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Congress of Racial Equality

In 1942, members of the Fellowship of Reconciliation met at the University of Chicago to discuss how to challenge racism and segregation. Out of these meetings the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) was formed. CORE’s early leaders sought to apply Gandhi’s method of nonviolence in the struggle to end segregation in the U.S. CORE grew to become one of the leading civil rights organizations. CORE pioneered the Freedom Rides, growing from the 1947 Journey of Reconciliation to the 1961 effort that brought an end to discrimination in interstate travel. It was active in the campaigns against discrimination in Chicago public housing. CORE helped organize the 1963 March on Washington and participated in the 1964 Freedom Summer.

Associated Archive Content : 136 results

MLK Address at the 53rd National Convention of the NAACP

This document is Dr. King's address to the 53rd Annual Convention of the NAACP in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. King discusses the following myths in this address: time will solve all problems, education can only solve problems of racial conflict, the Negro vote can do little to alter present conditions, and the practice of nonviolence is ineffective. Dr. King also speaks on "disunity," and states "the law may not make a man love me, but it may keep him from lynching me."

MLK Announces New Appointment

Dr. King announces the immediate appointment of Jesse Jackson as the Director of Special Projects and Economic Development for SCLC. The new department will focus on "stimulating the development and expansion of Negro businesses and services."

MLK Press Statement After Receiving Nobel Prize

Dr. King issued this statement to the press upon return from receiving the Nobel Peace Prize in Norway. In addition to declaring how he plans to distribute his prize winnings, Dr. King discusses the progress of the Civil Rights Movement.

Negro Leaders On "Meet the Press"

This is a transcription of the Meet the Press interview with Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, Roy Wilkins, and other leaders representing civil rights organizations. The nationally broadcasted news segment covered many pertinent social topics including demonstrations and riots, city movements, the Vietnam War, and the progression of the Civil Rights Movement. The interview structure consisted of a panel, which prompted relevant questions, and moderator Edwin Newman.

News from Southern Conference Educational Fund

The SCEF Executive Board asserts that the attack of black power is injuring the plight of democracy in the United States. The SCEF board declared "the idea of black power has a long and honorable history but it is currently being misrepresented in the news media in the United States."

Newsmakers Interview with MLK

Los Angeles' Channel 2 interviews Dr. King for its Newsmakers program. Topics include King's call for a negotiated settlement in Vietnam and the resulting criticism by other civil rights leaders, plans for mass demonstrations in Los Angeles on the poverty bill, King's position on the armed group called the Deacons and his commitment to nonviolence, and how he responds to the personal threats on his life.

Pathos and Hope

Dr. King writes about his trip to the Mississippi Delta. He reflects on the resolve and spirit of the people, who despite all odds are fighting for social justice and change.

Pathos and Hope

Dr. King speaks about a trip to the Mississippi Delta where he first witnessed hope and pathos simultaneously.

Philadelphia Chapter of CORE Flyer

This flyer encourages participation in the reformation of the Philadelphia School System.

Report on Workshop for the Huntsville Movement

This is a report about the civil rights movement in Huntsville, Alabama in the early 1960's. Hank Thomas, a CORE Field Representative, cultivated a group of students from Alabama A & M to conduct sit-ins and non-violent demonstrations at local businesses.

Review on "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community" 1967

The Virginia Kirkus Review wrote this descriptive review on Dr. King's final book, Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community? The context of the review shows differences between the messages of Dr. King's earlier works and Where Do We Go From Here. Dr. King's earlier publications focused on the work of gaining decent treatment and basic civil rights for black Americans. However, this book heavily challenged the status quo in America.

Revolt Without Violence - The Negroes' New Strategy

In this 1960 U.S. News & World Report article, Dr. King discusses the lunch counter sit-in movement spurring across the American South, the nonviolent approach to civil rights demonstrations, and the evolving status of the Negro.

Robert F. Thorne's Response to the SCLC

Robert F. Thorne expresses his commitment to the civil rights cause, but will discontinue his financial contributions to the SCLC due to Dr. King's statements regarding the Vietnam War.

SCLC Annual Meeting

This program outlines the schedule of events for SCLC's 1961 annual meeting.

SCLC Minutes

This undated and unsigned memorandum functions essentially as minutes for an SCLC strategy session.

