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American Friends Service Committee

The American Friends Service Committee (AFSC) is an affiliate of the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers). It was founded in 1917 by Quaker conscientious objectors to assist civilian victims of World War I and to provide young conscientious objectors a means to alternative service (such as emergency medical personnel in battle zones). In 1947 it received the Nobel Peace Prize along with the British Quakers. The organization was a strong supporter of the American Civil Rights Movement. Officers of the AFSC corresponded with Dr. King and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in support of various endeavors, including the Poor People’s Campaign and opposition to the Vietnam War. The AFSC continues to remain an advocate for peace and social justice around the world.

Associated Archive Content : 60 results

Letter from MLK to Clarence E. Pickett

Dr. King regretfully informs Mr. Pickett of American Friends Service Committee, he has accepted the maximum number of speaking engagements allowable for the next year or longer.

Letter from MLK to Louise Andrews

Dr. King regretfully declines a speaking invitation of the American Friends Service Committee. Mrs. Louis Andrews is informed Dr. King has already accepted the maximum allowable speaking engagements for the season.

Letter from MLK to Mother F. McMullen

Dr. King thanks Mother F. McMullen for her kind letter. Dr. King explains their goals and commitment to nonviolence in seeking brotherhood in America. He encloses a copy of his "Letter from Birmingham Jail" and expresses his appreciation for her support.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Louis Andrews Sims

Dr. King informs Mrs. Louis Andrews Sims that due to his multiple responsibilities within the SCLC and his various pastoral duties, he will not be able to accept speaking engagements at this time. He assures her that if his schedule clears up, he will be happy to accept her "gracious invitation."

Letter from Ralph Abernathy to Dr. Homer A. Jack

Ralph Abernathy follows up with Dr. Jack about a conversation they had regarding funds for the Jimmie Lee Jackson Memorial Fund. Abernathy encloses a check from the SCLC for the fund, which will provide the family of the slain civil rights protestor with a total of $70 per month. Abernathy also confirms that the fund will also provide a scholarship to Jackson's sister.

Letter from Ralph D. Abernathy to Homer A. Jack

Rev. Ralph Abernathy submits a check on behalf of the SCLC to Homer Jack of the Unitarian Universalist Association to be donated to the Jimmie Lee Jackson Memorial Fund. The money will be used to purchase a new home for Jackson's parents and to finance the education for Jackson's sister. Jimmie Lee Jackson was murdered by a Alabama State Trooper while trying to protect his mother and grandfather from a beating during a march melee in Marion, Alabama. Jackson's death initiated the push for a march from Selma to Montgomery.

Letter from SANE's Dr. Benjamin Spock to MLK

Dr. Benjamin Spock requests the support of the SCLC for "A Rally for Peace in Vietnam." Dr. Spock informs Dr. King, that the rally will advocate for immediate actions concerning the war in Vietnam.

Letter from Townsend Scudder to MLK

Townsend Scudder, of the Friends Service Committee, contacts Dr. King to request the use and reproduction of the Birmingham Letter to appear in their pamphlet.

Letter from Walter Martin to SCLC Officials

Walter Martin of the American Friends Service Committee, writes to numerous SCLC officials concerning Quaker work in Southern Africa.

Letter to MLK from Stewart Meacham

Stewart Meacham writes Dr. King about his availability to attend a conference hosted by the American Friends Service Committee at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri. He mentions the theme of the ocnference, other invited guests, and that the orgranization is prepared to cover Dr. King's travel and housing expenses.

Letter to Rev. Malcolm Calhoun to MLK

Dr. King appreciates Rev. Calhoun's concern for the SCLC and the mission the organization has for the creating equality. Dr. King then explains how other programs offer contributions to the SCLC so that they may continue to engage in education, voter registration, economic development, and training of ministers for urban ministries.

Memo from Barbara Moffett to MLK

Barbara W. Moffett writes a memorandum to Dr. King and Harry Wachtel, commenting on a second draft statement submitted by the American Friends Service Committee to the SCLC. Ms. Moffett also sends a copy of the memo with a handwritten note to Andy Young.

Mission to Mississippi : Invitation to a Conference

This document lists Dr. King and other clergymen as they invite selected religious leaders to a conference entitled "Mission to Mississippi." The Mission is in support for the Freedom Riders of 1961. It will be a one day event to be held in Jackson, Mississippi on July 20, 1961.

