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Ebony

Ebony, the best known magazine for black Americans, was founded by John H. Johnson and has published continuously since the autumn of 1945. A digest-sized sister magazine, Jet, is also published by Johnson Publishing. From September 1957 through December 1958, Dr. King wrote a monthly column for Ebony called Advice for Living on issues ranging from race relations to personal ethics. King also wrote articles for Ebony: My Trip to the Land of Gandhi (July 1959), What Happened to Hell? (January 1961), Dreams of Brighter Tomorrows (March 1965), The Un-Christian Christian (August 1965) and Nonviolence: The Only Road to Freedom (October 1966). Johnson Publishing provided financial support to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) and joined its Support a Worker program.

Associated Archive Content : 16 results

A Memo from the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE)

This memorandum written by Lincoln Lynch, Associate Director of the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE), outlines proposed travel arrangements, speakers, workshop topics and entertainment for the upcoming National Convention.

Advice for Living

Dr. King addresses questions in the "Advice for Living" column published in Ebony Magazine on February 12, 1958.

Chicago Freedom Fund Festival

The Chicago Freedom Fund Festival, organized by Mahalia Jackson, served as a benefit for the SCLC.

Ebony: Advice For Living

Dr. King answers readers' questions regarding family dynamics, the NAACP, outer versus inner beauty and the image of Negroes in literature and the media. He advocates for open communication and pleasant attitudes in familial relationships, and he offers hope that the portrayal of Negroes in movies and "other public channels" is improving.

Letter from Ann Pagenstecher to MLK

Ann Pagenstecher from Harvard College Library offers Dr. King a copy of a bibliography that lists publications, both, by and about him. She shares supportive words with Dr. King, applauding his crusade regardless of the outcome. The attached bibliography contains a brief biography of Dr. King's life and seven pages of literature including books and articles from prominent publications such as Ebony Magazine, The New York Times, and The Christian Century.

Letter From Charles L. Sanders to MLK

In this letter, Sanders recommends William Rutherford to Dr. King for a position with SCLC.

Letter from Hazel Gregory to MLK

Hazel Gregory, on behalf of the Montgomery Improvement Association, asks Dr. King about transportation to the March on Washington. She also commends him on his recent article published in "Ebony." Dr. King was president of the Montgomery Improvement Association from 1955 to 1960. The organization was founded after the arrest of Rosa Parks, which sparked the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that she has spoken to Harper & Row about advertising. She expects that advertisements in "Ebony" and in "The Amsterdam News" will run on July 2nd and 16th.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Joan Daves sends Dr. King an advertisement for "Why We Can't Wait", which will appear in the Washington Afro-American. The advertisement has also been published in Ebony magazine.

Letter from Negro Non-Commissioned Officers to Civil Rights Leaders

The non-commissioned officers of Fort Polk write major civil rights organizations and publications to share their story of segregation and discrimination in the town of Leesville. The authors hope that their letter will be published - exposing the injustices.

Letter from Virginia M. Burke & Phyllis M. Banks to MLK

Virginia Burke and Phyllis Banks express their interest in distributing "The Negro Is Your Brother", better known as "Letter from Birmingham Jail", to Wisconsin leaders to inform them of the goals and aspirations of Dr. King and his following. Burke and Banks explain that while the document had appeared in multiple publications, they feel that it has yet to reach the wide audience it deserves. They ask Dr. King's permission to reprint and distribute the document if he holds the copyright.

Meet the Press Interview

This is a transcript of NBC television's Meet the Press interview with Dr. King in August 1967 with Edwin Newman as moderator. King answered questions about his views on the Vietnam conflict, nonviolence, and the presidency of Lyndon B. Johnson.

Nonviolence: The Only Road to Freedom

In this article, Dr. King argues that the American Negro's salvation will be reached by "rejecting the racism, materialism and violence that has characterized Western civilization" and working instead toward a world of brotherhood and cooperation. The civil rights leader denounces recent violent uprisings in urban ghettos, as they only contribute to the growing frustrations and issues perpetuating America's racial divide.

Prayer Pilgrimage

Various quotes are cited surrounding Dr. King's perception on love, nonviolence, spirituality, Montgomery, and more. Dr. King elaborates on the history of Montgomery and its direct relation to slavery. Ebony Magazine releases the exclusive eight-point "Plan for Freedom" for Montgomery, calling Negros to mobilize for an all-out assault on segregation."The Death of Evil' is also cited which correlates such evil with details from the book of Exodus.

Telegram from Dora McDonald to Hans Massaquoi

In this telegram, Dora McDonald writes to Mr. Massaquoi from Ebony Magazine, informing him that Dr. King is not left handed.

Volunteers Serving Program

This report highlights the voluntary efforts of programs serving for social justice along with numerous SCLC contributions.