiveness"

This newspaper clipping depicts Dr. King's decision to move the civil rights movement up north as "one of grave peril to everyone concerned." The author believes that the defiance of the law could cause disaster for the Negro cause.

"Rev. King Jumps Back into the Act"

This article expresses how Dr. King wants to take the attention off of the militants and place the focus back on non-violent expression.

"The American Dream"

This transcription of the commencement address delivered by Dr. King at Lincoln University on June 6 1961.

"The Drum Major Instinct" Ebenezer Baptist Church

The Drum Major Instinct, a sermon delivered by Dr. King at the Atlanta Ebenezer Baptist Church, frames the “instinct” as being responsible for the social ills of the world. Dr. King proclaims that racial inequality in America and the war in Vietnam are the result of nations engaging in a “bitter colossal contest for supremacy.” He suggests that the only way to end this “suicidal thrust” is to abide by an altered definition of the instinct – the definition of Jesus Christ.

"Where Do We Go From Here"-Invoice

This document contains a Harper & Row, Publishers invoice for the sale of four copies of Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go From Here?"

"Where Do We Go From Here?" Asks Negro King

In this article, Palmer Van Gundy reviews Dr. King's most recent book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?." He calls the book a must for all Americans, naming Dr. King not just the greatest civil rights leaders, but also a "leader for peace with freedom and justice."

103:15 General Correspondence 1967 (R)

Mrs. Reich suggests that Dr. King join the "other side" since he feels that the government is on the wrong side.

103:24 General Correspondence 1967 (S)

Addressed to Sigrid L. Sharp, this receipt is forwarded to Minneapolis, MN for a donation of $3.00 to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

104:3 General Correspondence 1967 (T)

Richard Tennent Jr. requests that Dr. King consider applying his efforts of non-violence to Cleveland, Ohio "...to help prevent the violence that seems inevitable." Tennent states that he cannot support the Reverend's stance on the Vietnam War, either financially or intellectually.

1922 Work

Dr. King identifies different philosophical points of Alfred North Whitehead's 1922 publication, titled "The Principle of Relativity with Applications to Physical Science."

1964 Election

Dr. King explains "a sizable number of Negro voters" will register for the 1964 presidential election, recognizing the significance of political participation.

1965 Human Rights Day Flyer

This flyer advertises a rally to benefit South African victims of apartheid.

1965 Pacem In Terris Peace and Freedom Award

This program details the events surrounding the Davenport Catholic Interracial Council's 1965 Pacem In Terris Peace and Freedom Award. Dr. King received the award that year for exemplifying principles of peace and freedom.

1966 Notes on the War

Dr. King annotates a speech to address his concerns about the war in Vietnam and his duties as a civil rights leader.

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