Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

McDonald, Dora E.

b. 1925 - d. 2007

Dora Edith McDonald attended South Carolina State College. After graduation she worked as secretary for Benjamin Mays, president of Morehouse College. In 1960 Dr. King hired her as his personal secretary, a position she held until his death. Working from Ebenezer Baptist Church and then the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) office, McDonald typed King’s manuscripts and sermons, took telephone calls, organized his speaking engagements and often traveled with him. She was his confidante, sounding board and close family friend. McDonald traveled with the Kings to Oslo for the Nobel Peace Prize ceremony and informed Mrs. King of her husband’s assassination. From 1972 to 1977 she worked for Andrew Young in his congressional office, taking a job with IBM when Young was appointed United Nations ambassador. Her memoir Sharing the Dream: Martin Luther King, Jr., the Movement, and Me was published in 2007.

Associated Archive Content : 454 results

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. Bill Green

Dora McDonald informs Mrs. Bill Green that Dr. King is on an extended lecture tour at the moment. She ensures Mrs. Green that the letter and poem sent will receive his attention upon his return.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. E. A. Larson

Dora McDonald notifies Mrs. E. Larson of Dr. King's absence and informs her that he has never been to Russia, but has no objection to a visit there.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. Edward Greaves

Miss Dora McDonald informs Mrs. Edward Greaves that additional copies of Dr. King's sermon entitled "Paul's Letter to American Christians" are unavailable. She refers Mrs. Greaves to locate the sermon in Dr. King's newly released book "Strength to Love."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. H. Libby

Dora McDonald sends Mrs. Libby a copy of Dr. King's sermon "Paul's Letter to American Christians." McDonald could not retrieve a copy of the address preached at the Riverside Church that Mrs. Libby requested.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. Jessie C. Treichler

Dora McDonald writes Mrs. Treichler to inform her that she will provide Dr. and Mrs. King arrival time at a later date. She also explains that Dr. King's physician has highly recommended that he limits his amount of events during his travels, therefore she feels sure that he will not be able to commit to all of her suggestions.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. Oliver Kannon

Miss McDonald informs Mrs. Kannon that Dr. King will be unable to accept the Easton NAACP's invitation to speak.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. Uvee Mdonana-Arbouin

On behalf of Dr. King, Dora McDonald expresses appreciation for the poem of Mrs. Uvee Mdonana-Arbouin of the Progressive National Baptist Convention in New York. She encloses fifty copies of one of Dr. King's letters as Mrs. Mdonana-Arbouin requested.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Nina C. Brown

Dora McDonald provides Nina C. Brown with details about Dr. King's upcoming appearance at Pennsylvania State University.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Otto Fuerbringer of Time Magazine

Dora McDonald inquires about receiving additional copies of the Time Magazine issue that featured Dr. King as the Man of the Year. She informs Otto Fuerbringer that Mrs. King's relatives in her hometown of Marion, Alabama were unable to buy copies of the magazine.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ozell Sutton

Ms. McDonald responds to Mr. Sutton's request for seventy-five copies of Dr. King's "Letter from the Birmingham Jail." She regretfully informs the sender that their office is out of re-prints; however she suggests that he obtain copies of Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait" in which the Letter from the Birmingham Jail is printed.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Paul J. Dolan

On behalf of Dr. King, Dora McDonald grants Paul J. Dolan approval to use the "I Have A Dream" speech that Dr. King delivered at the March on Washington.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Paul Kurtz

Dora McDonald grants Kurtz permission to print Dr. King's unedited speech "as is," as long as Kurtz indicates on the speech that is taken from a tape and is un-edited.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Pearl Goodwin

In response to a previous request, Dora McDonald informs Pearl Goodwin that Dr. King will be unable to provide a commentary for her book "A Book of Commentary." She mentions that the request cannot be fulfilled due to Dr. King's chaotic speaking schedule.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Peggy Duff

