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Fellowship of Reconciliation (U.S.)

In 1914, on the eve of World War I, an ecumenical conference was held in Germany by Christians seeking to prevent the impending war. Out of this meeting came the Fellowship of Reconciliation (FOR), a movement of conscientious objection to war rooted in the conviction that love has the power to transform conflict. The movement spread to 40 different countries and involved members of all major faith traditions. Organizations that grew out of FOR include the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE), the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) and the American Committee on Africa (ACOA). Dr. King formally joined the FOR in Montgomery, Alabama in 1958. He worked and corresponded with FOR leaders A. J. Muste, Norman Thomas, Howard Thurman, Glenn Smiley, Bayard Rustin, Jim Lawson, James Farmer, John Nevin Sayre, Muriel Lester, Edwin Dahlberg and Thich Nhat Hanh.

Associated Archive Content : 33 results

A Historian Looks at Our Political Morality

Liberal historian Henry Steele Commager writes on the political morality of the United States. He asserts that the United States is not above the historical tendency to become corrupt, and the issue will become more important as the United States grows more powerful. He argues that the United States must reconcile the "principles of law and of morality."

A Perspective for Christian Peace Concern

Brewster Kneen writes about the roles that Christians and the church play in the peace-making process. He cites Saint Peter and Saint Luke to support his argument.

American Clergymen's Committee for Vietnamese War Relief

The American Clergymen's Committee for Vietnamese War Relief requests that Dr. King join them in sending medical supplies to North Vietnam. They also explain the difficulties they are receiving from the government to obtain a Treasury Department License which would enable them to assist in the war relief. Lastly, the committee informs Dr. King of how other churches have made generous contributions to help with relief for the Vietnam War.

Atlanta Workshop in Nonviolence Newsletter

This newsletter, Volume I Number 4, is published by Henry and Sue Bass of Atlanta. They write about the Atlanta Peace Parade, an anti-Vietnam protest to take place on August 6, 1967. The Atlanta Peace Parade would become the south's first major peace parade, about which the Basses write President Johnson was worried, calling for counter-demonstrations.

Fellowship of Reconciliation Campaign Proposal

The Fellowship of Reconciliation announces its "Thanksgiving-To-Tet" campaign and includes details of the types of aid that will be given to the people of Vietnam.

Is Dialogue Alien to Marxism?" (Polemics)

Czech philosopher Julius Tomin discusses the role of dialogue within Marxist discourse. Critiquing the position set forth by Milan Machovec in his text "Sense of Life," Tomin outlines the the definition of dialogue, the climate necessary for a dialogue to occur, and the role of dialogue in the humanization of men.

Is Nonviolence Effective

Rev. P. R. Regamey writes a paper that discusses whether or not nonviolence is effective. He uses Gandhi's methods as a basis for the paper. Rev. Regamey also addresses the broader theory and practice of nonviolence.

Letter from Bo Wirmark to MLK

Bo Wirmark writes Dr. King to clarify the misconception behind Vilgot Sjoman's film "I Am Curious (Yellow)," and explain how his interview is being used in the film. Wirmark also extends an invitation for Dr. King to visit Uppsala, Sweden.

Letter from Earl Smith to MLK about Portugeese Translation of "Strength to Love"

Earl M. Smith writes to Dr. King requesting permission to translate and publish the book "Strength to Love" in Portuguese. Mr. Smith states that a Fellowship of Reconciliation representative can be responsible for translating.

Letter from Edouard Theis to MLK

Mr. Theis makes reference of having spoke to a French group of non-violent Christians about Dr. King's struggle for freedom. Mr. Theis suggests a reproduction of "Letter From The Birmingham Jail" as well as the distribution of the French translation as a chapter in a French Nonviolent Action book.

Letter from Glenn E. Smiley to MLK

In this letter, Mr. Smiley requests an endorsement from Dr. King on the creation of a non-violent training film by The Fellowship of Reconciliation.

Letter from Glenn Smiley to MLK

The Fellowship of Reconciliation asks Dr. King for assistance in obtaining a license to ship medical aid to North and South Vietnam.

