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Randolph, A. Philip (Asa Philip)

b. 1889 - d. 1979

Born in Crescent City, Florida, Asa Philip Randolph was a labor organizer and civil rights activist. He moved to Harlem in 1911 and joined the Socialist Party, publicly opposing World War I. From 1925 to 1935, Randolph led the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, the first successful black trade union. His call for a March on Washington in 1941 to protest refusal to hire black workers prodded President Roosevelt to ban discrimination in the defense industry. His appeal for civil disobedience against conscription into the segregated armed forces influenced President Truman to desegregate the military in 1948. A vice president of the AFL-CIO, he helped found the Negro American Labor Council. Randolph mobilized significant union support for the civil rights movement and chaired the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. In 1964, President Lyndon Johnson awarded him the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

Associated Archive Content : 96 results

Memorandum from Theodore E. Brown Regarding 1968 Trip to Nigeria

Theodore E. Brown, the director of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa, reports the results of his recent trip to Nigeria to members of the Call Committee.

Minutes for the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights

The minutes for this meeting include the Civil Rights act of 1967, the "Freedom Budget," and discrimination in military off-post housing.

Montgomery Improvement Association Press Release About Emergency Conference

This press release from the Montgomery Improvement Association discusses an emergency conference called to address strategies for the integrated transportation campaign.

National Council of Churches Conference of Negro Leaders Opening Remarks

A. Philip Randolph makes remarks at the Conference of Negro Leaders National Council of Churches about the future of the Civil Rights Movement. Randolph expresses the importance of continuing the fight of social justice through civil rights, economics, housing and poverty.

Negro Leaders Urge Force Against Rhodesia

The American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa calls for all news media and wireless services to broadcast the release of "Negro Leaders Urge Force Against Rhodesia." This call to action was prompted by racial rebellions led by Ian Smith. It was the hope of civil rights leaders to strengthen "Negro" and African relations by increasing support of peace in Africa.

New York Post: A Poor Show

The Child Development Group in Mississippi (CDGM) was a head start project created in 1965 with the help of a federally funded grant. The program not only specialized in child development, but sought to increase community involvement. In late 1966, Mississippi Senator Stennis "opened fire" on the program, charging those involved with malpractice. Consequently, Sargent Shiver, Director of the Office of Economic Opportunity, formed a "more respectable anti-poverty unity" called Mississippi Action for Progress to takeover CDGM.

Photograph Outline for "Why We Can't Wait"

This draft outlines the images and captions used in Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait." Some of the material incorporated includes images and descriptions of Dr. King at the 1963 March on Washington, the Birmingham Campaign, other heavily involved civil rights leaders, and Dr. King's family.

Preliminary Outline for a Conference on Democratic Planning For America

This preliminary outline features a number of keynote dignitaries and leaders who will address a number of economic, labor, and social justice issues during the three-day Conference on Democratic Planning for America.

Press Release for the Southern Negro Leaders Conference

Dr. King, Rev. C.K. Steele, and Rev. F. L. Shuttlesworth called for an emergency conference to strategize and unify further bus desegregation efforts in the south. This is the press release announcing the meeting of the Southern Negro Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-violent Integration. The agenda was ambitious, but specific and explicit. One of the outcomes of the meeting was the formation of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, with Dr. King chosen to lead.

Program from Community Salute to MLK: Nobel Peace Prize Winner

This program is from the Community Salute to Dr. King that occured in New York City following his being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Proposals

Dr. King writes a proposal to the Democratic and Republican national conventions regarding the Constitutional rights and human dignity of Negroes. King warns the parties that "platforms and promises are no longer sufficient to meet the just and insistent demands of the Negro people for immediate free and unconditional citizenship." King earnestly requests the parties to ensure: Negro people in the South secure the right to vote, an end to terror against Negroes, and enforcement of the 1954 Supreme Court decision against school segregation.

