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McDonald, Dora E.

b. 1925 - d. 2007

Dora Edith McDonald attended South Carolina State College. After graduation she worked as secretary for Benjamin Mays, president of Morehouse College. In 1960 Dr. King hired her as his personal secretary, a position she held until his death. Working from Ebenezer Baptist Church and then the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) office, McDonald typed King’s manuscripts and sermons, took telephone calls, organized his speaking engagements and often traveled with him. She was his confidante, sounding board and close family friend. McDonald traveled with the Kings to Oslo for the Nobel Peace Prize ceremony and informed Mrs. King of her husband’s assassination. From 1972 to 1977 she worked for Andrew Young in his congressional office, taking a job with IBM when Young was appointed United Nations ambassador. Her memoir Sharing the Dream: Martin Luther King, Jr., the Movement, and Me was published in 2007.

Associated Archive Content : 454 results

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. Harold L. Sawyer

Miss McDonald informs Rev. Sawyer that he finds it difficult to schedule appointments more than three months in advance due to his hectic schedule, and cannot accept his invitation to speak at Hiram College at this time.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. Marshall Shepard

Dora McDonald, Secretary to Dr. King, writes Rev. Marshall Shepard, Jr. to accept a speaking invitation at their 8:00 a.m. Sunday Service on behalf of Reverend King.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. Oliver W. Holmes

Miss McDonald informs Rev. Holmes that Dr. King is out of the country, but that a tentative date has been set for Dr. King to meet with Mrs. Faber, a student who would like to speak with Dr. King regarding her dissertation.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. Otis Moss

Dora McDonald informs Rev. Otis Moss, Dr. King's former co-pastor at Ebenezer Baptist Church, that Dr. King will not be able to accept his invitation to speak at Mt. Zion Baptist Church for Men's Day due to his travels.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. William Lawson

Dora McDonald writes in response to a request from Reverend William Lawson of Texas Southern University. McDonald encloses a biographical sketch and photograph of Dr. King, then relays a message from the Reverend to exclude a reception for him on May 17.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Reverend Goulding

Reverend Goulding encloses a copy of a letter from Dr. King to Dr. Ruden.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Robert Goldwin

Dora McDonald informs Dr. Robert A. Goldwin the four essays on "100 Years of Emancipation" have been received and placed on Dr. King's desk for him to read upon his return from out of town.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Robert Kennedy

Dora McDonald, Dr. King's secretary, informs Senator Robert F. Kennedy that Dr. King has accepted the invitation to appear before the subcommittee on Executive Reorganization.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rosa A. King

Miss McDonald informs Rosa King that Dr. King will be unable to speak at Central Baptist Church.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rose R. Silvers

Dora McDonald informs Rose Silvers that Dr. King was concerned about an unknown speaking arrangement that he was scheduled to fulfill. Due to a congested schedule, Dr. King will notify Silvers about his availability to speak in the near future.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Roselyn Silverman

Dora McDonald informs Roselyn Silverman of Dr. King's availability to speak at the University of Toledo in Ohio. She also informs Miss Silverman that Dr. King will be out of the country writing a book, so further inquiries regarding "new invitations" will be made upon his return.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ruby Hurley

At Dr. King's request, Ms. McDonald sends Ruby Hurley a check from Delores Robinson for a lifetime membership in the NAACP.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Samuel Evans

Dora McDonald writes to Samuel L. Evans, of Greater Philadelphia Citizens Committee, on behalf of Rev. Andrew Young regarding Dr. King's appearance in Philadelphia.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Sandra Durlauf

Dora McDonald encloses Dr. King's biographical information to help aid Sandra Durlauf in her studies. She also refers Mrs. Durlauf to read Dr. King's books "Stride Toward Freedom," "Crusader Without Violence," and "Strength to Love."

Letter From Dora McDonald to Sarah Harvey

Ms. McDonald thanks Mrs. Harvey for her contribution to the SCLC, and informs her that Dr. King will contact her on his return from Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Silas Norman of SNCC

Dora McDonald writes Silas Norman of SNCC to explain that Dr. King is currently touring several cities on the People-to-People tour and will be presiding over the SCLC convention. She informs him that his letter will be brought to Dr. King's attention upon his return.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Solomon Mendelson

In this letter, Dora McDonald is responding to Solomon Mendelson. McDonald expresses her excitement that Dr. King's "I Have A Dream" speech will be televised.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Stokley Carmichael

In this letter, Dora McDonald informs Stokley Carmichael about an enclosure of an autographed photograph of Dr. King.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Student Jacquelyn Gravely

Dora McDonald refers Allen High School student Jacquelyn Gravely to read "Stride Toward Freedom" and "Crusader Without Violence" for her school assignment. She conveys Dr. King's good wishes towards Gravely's academic career.

Letter from Dora McDonald to T. M. Benson

Dr. King's secretary responds to a request from Peak Publications to use a portion of Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail" in a tract. Ms. Dora explains to the company's representative that the letter will be published in an upcoming book, hence Dr. King has made a commitment to the publisher to refuse permission for reprints.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Thomas W. Johnson Declining an Invitation to Write an Article

This letter from Dora McDonald to Thomas W. Johnson is in response to a request for Dr. King to write an article for the December 12, 1966 edition of The Forum. Dora McDonald informs Thomas W. Johnson that Dr. King regrets his inability to accept the invitation at this time.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Walter Ducey

Dora McDonald informs Walter Ducey that Dr. King is out of town at the moment and grants him permission to include Dr. King's photograph and remarks in the publication he is producing.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Werner Schatz

Dora McDonald responds to a letter from Werner Schatz who has invited Dr. King to speak in Basel, Switzlerland. McDonald states that Dr. King received the letter upon arriving from abroad causing him to miss the date of the invitation.

Letter from Dora McDonald to William Grayson

Dora McDonald informs William Grayson that Dr. King's schedule does not permit him to make any more appearances in the year of 1962. Miss McDonald expresses her deep apologies for Dr. King's inabilities to attend.

Letter from Dora McDonald to William K. Du Val

Dora McDonald responds to William K. Du Val of the Commission on Ecumenical Mission and Relations on behalf of Dr. King.

Letter from Dora McDonald to William R. Cummings

Dora McDonald writes William Cummings to inform him that Dr. King is in jail at the moment and the date of his return is difficult to determine. She explains that he will eventually be happy to learn of Mr. Cummings' invitation, but unfortunately his schedule will permit his attendance.

Letter from Dora McDonald to William S. Thompson

Dora McDonald responds to William Thompson's letter inviting Dr. King to address the National Bar Association. She explains that Dr. King's calendar shows that he will not be able to attend the event due to his travels.

Letter from Dora McDonald to William Smith

Dora McDonald writes William Smith of Fullerton Junior College on behalf of Dr. King, granting permission to reprint material from Time magazine regarding "Letter from Birmingham Jail."

Letter from Dora to Joan

In this letter, Dora McDonald sends a photograph to Joan Daves.

Letter from Dr. C. O. Simpkins to MLK

Dr. Simpkins writes Dr. King to discuss the actions he has taken to end discrimination in the Dental Society. He expresses that a letter from national leaders like Dr. King would assist him greatly in his endeavors with the American Dental Association.

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