Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

American Friends Service Committee

The American Friends Service Committee (AFSC) is an affiliate of the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers). It was founded in 1917 by Quaker conscientious objectors to assist civilian victims of World War I and to provide young conscientious objectors a means to alternative service (such as emergency medical personnel in battle zones). In 1947 it received the Nobel Peace Prize along with the British Quakers. The organization was a strong supporter of the American Civil Rights Movement. Officers of the AFSC corresponded with Dr. King and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in support of various endeavors, including the Poor People’s Campaign and opposition to the Vietnam War. The AFSC continues to remain an advocate for peace and social justice around the world.

Associated Archive Content : 60 results

Can You Live Where You Want to Live?

George and Eunice Grier write regarding the topic "Can you live where you want to live?" This article discusses discrimination and segregation in housing. The Griers assert that integration in jobs and public places is advancing, but segregation in housing still plagues many people in America.

Chicago Housing Discrimination Complaint

This official complaint to the Illinois Department of Registration and Education references a particular instance of housing discrimination that took place at the Houser Real Estate office.

Dagmar Wilson: Women Strike for Peace

This flyer informs readers about Women's Strike for Peace and details about an upcoming talk by Dagmar Wilson.

Discrimination Act by a Licensee of the Illinois Department of Registration and Education

The following is a complaint about an act of discrimination sent to the Illinois Department of Registration and Education from Mrs. McLouis Robinet and William Moyer.

Georgia Council on Human Relations: Program Highlights

This newsletter informs readers of the upheaval in the state of Georgia by reporting a variety of incidents around the state. The program focuses on events around Atlanta, including an attack in the Dixie Hills community in which two Molotov cocktails were thrown and, during the ensuing chaos, one man one was killed by a shotgun blast and three others wounded.

Joint Memorandum of Intern Regarding the Death of James Reeb

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference, the Unitarian Universalist Association, and the American Friends Service Committee have each established a James Reeb Memorial Fund. The purpose of these funds are to provide financial assistance to those who are personally involved in the struggle for equal rights. James Reeb was a white civil rights activist who was brutally murdered by white segregationists in Selma, 1965.

Letter from American Friends Service Committee to MLK

R. Ogden Hannaford and Kale A. Williams, representatives of the American Friends Service Committee, enclose a pre-publication edition of a book aimed at peacefully resolving the issues in Vietnam.

Letter from Ann B. Houston to MLK

In this letter Ann B. Houston of the American Friends Service Committee offers her gratitude for a contribution received from the Benevolence Club of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. She further states that the funds have gone to good use in South Vietnam towards the manufacture of artificial limbs using local immigrated labor.

Letter from Barbara W. Moffett to William Rutherford

Barbara Moffett discusses the possibility of coordinating efforts and collaborative participation between the American Friends Service Committee and SCLC.

Letter from Bernard LaFayette, Jr. to MLK

Before Mr. LaFayette leaves for New York to join the Spring Mobilization to end the war in Vietnam, he offer suggestions towards the housing problems that have occurred in Chicago. He states that there should be an urban renewal project that could possibly help low-income citizens afford respectable housing.

Letter from Betty D. Richardson to MLK

Betty Richardson reminds Dr. King of his speaking engagement for the American Friends Service Committee 50th Anniversary Dinner.

Letter From Birmingham City Jail

Dr. King's famous "Letter from Birmingham Jail" is a response to a statement written by several Alabama Clergymen. In that statement, the Clergymen assert that Dr. King's methods are both "unwise and untimely." They brand him an "outside agitator" who should not be advocating the breaking of the law. Dr. King responds with this Letter and politely references Biblical, Classical and early American figures to counter the arguments of the Clergymen.

Letter From Birmingham City Jail

This version of Dr. King's "Letter From Birmingham Jail," published by the American Friends Service Committee, also includes the original statement made by the clergyman that prompted Dr. King's response. The eight clergymen described Dr. King's actions as "unwise and untimely." In his response, Dr. King references biblical and historical figures to illustrate why the Civil Rights Movement can no longer wait. He also expresses his frustration with many within organized religion and the moderate white American.

Letter from Calhoun Geiger to MLK

Calhoun Geiger, director of the Peace Education Program, invites Dr. King and his family to a summer family camp hosted by the American Friends Service Committee, Inc. Geiger explains that John Yungblut suggested that Dr. King might be interested in attending.

