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Shuttlesworth, Fred L.

b. 1922 - d. 2011

Born in Mount Meigs, Alabama, Fred Shuttlesworth became pastor of Bethel Baptist Church in Birmingham in 1953. When Alabama banned the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) in 1956, Shuttlesworth organized the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights (ACMHR). Later that year, his home was bombed. Shuttlesworth helped found the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) in 1957. He and his wife Ruby were beaten trying to enroll their children in school. In 1963, the SCLC joined Shuttlesworth in leading Project C (confrontation) to challenge segregation in Birmingham. Public Safety Commissioner Bull Connor responded to demonstrators with fire hoses, dogs and billy clubs. Hundreds, including children, were arrested. The images of police brutality shocked the nation, led to the integration of public spaces in Birmingham and prompted President Kennedy to submit legislation that became the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Shuttlesworth became pastor of Greater New Light Baptist Church in Cincinnati in 1966.

Associated Archive Content : 79 results

A Statement to the South and Nation

The Southern Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration issued this statement. The document states that a world-wide campaign for social and political freedom shows an international plight for human dignity. As America is one of the two most powerful nations in the world, "the unresolved problem of civil rights becomes the most crucial issue." There is contradiction between the freedom America proclaims and the actual practice of civil liberties and democracy. Dr.

A Statement to the South and Nation

This seemingly unexceptional document signifies the birth of the SCLC. Dr. King, Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth and Rev. C. K. Steele assembled a consortium of leaders in Atlanta following the end of the Montgomery Bus Boycott. The Southern Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration issued this statement that addresses the intimidation, discrimination and economic disparity Negroes face in the South. The statement appeals to the federal government to intervene against assaults that block basic civil rights.

A Statement to the South and the Nation

The Southern Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration issued this statement to the nation regarding the unresolved problems of civil rights. The leaders asked for all Negroes, particularly those in the South, to assert their human dignity and to seek justice by rejecting all injustices.

Address by Jackie Robinson at SCLC Freedom Dinner

Guest speaker Jackie Robinson discusses his personal struggles with adopting the philosophy of nonviolence, race relations and the far-reaching efforts of the SCLC.

Affidavit of Captain George Wall

George Wall, Captain of the Police Department for the City of Birmingham, submits an affidavit. The document states that a group of thirty-two Negroes led by Charles Billups and Fred Shuttlesworth were arrested for marching without a permit.

Affidavit of Theo R. Wright

In an attempt to redirect the focus of Negro students in Birmingham, Superintendent Theo R. Wright presents a sworn affidavit detailing his responsibilities and plans to revitalize the educational direction of Birmingham Public Schools.

Article: "MLK Writes Co-Religionists from Jail"

The Witness Magazine published the first of Dr. King's "Letter from a Birmingham Jail." The second part will appear in the next issue on June 27, 1963. The article describes Dr. King's letter as "one of those rare 'to-read-twice' documents."

Back Our Brothers: First Annual Awards Banquet

Dr. King, Ralph Abernathy, Wyatt Walker and Fred Shuttlesworth were honored at a special banquet in New York City, following SCLC's successful 1963 Birmingham campaign.

Bill of Complaint: City Board of Education of Birmingham, Alabama

The City Board of Education of Birmingham, Alabama accuses several civil rights leaders and organizations of discouraging Negro students from attending public schools.

Birmingham Manifesto

This manifesto details the methods, accomplishments, failures and reasons for the use and postponement of direct action tactics in Birmingham, Alabama.

Birmingham Manifesto

This manifesto details the methods, accomplishments, failures and reasons for the use and postponement of direct action tactics in Birmingham, Alabama by the African American community and the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights.

Carlisle's Variety Shop Souvenir Booklet

Carlisle Variety Shop produced this souvenir booklet advertising Negro businesses but also honoring Dr. King and other SCLC officials involved in the 1963 Birmingham campaign.

Civil Rights Photographic Series

These fifteen photographs chronicle several historical moments in the Civil Rights Movement.

