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King, Yolanda

b. 1955 - d. 2007

Yolanda King, a human rights activist and actress, was the first of four children born to Dr. King and Coretta Scott King. After graduating from Smith College, she completed a master’s degree in theater at New York University. An outspoken gay rights activist, she served on the Board of Directors of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change, founded The King Center’s Cultural Affairs Program and was a member of many social advocacy organizations. In 1978, she portrayed Rosa Parks in a TV miniseries “King” about her father’s life and later co-founded a theater company with Attallah Shabazz, the eldest daughter of Malcolm X.

Associated Archive Content : 21 results

A Resolution for Dr. King from the Church Women United in Atlanta

This is a resolution honoring Dr. King's life and work upon his untimely death.

An Interview With MLK

A young student from Towns Elementary School in Atlanta interviews Dr. King for a class assignment. The student asks important questions relating to Dr. King's family background, career in ministry and his influence in the civil rights movement. When asked about being the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King responds by saying, "It is more of a tribute to the thousands of gallant people who have participated in the struggle for equality, and who have done it in a peaceful, courageous manner."

Blue Spiral Notebook

Contained in this notebook is a draft of Dr. King's statement to Judge James E. Webb following his arrest during the Rich's Magnolia Tea Room Sit-In. There is also an outline of a letter to female students who were arrested during the sit-in. On other pages a child practices handwriting.

Called To Responsible Freedom

Mount Olivet sponsors a youth week program of Christian education featuring Dr. King as a keynote speaker.

Christmas Card from the King Family

Coretta Scott King sends out a Christmas card from herself and her children.

Dr. King's Children Viewing his Body for First Time at the Funeral, April, 1968

This photo comes from the Benedict J. Fernandez "Countdown to Eternity" portfolio.
(Copyright: Benedict J. Fernandez)

Draft of MLK's An Open Letter to Negro Youth

In an open letter to Negro Youths, Dr. King urges them to stay committed to the nonviolent principles of social change in their plight to gain broad access to education and employment.

Flight Schedule for Coretta Scott King and Party

The Henderson Travel Service provides a detailed schedule of suggested flights for Coretta Scott King and others traveling to witness Dr. King receive the Nobel Peace Prize.

King Family Christmas Card

The King family sends out holiday greetings with their family Christmas card. The card displays a portrait of the King family along with a holiday message.

Letter from Coretta Scott King to Maude Ballou

Coretta Scott King offers her gratitude to Maude Ballou for her sending a form for a birth certificate.

Letter from Fran to Dr. & Mrs. King

Fran writes Dr. and Mrs. King to thank them for their hospitality during her stay at their home.

Letter from Mel Koch to MLK

Mel Koch responds to Dr. King's request about purchasing Volkswagen Microbuses for the Montgomery Improvement Association. Koch includes reasons as to why he opposes the idea and cannot recommend the vehicles for King's purposes.

Letter from Mrs. Raphael Demos to Mrs. Coretta Scott King

Mrs. Demos thanks Mrs. King for her Christmas card and expresses congratulations on the birth of Martin Luther III. Mrs. Demos goes on to provide Coretta with various updates occurring in her own life.

Letter from Noel N. Marder to MLK

Noel N. Marder, manager of the Negro Heritage Library, encloses a silver certificate from a coin shop to attempt to amuse Dr. King. Mr. Marder also hopes to connect with Dr. King to discuss his thoughts regarding the new plans that are in a stage of creation.

Letter from Reverend L. H. Hendricks Jr. to MLK

Reverend L. H. Hendricks Jr. asks Dr. King and the Ebenezer Baptist Church for financial assistance to build his church.

MLK Interview with Glenn E. Smiley

This early (1956) interview with Dr. King has as its center the Montgomery Bus Boycott, a seminal event in Dr. King's career and the Civil Rights Movement.

North and South: SCLC Staff News January, 1967

The January, 1967 edition of SCLC's staff newsletter shares Christmas and New Year stories from the staff members and their families. The newsletter also reports on recent activities of the organization such as a Chicago boycott, Junius Griffin's move to the Republican National Committee, a political rally, the SCLC's housing project in Chicago, a recent conference on Negro history, the situation in Grenada, Mississippi and other news items.

Open Letter from MLK to Negro Youth

In the wake of the urban uprisings of 1966, Dr. King writes an open letter to Negro youth empathizing with their desire to return to school and to find jobs. He mentions that he's written the President urging funding so all poor children can attend school and advocating implementation of a public works program to provide jobs for youth. He encourages young people to abstain from violence as ineffective in achieving their goals.

Telegram from King Children to Master Billy Watchel

The King children thank Billy Wachtel for the Christmas gifts he sent to them.

The Dilemma of Negro Americans

In this draft of a chapter for his book Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community?, Dr. King offers an in-depth description of the plight of African Americans over the past few hundred years and how it will never be fully understood by their white counterparts. He recounts the issues associated with American slavery – the dehumanization of slaves and the destruction of the family unit. He ties what happened in the past to what is occurring in the present, explaining that because of these layers of oppression African Americans have to play catch up to be seen as equals in America.

The Man Who Knows: General Westmoreland on Vietnam

This editorial from a New York newspaper features statements from General William C. Westmoreland arguing for the public's support "about what is going on in Viet Nam, and why." Dr. King is among those listed as having opposing viewpoints towards the War.