Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

King, Martin Luther, Jr.

Associated Archive Content : 7385 results

Augustinanism

Dr. King writes notes on Saint Augustine, Bishop of Hippo, and his "vast theological system" called Augustinianism. Dr. King describes the system as a comprehensive church philosophy that was very pessimistic about the nature of man.

Augustine (Concept of Evil)

Dr. King quotes theologian St. Augustine's "Confessions."

Augustine's Doctrine of Evil

Dr. King cites Albert Knudson's "The Doctrine of Redemption.

Augustine's Theory of Knowledge

Dr. King discusses St. Augustine's Theory of Knowledge. According to Augustine, "sense knowledge is the lowest level of knowledge."

Authoritarianism

Dr. King quotes William Pepperell Montague's "Ways of Knowing."

Autograph Request

German citizen, Reinhold Kohl, requests an autograph of Dr. King for his collection.

Autograph Request

James McInerney requests that Dr. King add to his autograph collection of "the most prominent leaders in the nation."

Autograph Request from Donald Koos

Donald Koos of Detroit, Michigan requests an autograph from Dr. King for his collection.

Back Our Brothers: First Annual Awards Banquet

Dr. King, Ralph Abernathy, Wyatt Walker and Fred Shuttlesworth were honored at a special banquet in New York City, following SCLC's successful 1963 Birmingham campaign.

Background of the Speakers

This document lists speakers for rallies in New York and San Francisco and gives a short biography of each person. The speakers include people such as Dr. Benjamin Spock, Dr. King, Rev. James Bevel, Floyd McKissick, Julian Bond and others. The document also lists folk singers for each rally location, a list that includes Pete Seeger.

Bacon

Dr. King notes Alexander Pope's characterization of Francis Bacon.

Barth

Dr. King writes on Barth's stance on the authoritative values of the Bible "in the tradition of Calvin."

Barth

Dr. King writes about Karl Barth's theology regarding revelation.

Barth

Dr. King notes Karl Barth's views on Jesus.

Barth

Dr. King notes Swiss theologian Karl Barth's favorite expression on revelation.

Barth - The Epistle to the Romans

Dr. King quotes Karl Barth's "The Epistle to the Romans."

Barth and Brunner

Dr. King notes the views of Swiss theologians Karl Barth and Emil Brunner on God, making reference to Soren Kierkegaard (SK).

Barth on Dogmatics

Dr. King examines Karl Barth's view of dogmatics as an act of faith.

Barth, Karl

Dr. King references Karl Barth's "The Doctrine of the Word of God."

Barth, Karl

Dr. King comments on Karl Barth's view that Christ assumed fallen human nature.

Bayard Rustin: Right to Work Laws

This booklet, written chiefly by Bayard Rustin, suggests that the "Right to Work" laws handicap minorities in the American workforce. The "Right to Work" law is a statute that bans union security agreements, which Rustin posits is undemocratic and assists in exploiting and perpetuating American poverty.

Belafonte

This program details a 1961 Harry Belafonte concert sponsored by the SCLC.

Belated Birthday Card to MLK

Ben Shahn on Human Rights

The following brochure advertises the contents associated with the Frederick Douglass Institute of Negro Arts and History located in Washington, D.C. This particular exhibition sponsored by Ben Shahn highlights the subject of human rights. The brochure contains sketches of Gandhi and Dr. King.

Berdyaev

Dr. King quotes a passage from Nikolai Berdyaev's "Slavery and Freedom" about religious, technological and spiritual revolutions.

Berkeley, George

Dr. King notes Berkeley's views on metaphysics.

Bernard of Clairvaux

Dr. King quotes Bernard of Clairvaux on the character of the ideal Christian.

Bernard of Clairvaux

Dr. King writes about Bernard of Clairvaux and his idea of the character of the ideal Christian.

Beyond Condemnation

Dr. King outlines a sermon entitled "Beyond Condemnation." He references the biblical story about a woman condemned to death by the Pharisees for adultery. Jesus commands "the person without sin to cast the first stone" as a lesson that all sins are equal and that no one should judge the flaws of others.

Beyond the Los Angeles Riots

Dr. King discusses the legacy of the Los Angeles riots in nonviolent protest. A decade after the Montgomery Civil Rights demonstrations, Dr. King speaks to the improvement of Southern African Americans' lives and the degradation of Northern African Americans' situations.

Pages