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American Committee on Africa

The American Committee on Africa (ACOA) was founded in 1953 to support African liberation struggles. Based in New York, it had a national constituency composed of students, labor and civil rights advocates, and religious leaders. ACOA lobbied the United Nations and the U.S. government on behalf of African nations, arranged meetings of African leaders in the U.S., raised funds to support various African causes and educated the American public about issues facing the African continent. Dr. King was on the national committee of the organization and participated in many of its campaigns. From 1955 to 1981, George Houser, a founder of the Congress of Racial Equality, led ACOA. In 2001 the organization merged with other sister organizations to form Africa Action.

Associated Archive Content : 14 results

1965 Human Rights Day Flyer

This flyer advertises a rally to benefit South African victims of apartheid.

Aid Victims of South Africa's Racism

Members of the American Committee on Africa solicit funding for the support and advancement of victims of Apartheid in South Africa. This brochure highlights the unjust treatment of black South Africans through individual testimonies.

American Committee On Africa Invitation to Protest Apartheid

This form letter informs and invites the recipients to attend functions sponsored by the American Committee on Africa in protest against Chase Manhattan Bank's financial relationship with the apartheid regime in South Africa.

American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa Contributors List

This is a list of the organizations that contributed to the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa.

CORE - Progress Report #1

Benjamin Brown details the structure of the latest publication from the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE). The CORE Guide to Negro History will be a composite of contributing essays, pictures, prized Negro literature and evaluations of social progress by current civil rights leaders. Beacon Press is listed as the potential publisher for the groundbreaking book.

Harry Belafonte - American Committee on Africa

Harry Belafonte sends a request for support in South Africa bringing awareness to apartheid and the injustices it entails. Belafonte implores the reader to send immediate help to the country in financial contributions, as an effort to fight racism and government corruption.

Letter from A. Phillip Randolph to MLK

A. Philip Randolph writes Dr. King requesting that he join as a sponsor in the campaign to decrease customers of the two chief banks supporting apartheid in South Africa.

Letter from Ira Edmond Gillet to MLK

Mr. Gillet, a member of the Fellowship of Reconciliation and former missionary in South Africa, sends Dr. King his thoughts on a recent petition circulated by the American Committee on Africa. He explains that the actions called for in the petition would "do more harm than good." Gillet encloses a copy of the petition, highlighted with his own comments, which implores President Kennedy to impose sanctions on South Africa.

Letter from the American Committee on Africa Regarding South Africa's Participation in the Olympics

George M. Houser, Executive Director of the American Committee on Africa, informs readers of the International Olympic Committee's upcoming meeting that will discuss the 1968 Olympics. Mr. Houser encloses a paper regarding the history of South Africa and the Olympics to help urge the committee to reconsider granting South Africa permission to participate in the Olympics.

Letter from Theodore Brown to MLK

Theodore Brown writes Dr. King requesting his signature on a telegram to President Johnson from the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa expressing disapproval of South Africa's rule over South West Africa and requesting U.S. support for turning over administration to the United Nations.

Letter from Theodore E. Brown to MLK

The Director of the American Negro Leadership Conference On Africa sent this letter to update Dr. King and other committee members about plans for the third national biennial leadership conference.

MLK's Address About South Africa

Addressing the apartheid situation in South Africa, Dr. King states that white rulers of South Africa, rather than black Africans, are "modern day barbarians." He continues to say that although black South Africans are the majority, they are oppressed by the minority. This is one of many occasions that Dr. King parallels racial injustices and views civil rights as an international issue.

Negro Leaders Urge Force Against Rhodesia

The American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa calls for all news media and wireless services to broadcast the release of "Negro Leaders Urge Force Against Rhodesia." This call to action was prompted by racial rebellions led by Ian Smith. It was the hope of civil rights leaders to strengthen "Negro" and African relations by increasing support of peace in Africa.

South African Victims of Apartheid

The American Committee on Africa hosts a human rights rally and benefit on behalf of the victims of South African Apartheid. This program provides a brief history and overall purpose of the committee and outlines the projected schedule of events.