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Antioch College

Antioch College, Coretta Scott King’s alma mater, is a liberal arts college in Yellow Springs, Ohio founded in 1852 by education reformer Horace Mann. In 1863 the trustees declared they would not reject persons of color. Antioch did not begin to diversify until students of Japanese origin interned during World War II enrolled. It offered scholarships in 1943 to non-white students, the first to Coretta Scott King’s older sister Edythe. As a student, Coretta was active with the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and the college’s Race Relations and Civil Liberties committees. She graduated with a bachelor’s in music and education. In 1965, Dr. King gave the commencement address. In 2006, Antioch opened the Coretta Scott King Center for Cultural and Intellectual Freedom.

Associated Archive Content : 16 results

Advertisement for Mrs. King's Upcoming Appearance

This flyer serves as an advertisement for Mrs. Coretta Scott King's upcoming public appearance at the First African Baptist Church. Mrs. King wishes to honor every Freedom Fighter who was imprisoned during a civil rights demonstration.

Antioch College Commencement Program

This is a program for Antioch College's 1965 commencement, at which Dr. King addressed the graduating class.

Coretta Scott King - Soprano

This 1959 program features Mrs. King in concert. One section of the performance is entitled "Portrait of the Non-Violent Integration Movement in Montgomery."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dr. James P. Dixon of Antioch College

Dora McDonald writes Dr. James Dixon to express Dr. King's joy in his ability to accept Dr. Dixon's invitation to speak at Antioch College's commencement.

Letter from Dora McDonald to James McKee Concerning Antioch College Visit

Dora McDonald writes James McKee regarding the time of Dr. and Mrs. King's arrival and security arrangements for Dr. King's appearance at Antioch College.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. Jessie C. Treichler

Dora McDonald writes Mrs. Treichler to inform her that she will provide Dr. and Mrs. King arrival time at a later date. She also explains that Dr. King's physician has highly recommended that he limits his amount of events during his travels, therefore she feels sure that he will not be able to commit to all of her suggestions.

Letter from James McKee to Dora McDonald Concerning MLK's Antioch Commencement Address

James McKee, Chief of the Yellow Springs Police Department, writes Dora McDonald regarding security arrangements for Dr. King's visit to Yellow Springs, Ohio for Antioch College's Commencement.

Letter from James P. Dixon of Antioch College to MLK

James P. Dixon, President of Antioch College, thanks Dr. King for accepting an invitation to speak at the school's commencement ceremony.

Letter from James P. Dixon to MLK Requesting a Donation

In this letter, Mr. Dixon discusses his early life, his journey to Antioch College, and requests help from Dr. King in funding the same program that put Dixon through college.

Letter from Jessie Treichler of Antioch College to Coretta Scott King

On behalf of Antioch College, Jessie Treichler invites Dr. King to speak and Mrs. King to perform at the college. She informs Mrs. King of the honorarium and requests a tentative response.

Letter from Mary R. Hunt to Mrs.King Regarding Recommendation for Employment

Ms. Hunt, Director of the Extramural Department for Antioch College, sends Mrs. King the resume and photo of Dixie Lee Kisor for employment consideration.

Letter from MLK to Jessie Treichler

Dr. King writes Jessie Tresichler to inform her that he and his wife will be unable to accept her invitation to Antioch College. He explains that his calendar will not allow him to accept any more speaking engagements and that Coretta is an expecting mother.

Letter from Richard Landau of Antioch College to MLK

Richard Landau, Editor of The Antiochian, writes Dr. King requesting a photograph and "biographical data sheet" for a story about his upcoming appearance as the commencement speaker.

Letter from the Morrissetts to MLK and Mrs. King

Elizabeth Morrissett wishes the King family a Merry Christmas. Mrs. Morrisset also invites Dr. King to come speak at a Purdue University Convocation.

MLK's Speaking Itinerary

This list of speaking engagements documents Dr. King's busy schedule, in June 1965.

Non-Violence Takes Courage: King's Wife

Mrs. Coretta Scott King elaborates on her commitment to nonviolence, referring to it as "the best instrument of change," throughout her involvement in the Civil Rights and Peace Movements.