Dr. King's secretary Dora McDonald communicates with Peggy Duff of London. Miss McDonald informs Miss Duff of Dr. King's travels outside of Atlanta. The particular matter, unkown and referenced in this letter, will be conveyed to him once he arrives back to SCLC.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Peter Seeger

Ms. McDonald informs American folk singer,Peter Seeger, that Dr. King will be unable to accept the invitation to appear on a Japan television program in January or February of the coming year. Dr. King asks that Mr. Seeger informs the program host that sometime during the summer would be more favorable for his schedule.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Peter White

Dora McDonald notifies Peter White, of the University of Western Ontario, that Dr. King is unable to accept any additional speaking engagements for the "next seven or eight months."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Prentiss Childs

Dr. King's secretary, Dora McDonald, sends this letter to Mr. Prentiss Childs of CBS. The correspondence serves as documentation for reimbursement of Dr. King's recent trip to Washington, D.C.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Queen Mother Moore

Dora McDonald communicates with Queen Mother Moore to discuss Dr. King's inability to meet with her prior to the Washington Campaign for Jobs or Income. Queen Mother Moore was an important figure during the Civil Right Movement and a founder of the Republic of New Afrika.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rabbi Irving J. Block

Dora McDonald requests Rabbi Irving J. Block contact Stanley Levison, Dr. King's attorney in New York City.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rabbi Joel Goor

Dora McDonald informs Rabbi Joel Goor of Dr. King's absence from the city due to an engagement to speak before the European Baptist Federation. She promises to have Dr. King signed a copy of his book for Goor to keep and appreciates Goor's support to the civil rights movement.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ralph Creger

Dr. King's secretary responds to Mr. Creger's request to use "Letter from the Birmingham Jail" in his book. Ms. McDonald informs the author that the Letter is being expanded in an upcoming publication, therefore all requests for reprints are being denied. The Letter would eventually be published in Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait" in 1964.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ralph Kates

Dora McDonald writes Ralph Kates on behalf of Dr. King accepting their invitation to visit St. Joseph College.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ray Gibbons

Dora McDonald returns a check from Alice E. Gwinn to Dr. King because it is made out to the Council for Christian Social Action, and it needs to be endorsed before Dr. King can deposit it.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rennie Kiah

Dr. King and Dora McDonald express their gratitude for Mr. Rennie L. Kiah's suggestions. Mr. Kiah brings awareness to Dr. King about the "unkempt" property owned by the City of Atlanta. Dr. King attempts to contact the City Manager to clean up the property that is next to Ebenezer Church.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. A. Dale Fiers

Miss McDonald confirms that Dr. King will speak in Dallas at a meeting organized by the Assembly of Christian Churches. She also requests details about the speaking engagement and encloses a biographical sketch and photograph.

Letter From Dora McDonald to Rev. Albert F. Campbell

Secretary McDonald writes Rev. Campbell on Dr. King's behalf, informing him of that Dr. King will consider his invitation to the next Men's and Women's Day celebration.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. Alfred T. Davies

Dora McDonald informs Rev. Alfred T. Davies that Dr. King will not be able to submit a sermon for "The Church Speaks on Race." Dr. King has just published "Strength to Love," which includes his sermons on many of the aspects of the civil rights movement.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. C.A. Echols

Dora McDonald responds to Rev. C.A. Echols on behalf of Dr. King. She encloses a statement from Dr. King which was pubished in the "Massachusetts Review" for Echol's graduate studies.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. Celestine Fernando

Ms. McDonald grants Reverend Fernando permission to publish Dr. King's, "Letter from Birmingham Jail."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. Clyde L. Manschreck

On behalf of Dr. King, Dora McDonald responds to a previous request made by Rev. Clyde Manschreck of the Methodist Theological School in Ohio. Miss McDonald informs Rev. Manschreck that the "Letter from Birmingham Jail" will be a part of Dr. King's newest publication that will be available in the fall of 1963.

Pages