Letter from Grace Pruitt to Miss D. McDonald

Grace Pruitt writes to Ms. McDonald informing her that the American Friends Service Committee does not have a large enough stock of "Letter From Birmingham City Jail" to send her 200 copies.

Letter from Helga Gulbrandsen to MLK

Helga Gulbrandsen invites Dr. King to speak for the Norwegian Fellowship in Oslo, Norway.

Letter from Ira Edmond Gillet to MLK

Mr. Gillet, a member of the Fellowship of Reconciliation and former missionary in South Africa, sends Dr. King his thoughts on a recent petition circulated by the American Committee on Africa. He explains that the actions called for in the petition would "do more harm than good." Gillet encloses a copy of the petition, highlighted with his own comments, which implores President Kennedy to impose sanctions on South Africa.

Letter from Jean and Hildegard Goss-Mayr to MLK

Jean and Hildegard Goss-Mayr, of the International Fellowship of Reconciliation, invite Dr. King to speak at a meeting in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. They also congratulate him on winning the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Jerome Davis to MLK

Jerome Davis invites Dr. King to receive the Gandhi Peace Award. The Gandhi Foundation wants to give Dr. King the award alongside U.S. Senator Fulbright.

Letter from Lillian Robertson to MLK

The Baptist Pacifist Fellowship confirms that Dr. King will speak at its upcoming annual meeting. Lillian Robertson, Secretary-Treasurer of the Fellowship, also encloses a brochure about the organization.

Letter from MLK to Dr. E.F.S. Davies

Dr. King recognizes the significant work of fellow activist A.J. Muste and the Fellowship of Reconciliation. He states that he is a diligent member of the organization and pledges his full fledged support to Muste's leadership.

Letter from MLK to John L. Tilley

Dr. King is requesting the use of Morehouse College for a three-day conference of southern leaders. The conference will be sponsored by the SCLC and the Fellowship of Reconciliation. Target issues include nonviolence and social action.

Letter from MLK to Raymond Beard

Dr. King thanks Raymond Beard for his statement on peace and Christianity. He believes that the Fellowship of Reconciliation can distribute Beard's message to fellow clergyman around the country. In Dr. King's view, "...we must embark upon positive programs of international aid and amity to strenghten the bonds of world community and to eliminate the conditions which historically have led nations to start wars."

Letter from Ralph J. Bunch to Raphael Gould

Though Ralph J. Bunche agrees with the "Unique Value and Importance of Education for Peace", he is unsure to the effectiveness of the principle.

Letter from Raphael Gould to Dora McDonald Re Thich Nhat Hanh

Raphael Gould, of The Fellowship of Reconciliation, writes to Miss McDonald requesting a letter from Dr. King nominating Thich Nhat Hanh for the Nobel Peace Prize. Mr. Gould calls attention to the approaching deadline and the extensive documentation that must accompany the letter.

Letter from Ruth Decker to MLK

Ruth Decker acknowledges her complete support to organizations such as the Southern Conference Education Fund and the Fellowship of Reconciliation. She encloses a generous gift to Dr. King to aid in his struggle for peace and compares his dilemma to Gandhi's situation.

Letter from Susan Agrest to MLK

Susan Agrest of Harcourt, Brace & World, Inc. requests Dr. King's permission to reprint "Letter from Birmingham City Jail" in a book that will be published.

Raphael Gould Thanks MLK For Support

Gould thanks Dr. King for his letter of support to the Clergymen's Emergency Committee in Vietnam. Gould further approves of King's dialogue printed in Playboy Magazine and encourages him to go on late night TV interview shows to reach a larger population of Americans.

Report of A Participant

This report illustrates the authors concern and outlook on the Vietnam war.

Telegram from Thich Nhat Hanh to MLK

Thich Nhat Hanh informs Dr. King that he will be in Atlanta from February 24th to February 29th.

The Christian Church and Communist Atheism

Helmut Gollwitzer, a Protestant theologian, completes this body of work entitled "The Christian Church and Communist Atheism." The author states that, "socialists may be Christians, but Christians must be socialists."

The Future of Integration

Dr. King discusses the various forms of segregation and the corresponding legislative acts that affect African Americans at the National Convention of the Fellowship of Reconciliation. King also provides details of how he hopes integration will take place.

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