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Steele, C. Kenzie

b. 1914 - d. 1980

C. K. (Charles Kenzie) Steele was born in Bluefield, West Virginia. Ordained as a Baptist minister in 1935, he continued his education at Morehouse College. He served churches in Montgomery, Alabama and Augusta, Georgia before becoming pastor of Bethel Baptist Church in Tallahassee, Florida in 1952. While head of the local chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), Steele was elected president of the Inter-Civic Council, an organization modeled after the Montgomery Improvement Association that directed a successful bus boycott in Tallahassee in 1956. Steele was elected first vice president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) when it was founded in 1957. A close friend of Dr. King who shared his commitment to achieving social equality through nonviolence, Steele led demonstrations in Albany, Georgia when King was in jail.

Associated Archive Content : 32 results

A Statement to the South and Nation

This seemingly unexceptional document signifies the birth of the SCLC. Dr. King, Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth and Rev. C. K. Steele assembled a consortium of leaders in Atlanta following the end of the Montgomery Bus Boycott. The Southern Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration issued this statement that addresses the intimidation, discrimination and economic disparity Negroes face in the South. The statement appeals to the federal government to intervene against assaults that block basic civil rights.

A Statement to the South and Nation

The Southern Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration issued this statement. The document states that a world-wide campaign for social and political freedom shows an international plight for human dignity. As America is one of the two most powerful nations in the world, "the unresolved problem of civil rights becomes the most crucial issue." There is contradiction between the freedom America proclaims and the actual practice of civil liberties and democracy. Dr.

A Statement to the South and the Nation

The Southern Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration issued this statement to the nation regarding the unresolved problems of civil rights. The leaders asked for all Negroes, particularly those in the South, to assert their human dignity and to seek justice by rejecting all injustices.

Institute of Non-Violence and Social Change: Reformation for Freedom

This 1957 program with the theme "Dignity with Humility, Love with Courage and Justice without Violence" details an event of the Institute of Non-Violence and Social Change, in which Dr. King is featured as a guest speaker. Though his affiliation is listed as President of Montgomery's Improvement Association, Dr. King appeared as leader of the nascent Southern Christian Leadership Conference, formed January 10, 1957.

Letter from Donald Louis Anderson to MLK

Donald Louis Anderson, member of the Democratic Party in Pittsburgh, writes to Dr. King to request his endorsement of their political movement in the South.

Letter from John Due Jr. to MLK

Mr. Due writes Dr. King to offer his services as a Field Representative for the SCLC. He provides a summary of his Civil Rights background along with a list of character references.

Letter from MLK and Associates to Mr. Grover Hall

Dr. King and associates write to Grover Hall, Editor of the Montgomery Advertiser, to express appreciation for an article the publication carried. The clergymen state that "law and order can be restored" if other periodicals throughout the South follow the newspaper's example.

Letter from MLK and Others to H. Brownell

Dr. King and other prominent clergymen "urgently request" a conference with U.S. Attorney General Brownell to discuss discrimination against bus passengers.

Letter from MLK and Others to President Dwight D. Eisenhower

A group of Southern religious leaders write to President Eisenhower concerning the extreme violence directed towards Negro people throughout the South. They request his immediate action to address the nation's moral and legal framework sustained by the presiding racial climate.

Letter from MLK to Vice President Richard Nixon

Dr. King and fellow clergymen commend Vice President Nixon on his work bringing attention to the suffering Hungarian refugees in Austria. They urge him to take a similar trip to the South and meet with the thousands of victims of racial oppression.

Letter from Southern Negro Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration to Henry Brownell

The Southern Negro Leaders Conference on Transportation and Nonviolent Integration request a conference with U.S. Attorney General Brownell to discuss the federal government's plans.

Letter to Rev. Thomas Thrasher from MLK and Others

Dr. King and other civil rights leaders contact the President of the Montgomery Ministerial Association, Rev. Thomas Thrasher, to compliment him on his statement subsequent to the bombings in Alabama.

Letter to the Montgomery Advertiser

The Southern Negro Leaders Conference expresses their appreciation to the Montgomery Advertiser.

List of SCLC Board Members

This document is a list of all board members of the SCLC.

Mass Meeting Featuring MLK

This document is a program for a mass meeting sponsored by the SCLC and the Raleigh Citizens Association. Dr. King is the principal speaker of this meeting.

Montgomery Improvement Association Press Release About Emergency Conference

This press release from the Montgomery Improvement Association discusses an emergency conference called to address strategies for the integrated transportation campaign.

Press Release for the Southern Negro Leaders Conference

Dr. King, Rev. C.K. Steele, and Rev. F. L. Shuttlesworth called for an emergency conference to strategize and unify further bus desegregation efforts in the south. This is the press release announcing the meeting of the Southern Negro Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-violent Integration. The agenda was ambitious, but specific and explicit. One of the outcomes of the meeting was the formation of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, with Dr. King chosen to lead.

Revolt Without Violence - The Negroes' New Strategy

In this 1960 U.S. News & World Report article, Dr. King discusses the lunch counter sit-in movement spurring across the American South, the nonviolent approach to civil rights demonstrations, and the evolving status of the Negro.

SCLC Annual Conference Registration

Wyatt Tee Walker, Executive Director of the SCLC, sent this letter to associates of the SCLC prior to the 1961 Annual Convention held in Nashville, Tennessee. The letter included registration cards for the event with a request to RSVP immediately.

SCLC Annual Meeting

This program outlines the schedule of events for SCLC's 1961 annual meeting.

SCLC Board Members

This document lists the SCLC's executive board of 53 members.

SCLC Brochure: This is SCLC

SCLC outlines its history, achievements, initiatives and leadership in this brochure.

SCLC Financial Report

Ralph D. Abernathy releases the Southern Christian Leadership Conference Annual Fiscal Report for 1962-1963.

SCLC Newsletter: September 1962

This SCLC Newsletter includes several articles written by Dr. King and Wyatt Tee Walker. Some of the article titles include: "The Terrible Cost of The Ballot" and "THE CONGO, U.S.A. Albany, Georgia."

SCLC Seventh Annual Convention

This pamphlet advertises the 1963 Southern Christian Leadership Conference Annual Convention. It contains detailed information about the event, including members of the planning committee and scheduled presenters.

SCLC Seventh Annual Convention Brochure

This document is a program from the SCLC's Seventh Annual Convention in Richmond, Virginia. The event was hosted by Curtis Harris, president of the Virginia unit of the SCLC.

Southern Leaders Conference letter to Eisenhower

Ministers meeting at the Southern Negro Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration co-signed this letter to Pres. Eisenhower.

Tallahassee's Inter-Civic Council, Inc. Presents MLK

This document contains a program for Tallahassee's Inter-Civic Council's mass planning meeting for a three-day workshop on nonviolence at Bethel Baptist Church. Also included in this document are lyrics to "Lift Every Voice and Sing," and "We Shall Overcome."

Telegram from C.K. Steele to MLK

Rev. Steele expresses his appreciation for Dr. King's career and assures Dr. King that he is not walking alone.

The Deep South in Social Revolution

The Deep South in Social Revolution was the theme for the 1961 SCLC Annual Meeting.

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