Freedom Rally

This document is the program for the Freedom Rally held at Vermont Avenue Baptist in support of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Funeral Service for Mrs. Sharon Joann Moss

Sharon Joann Moss, wife of Otis Moss Jr., passes at an early age and is given a funeral service which includes numerous members from the civil rights movement. Dr. King delivered the eulogy for the service and many other prominent members operated as pall bearers.

Greetings Page-SCLC and ACMHR

The SCLC and the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights come together to host SCLC's annual convention in Birmingham, Alabama.

Helping Across the South

Operation Freedom is an organization that originally began in west Tennessee to aid African Americans that were wrongly evicted from their homes due to the white power structure. The committees of Operation Freedom have expanded to other southern states where their help is needed.

House Un-American Activities Committee

This article summarizes the consequences that derive from the House Un-American Activities Committee labeling Civil Rights leaders as communists.

Letter from Asbury Howard to MLK

Asbury Howard, Vice President of the International Union of Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, informs Dr. King of the harassment and attacks their union has endured for several years. He explains the 1949 indictment of officers from the union on charges of "falsely signing non-Communist affidavits." The case was dormant until government brought the case to trial in 1959 during a strike of 40,000 allied worker and copper miners. Howard cites this as evidence of union busting. He requests Dr. King's commentary and encloses a pamphlet regarding the case.

Letter from Autieve Smith of Revelation Baptist Church to MLK

Autieve Smith writes on behalf of Revelation Baptist Church to express their happiness in Dr. King's acceptance in being a part of their program with the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights Choir. Smith informs Dr. King of the time and place of his address and asks that he provide the committee with the needed information to plan his accommodations.

Letter from Benjamin E. Smith to MLK

This report highlights a Birmingham conference on the "Ways and Means to Integrate the Deep South" sponsored by the Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc. This conference included several hundred white and black leaders who sought to integrate the South.

Letter from Birmingham Jail

In this copy printed in "The Christian Century," Dr. King writes his letter in response to several Alabama Clergymen who accuse him of being unwise and untimely. His accusers call him an extremist and an "outside agitator" who should not be in Alabama. Dr. King references several sources in his counter to their arguments.

Letter from Clarence B. Jones to the Editor of New York Times

Clarence Jones writes the editor of the New York Times to comment on a statement made by James Reston. According to Mr. Jones the statement was factually inaccurate and partially paraphrased.

Letter from Clarence Henry to Robert F. Kennedy

Clarence Henry requests the immediate surveillance of Fred Shuttleworth's home by Kennedy's office in lieu of Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth's arrest.

Letter from Edwina Smith to Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth

Ms. Edwina Smith writes Reverend Shuttlesworth regarding a SCLC meeting and encloses a round trip plane ticket.

Letter from John H. Telfer to MLK

Mr. Telfer, a 6th grade teacher, offers his sincerest gratitude for Dr. King and his efforts to eradicate injustice. He includes an additional thanks to Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth, a fellow civil rights leader.

Letter from Larry T. Wimmer to MLK

Larry T. Wimmer, Assistant Professor at Brigham Young University, writes Dr. King seeking information regarding his views on communism and the Civil Rights Movement. He also asks if it is possible to obtain any films regarding the Civil Rights Movement and Dr. King's leadership.

Letter from MLK and Associates to Mr. Grover Hall

Dr. King and associates write to Grover Hall, Editor of the Montgomery Advertiser, to express appreciation for an article the publication carried. The clergymen state that "law and order can be restored" if other periodicals throughout the South follow the newspaper's example.

Letter from MLK and Others to President Dwight D. Eisenhower

A group of Southern religious leaders write to President Eisenhower concerning the extreme violence directed towards Negro people throughout the South. They request his immediate action to address the nation's moral and legal framework sustained by the presiding racial climate.

Letter from MLK to Vice President Richard Nixon

Dr. King and fellow clergymen commend Vice President Nixon on his work bringing attention to the suffering Hungarian refugees in Austria. They urge him to take a similar trip to the South and meet with the thousands of victims of racial oppression.

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