Speech to the American Psychological Association

In this speech on the 75th anniversary of the American Psychological Association, Dr. King acknowledges the help that social science can have in the quest of Negroes for equality. He identifies three areas for study: Negro leadership, the efficacy of political action, and the psychological and ideological changes taking place in Negroes as a result of a decade of struggle.

Speeches by the Leaders

In this booklet, the NAACP compiled famous speeches from the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Included are speeches from A. Philip Randolph, Roy Wilkins, James Farmer, Rev. Eugene Carson Blake, Rabbi Joachim Prinz, Whitney M. Young, Matthew Ahmann, John Lewis, Walter Reuther, and Dr. King. The booklet concludes with a pledge and a picture of the throng of supporters that attended the event. test

Statement by MLK

In this statement, Dr. King enforces the mission and organizational structure of the SCLC as a means of denouncing the traditional ideas associated with the "Black Power" slogan.

Statement on The Negro's Political and Economic Power

Dr. King discusses the inferior political and economic power of the American Negro against the backdrop of emerging Black Power organizations. He reveals several new non-violent programs the SCLC targeted at economic and social justice: youth training and political reformation in the South. It is in accordance with the philosophy of non-violence that Dr. King believes the vast majority of Negroes will birth a "community in which neither power nor dignity will be black or white."

Statements on Jobs and Poverty

Dr. King explains the relationship between violence and the lack of employment among young people. Dr. King also speaks of the Thanksgiving Fast for Freedom and its efforts to end poverty and hunger.

Telegram from A Philip Randolph to MLK

Mr. A. Philip Randolph offers his brotherhood and support to Dr. King, who is imprisoned in the Jefferson County jail.

Telegram from A. Philip Randolph to MLK

A. Philip Randolph congratulates Dr. King on the statement he made on "Face the Nation."

Telegram from A. Philip Randolph to MLK

A. Philip Randolph expresses his discontent with the release of a manifesto from civil rights leaders without Dr. King's signature.

Telegram from A. Phillip Randolph to MLK

A. Phillip Randolph, on behalf of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters and the Negro American Labor Council, expresses joy at Dr. King's release from prison.

Telegram from Andrew Hieskell and A. Philip Randolph to MLK

Dr. King receives this telegram from Mr. Heiskell and Mr. Randolph regarding the newly appointed chief executive of the National Urban Coalition.

Telegram from Bayard Rustin to MLK

Bayard Rustin invites Dr. King to join other civil rights leaders for a meeting that will be held in New York, NY.

Telegram from Community Leaders to Dr. King

This telegram is requesting that Dr. King contact certain prominent politicians to urge their support for funding "rent supplements" and "model citizens" programs.

Telegram from MLK to Andrew Heiskell and A. Philip Randolph

Dr. King informs Mr. Heiskell and Mr. Randolph that he will not be able to attend the emergency convocation. He also notes why this convocation is needed.

Telegram from Philip A. Randolph to MLK

Philip A. Randolph writes Dr. King concerning Negro leaders being invited to discuss problems of the movement on NBC television.

Telegram to MLK from A Phillip Randolph and Andrew Heiskell

Randolph and Heiskell request Dr. King's presence at an Urban Coalition Steering Committee Meeting in Washington.

The A. Philip Randolph Institute

The A. Philip Randolph Institute was organized to mobilize labor, religious and other groups in support of the civil rights movement. Dr. King was a member of the Advisory Board.

The Negro Speaks

Several prominent African Americans describe the issues that plague the black community. Some of these issues include poverty, segregation, civil rights and race relations.

The Prayer Pilgrimage for Freedom

This photograph encourages individuals to join the Prayer Pilgrimage for Freedom to Washington, D.C in an attempt to arouse the conscience of the nation.

The Urban Coalition

The Urban Coalition's weekly report from the National Coordinator details the newly introduced bill which provides $150 million for summer jobs and anti-poverty programs. The report further discusses the monetary inadequacies for programs involving employment, education, and recreation. A proposal is established by the Office of Economic Opportunity to adhere to the summer programs.

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