MLK Upon Landing at New York City

Dr. King expresses his enjoyment upon his return from India. He also gives his opinion on a few issues in India such as India's struggling economy. He first advises that Western nations should aid India in improving their economy. Then he compares the caste system to the race problem in America.

My Trip to the Land of Gandhi

Dr. King documents his travel throughout India beginning in February 1959 with his wife and Dr. Lawrence Reddick. During his stay Dr. King reflects on the manifestation of Gandhi's nonviolent teachings in low crime rates amidst the impoverished living conditions. Dr. King also addresses the notion of a "divided India," a country deliberating the varying effects of Western modernization.

Negotiation Now!

Negotiation Now is a national citizens' campaign that supports new initiatives to end the Vietnam War. The campaign aligns with the Secretary General of the United Nations, U Thant, who discusses the necessary "cessation" of bombing in North Vietnam to bring about a peaceful political compromise. This flier shares the campaign's views and offers a section for donation information.

Open Letter Regarding Chicago Real Estate Practices

Lee Brooke, of Oak Park River Forest Housing Committee near Chicago, sends an open letter to members of Congress, the Governor of Illinois and the Chairman of the Atomic Energy Commission. In it, he discusses discriminatory real estate practices in the Chicago area, and presents evidence gathered by the housing committee to show why there is a need to regulate the real estate industry.

Permission form sent via Joan Daves to Mr.Gilford to Reprint Material Pertaining to Dr.King

This form serves as a way to grant Mr.Gilford permission to reprint the "Letter from Birmingham City Jail" in the "Free Government in the Making, 3rd ed."

Poor People's Campaign News

This newsletter shares details regarding the end of a historic meeting of American minority group leaders who declared unanimous support for the Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D.C. The names of organizations and leaders pledging their support are also included.

Proposed Speaking Engagements for MLK

This document entails the dates and locations of Dr. King's proposed speaking engagements.

Report of the Insurgent Editor's Conference

These minutes of the "Insurgent Newspaper Editor's Conference" record the events of the conference from start to finish. The minutes also describe prominent topics of the conference, including the difficulties publishing an insurgent newspaper on a tight budget, reaching a large audience, and generating powerful content. The minutes end on a positive note: "a good time was had by all."

SCLC Newsletter, July-August 1964

This 1964 SCLC newsletter addresses nearly all if not all topics related to the Civil Rights Movement of the era.

SCLC Pamphlet of Articles in Rebuttal of MLK's Critics

Andrew Young, the National Executive Director of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, issued this pamphlet entitled "Does Martin Luther King, Jr. Have the Right? The Qualifications? The Duty? To Speak Out on Peace?" The pamphlet features several editorials written in defense of Dr. King that were published in the New York Times, Detroit Free Press, New York Post, and the Nation in April 1967. The pamphlet includes a statement saying the SCLC's primary focus is civil rights but they support Dr. King's right to speak his opinion regarding the Vietnam War.

Spring Mobilization Committee Roundup of Nationwide Mobilization Activity

This document outlines activities around the country leading up to the April 15 Spring Mobilization Against the War in Vietnam rally in New York City.

Statement of the Committee for Emmett Doe

The Committee for Emmett Doe issues a statement both explaining Doe's situation and also asking for support. Doe, an Army paramedic, faced court-martial for allegedly cursing a white superior. He was later acquitted of the charges.

The Sound of Freedom

The Greater Philadelphia Citizens Committee is having an event with Dr. King as their guest speaker and special musical performances by artist such as Mahalia Jackson.

The Sound of Freedom

The Greater Philadelphia Citizens Committee presents The Sound of Freedom to "demonstrate Philadelphia unity" where Dr. King is the guest speaker.

To the Gallant Black Man Now Dead

This poem titled "To The Gallant Black Men Now Dead" was written by Vincent Harding in dedication to Jimmy L. Williams. Private First Class Williams was an heroic black man killed in Vietnam and was refused burial in his hometown of Wetumpka, Alabama.

United States Commission on Civil Rights Information Bulletin

This information bulletin published by the US Commission on Civil Rights provides updates of current activities. The bulletin includes information regarding voting rights hearings, education in the south, and news from private organizations like CORE, NAACP and the Council for Civil Unity.

Youth, Nonviolence, and Social Change

The conference on "Youth, Nonviolence, and Social Change" at Howard University contains various speakers deriving from various academic disciplines. Dr. King participated in the lecture and discussed how nonviolent methods impacted individuals, especially the youth.

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