SCLC News Bulletin

This SCLC bulletin to supporters details the organization's progress in numerous locations, including its growing presence in northern cities such as Cleveland, Operation Breadbasket in Chicago, and the Citizenship Education Program. A "Fiscal Facts" section stresses that Dr. King receives no salary from SCLC, nor any other income from his work with the organization.

SCLC Newsletter: February 1964

This SCLC newsletter covers items ranging from Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize nomination to voter registration drives throughout the country. The lead photo features national civil rights leaders "summoned to the White House for a special conference with President Lyndon B. Johnson."

SCLC Newsletter: June-July 1965

The cover story for this 1965 SCLC Newsletter features Dr. King leading a March in Chicago, and also includes the usual wide gamut of Civil Rights Movement issues. Editor Ed Clayton's column discusses the "loss of fear" among Negroes, who "never again will be systematically excluded from office, or driven back from the voting booth."

SCLC Newsletter: March 1963

This is the SCLC's 1963 Spring Newsletter. Articles include: "The 22 Billion Dollar Giant" and "Solid Wall of Segregation Cracks at Albany."

SCLC Newsletter: March 1963

SCLC highlights its affiliate activities, fundraisers and efforts to rebuild burned churches in this newsletter from March of 1963. One of the cover stories focuses on the repeal of segregation laws in Albany, Georgia. The "Profile of the Month" article features Milton A. Reid and discusses his contributions to the Civil Rights Movement.

SCLC Newsletter: September 1961

This September 1961 SCLC newsletter opens with a description of the Annual Convention scheduled to take place later that month in Nashville, Tennessee. The next section includes brief biographies of Harry Belefonte and South African singer Miriam Makeba, both slated to star in the convention's opening benefit concert. This section also outlines the advances SCLC made in its Leadership Training Program and future plans for the Citizenship Program, dedicated to increasing literacy in southern states.

SCLC North Carolina Field Report

Golden Frinks, a SCLC field secretary who represented the New Bern, North Carolina chapter, releases a field report. This report discusses the SCLC Action Program in North Carolina, and includes a monthly overview of the SCLC's contributions.

Selma to Montgomery Commemorative Rally Suggestion

This outline features a tentative agenda, statement of purpose, and key logistical information pertaining to the commemorative rally celebrating the completion of the 1965 Selma to Montgomery March.

Speech to the Freedom Riders

King delivered this speech, in Montgomery, Alabama, in 1961, at a rally to support the Freedom Riders. King encourages them to maintain postures and attitudes of non-violence in the face of violent responses to their actions and resistance. He assures them that while they will experience a "season of suffering," the moral rightness of their cause will prevail.

Speeches by the Leaders

In this booklet, the NAACP compiled famous speeches from the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Included are speeches from A. Philip Randolph, Roy Wilkins, James Farmer, Rev. Eugene Carson Blake, Rabbi Joachim Prinz, Whitney M. Young, Matthew Ahmann, John Lewis, Walter Reuther, and Dr. King. The booklet concludes with a pledge and a picture of the throng of supporters that attended the event. test

Statement by Floyd McKissick

This is information sheet is about the National Director of CORE, Floyd McKissick's statement on the Vietnam's War. In addition to other topics, he is scheduled to discuss the immorality of the conflict by drawing "parallels between self determination for the people of Vietnam and the quest for equality for Black Americans."

Statement from Jack Wood Jr. to the National Association of Housing Cooperatives

Wood commends President Johnson for his call for a Fair Housing Act and the Demonstration Cities Act of 1966 that would provide funds for rehabilitation of urban ghettoes. However, he laments the fact that they are separate bills and the government is accepting applications for the Demonstration Cities program absent a Fair Housing Act.

Statement on CORE Supportive Action Against Variety Chain Store Discrimination in the South

The Congress of Racial Equality issues a statement regarding economic boycotts of chain stores in the North that have segregated stores in the South. These boycotts are in support of desegregation efforts in the South.

Tallahassee's Inter-Civic Council, Inc. Presents MLK

This document contains a program for Tallahassee's Inter-Civic Council's mass planning meeting for a three-day workshop on nonviolence at Bethel Baptist Church. Also included in this document are lyrics to "Lift Every Voice and Sing," and "We Shall Overcome."

Telegram from Floyd B. McKissick to MLK

In this telegram, Floyd B. McKissick tells Dr. King that he will not be able to attend a march and rally in Chicago due to his schedule.

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