Letter from Canadian Friend's Service Committee to MLK

Murray Thomson invites Dr. King to attend an annual conference of world diplomats in Ontario, Canada. Some of the major topics of discussion include the future of military alliances, the growing role of the United Nations, and preventing the spread of nuclear weapons.

Letter from Charles Sellers to MLK

Charles Sellers, a Professor of History at the University of California at Berkeley, writes this letter to Dr. King promoting the Washington Convocation On The National Crisis. He encloses the proposal that he and Cecil Thomas discussed with Mrs. King over the phone. The proposal details the organized effort to marshal public sentiment against current US policy in Vietnam. Five hundred prominent Americans will be invited to the convocation, to be held in Washington, DC.

Letter from Clarence E. Pickett to MLK

The American Friends Service Committee is a peace and service organization that seeks to promote social justice in the United States and around the world. Mr. Pickett, a current representative, invites Dr. King to be a part of a lecture series that will be presented in all major U.S. cities. In addition, he offers Dr. King monetary compensation for travel and hospitality accommodations.

Letter from Clarence E. Pickett, Dorothy M. Steere, and George C. Hardin

The Religious Society of Friends, which consists of 17,000 Quakers, decides to send its members to spread a message of "love and goodwill" to both whites and Negroes of Philadelphia.

Letter from Colin W. Bell to MLK

Colin W. Bell invites Dr. King to deliver a lecture during the anniversary activities of the American Friends Service Committee. This letter also includes Dora McDonald's shorthand in red ink.

Letter from Duncan Wood to MLK

This letter outlines Dr. King's upcoming trip to Moscow. The purpose of the mission is to have past Nobel Peace Prize winners partake in an initiative to promote peace in Vietnam.

Letter from Elbert Ransom Jr. to MLK

In this letter from Mr. Ransom to Dr. King the former welcomes Dr. King to "our complexed [sic] city." The author also expresses nostalgia for previous shared experiences and his hopes for the future of the movement.

Letter from F.A. Guilford to MLK

F.A. Guilford of Oxford University Press asks permission to reprint Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham City Jail" for their third edition textbook "Free Government in the Making." He further requests to obtain the world rights to the letter for worldwide distribution.

Letter from Grace Pruitt to Miss D. McDonald

Grace Pruitt writes to Ms. McDonald informing her that the American Friends Service Committee does not have a large enough stock of "Letter From Birmingham City Jail" to send her 200 copies.

Letter from Howard Moore, Jr. to MLK

Howard Moore, a partner in the Law Offices of Ward, Moore and Alexander, informs Dr. King of the establishment of the Southern Legal Assistance Project (SLAP). Mr. Moore describes how SLAP has already achieved a victory in representing a soldier who was accused of cursing his white officers. He also asks Dr. King to consider being named as an adviser for the project.

Letter From Intergroup Relations Agencies to Ivan Allen

The senders of this letter request a meeting with Atlanta Mayor Ivan Allen to discuss inadequate housing, overcrowded schools, under-employment and "minimal enforcement of the city's building code." The senders represent a variety of organizations and offer their expertise in developing solutions to the problems facing Atlanta.

Letter from Leland Stewart to MLK

Leland Stewart, of the Conference on Science and Religion, writes to Dr. King to offer support in the movement to end the war in Vietnam.

Letter from Louise A. Andrews to MLK

On behalf of the American Friends Service Committee, Louise Andrews invites Dr. King to attend and speak at one of their Regional offices in Pennsylvania or Wisconsin.

Letter from Louise Andrews Sims to MLK

Louise Andrews Sims asks Dr. King to consider providing assistance to the American Friend's Service Committee by setting aside one week for aspeaking engagement in October or November of 1963. Alternate dates could be in January through April of 1964.

Letter from Marcel Bernfeld to MLK

Mr. Bernfeld writes Dr. King, letting him know that he published some of his work. He also asks Dr. King's permission to publish the "Letter from Birmingham Jail," in its entirety, with an introduction and notes. He encloses copies of his own speech for Dr. King's reading pleasure and expresses his well-wishes in closing.

Letter from Marie Turner to MLK

In this letter Marie Turner of the American Friends Service Committee requests copies of Dr. King's "Letter from a Birmingham Jail" to be reproduced and distributed.

Pages