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Atlanta Journal Constitution

Associated Archive Content : 9 results

"Dr. King Warns Against the Riots"

Eugene Patterson, of the Atlanta Constitution, transcribed his analysis of Dr. King's final publication, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" Mr. Patterson evaluated Dr. King's views on riots and agreed that riots did not produce any solid improvements to solve the problems in the Negro community.

City's Leaders Plan Dinner for MLK

This article announces a banquet to be held to honor Dr. King for his Nobel Peace Prize award. The banquet is hosted by various leaders in the City of Atlanta.

Draft of Speech to the National Press Club

Dr. King's speech to the National Press Club in Washington D.C. was delivered a week after he was incarcerated in Albany, Georgia. This draft shows Dr. King's notes on his address about the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Alfred Duckett to MLK

This letter to Dr.King from a supporter emphasizes the need for reform in the SCLC. Particularly with its writings. He tells Dr.King the need for editing grammatical errors on SCLC literature. He believes he has a workable plan to make changes that would better serve Dr.King and the movement.

Letter from Eugene Patterson to MLK

Eugene Patterson thanks Dr. King for the congratulatory letter in which Dr. King clarified his position on Vietnam. Patterson also asks Dr. King to suggest a time for them to meet to discuss the Civil Rights Movement and Vietnam.

Letter from John Askins to MLK

John Askins requests that Dr. King correct the transcription of an earlier interview for publishing purposes.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Eugene Patterson

Dr. King addresses Mr. Patterson's editorials discussing "sincere questions and doubts" about Dr. King's stance on the conflict in Vietnam.

Letter from MLK to Ralph McGill

Dr. King writes to Ralph McGill of the Atlanta Constitution to clarify his position on the Vietnam War. Dr. King considers his objection to the war to be a matter of conscience, and not one of political expediency.

Letter from Tom Offenburger to MLK

In a letter from Tom Offenburger to Dr. King, a response to a newspaper article written by Bruce Galphin is attached. The article refers to the Civil Rights Movement as a rather violent campaign, due to the harm done to the "good order of society." The response argues on the side of the Civil Rights Movement, and further proves that it is indeed a nonviolent campaign.