Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Marshall, Burke

b. 1922 - d. 2003

Burke Marshall was head of the Civil Rights Division of the U.S. Department of Justice during the Kennedy and Johnson administrations. Marshall earned bachelor’s and law degrees from Yale University. Beginning in 1952, he worked for Covington & Burling, specializing in antitrust law. Robert Kennedy appointed Marshall assistant attorney general in 1961, a position he held until his resignation in 1964. He was responsible for litigating voting rights and desegregation cases and was influential in writing the 1964 Civil Rights Act. Dr. King regularly consulted with Marshall on rights issues. Along with other movement leaders and Robert Kennedy, Marshall and King met in April 1962 to discuss voting rights. In Why We Can’t Wait, King acknowledged Marshall’s work in the Birmingham negotiations.

Associated Archive Content : 21 results

"University Plans 'Liberties' Program"

Experts at Columbia University plan to adopt a program that will make the meaning of American liberties more relatable to students.

Letter from Assistant Attorney General Burke Marshall to MLK

Assisrtant US Attorney General Burk Marshall informs Dr. King that the allegations of police misconduct in Danville, Virginia are being investigated by the Department of Justice and assures him that the appropriate actions will take place "with respect to any violations of federal law."

Letter from Assistant Attorney General Burke Marshall to MLK

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General, responds to Dr. King's telegram regarding the assault of Rev. Paul Chapman. Marshall informs him that evidence has failed to disclose any "violation of a federal criminal statute," so the Department of Justice is unable to take action.

Letter from Burke Marshall of the Department of Justice to MLK

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Rights Division of the US Department of Justice, writes Dr. King in response to a joint telegram concerning an investigation in Lee County, Georgia.

Letter from Burke Marshall of the Department of Justice to MLK

In reply to Dr. King's telegram concerning the actions of a Mitchell County peace officer towards Mrs. Slater King, the wife of a civil rights activist and successful real estate broker, Assistant Attorney General Burke Marshall writes that an investigation of this matter has been ordered.

Letter from Burke Marshall of the Department of Justice to MLK

Civil Rights Division Assistant Attorney General Burke Marshall informs Dr. King that the Department of Justice is investigating the assault upon Reverend Paul Chapman.

Letter from Burke Marshall of the Department of Justice to MLK Regarding Paul Chapman

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice, writes Dr. King in reference to a previous telgram correspondence concerning an assault on Reverend Paul Chapman. Burke writes that his department can take no action due to a lack of evidence indicating a crime.

Letter from Burke Marshall of the US Department of Justice to MLK

Civil Rights Division Assistant Attorney General Burke Marshall responds to a telegram from Dr. King requesting an investigation regarding conditions at the Mitchell County, Georgia Jail. Marshall points out that his department has no juridiction in the absence of any federal violations, but he assures the Reverend that he will examine any information sent by Dr. King.

Letter from Burke Marshall to MLK

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General of the Dept. of Justice, responds to Dr. King's telegram requesting a Federal investigation concerning an incident involving Mr. Toomes Clendon and Sheriff W. E. Hammond. In closing, Marshall assures the Reverend that appropriate action will be taken should a violation be involved.

Letter from Burke Marshall to MLK

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General of the Department of Justice, writes Dr. King in response to a recent telegram concerning an investigation in the alleged assault upon Miss Shirley Gaines by an Albany police officer.

Letter from Burke Marshall to MLK

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice, informs Dr. King that his department is inquiring into events in Greenwood, Mississippi that Dr. King brought to his attention. He assures Dr. King that the Justice Department will take appropriate action with respect to any violations of federal law.

Letter from Burke Marshall to MLK

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General, writes Dr. King in response to a telegram sent by the Reverend protesting action be taken by the State of Louisiana against the Southern Conference Educational Fund.

Letter from Burke Marshall to MLK

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General, writes Dr. King acknowledging his previous telegram about racism in St. Augustine, Florida. In addition, Marshall refers a copy of the telegram to the attention of George B. Hartzog, Jr.

Letter from Clarence B. Jones to the Editor of New York Times

Clarence Jones writes the editor of the New York Times to comment on a statement made by James Reston. According to Mr. Jones the statement was factually inaccurate and partially paraphrased.

Letter from MLK to Burke Marshall of the US Justice Department

Dr. King writes Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General in the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice, expressing gratitude for Marshall's leadership in guiding the Civil Rights Act of 1964 through both houses of Congress.

Letter from Mr. Burke Marshall to MLK Regarding Political Opinion

In this document, Mr. Mashall writes to Dr. King regarding issues surrounding the National Advisory Commission on Selective Service. He requests that Dr. King writes on behalf of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference on matters further outlined in Section 2.

Letter from US Attorney General Robert Kennedy Forwarded to MLK

John L. Murphy writes Dr. King to forward him a letter for the Reverend from US Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy that his office received in error. In the forwarded letter, Kennedy thanks Dr. King for his willingness to contribute to a series of oral interviews for the John F. Kennedy library.

One Vote for Every Man: Civil Rights Act

In this draft of an article for the March 1965 IUD Agenda, an AFL-CIO monthly publication, Dr. King recounts the progress made by the Civil Rights Movement and states that the issue in 1965 is the right to vote and the venue is Selma, Alabama. He discusses the pattern of exclusion, including the abuse of power by local sheriffs, illegal use of local and state laws, delay tactics of registrars, and literacy tests. He outlines measures that a Civil Rights Act of 1965 should include.

Telegram from MLK and Wyatt Walker to Burke Marshall

Dr. King and Wyatt Walker send an urgent request for Burke Marshall to investigate the bombing of SCLC Board Member C. O. Simpkins' home in Shreveport, Louisiana. The two SCLC officials inform Mr. Marshall that the suspects were released for lack of evidence despite other information to the contrary.

Telegram from MLK and Wyatt Walker to Burke Marshall

Dr. King and Rev. Wyatt Tee Walker send a urgent request to Burke Marshall of the United States Department of Justice. The two ministers seek a federal investigation in the brutal beating of an SCLC Voter Registration worker in Georgia.

Telegrams from MLK to John and Robert Kennedy

In these draft telegrams, Dr. King requests a meeting with President John Kennedy and Attorney General Robert Kennedy to address the imminent crisis in the South.