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Toynbee, Arnold Joseph

Associated Archive Content : 10 results

Address by Dabbs entitled 'Quit You Like Men' Delivered at SCLC

This address to the Fall Session of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference was delivered in October, 1959, by James McBride Dabbs. Dabbs speaks to the social condition in the United States, highlighting the equality of the races. Arguing that justice is a two way street, Dabbs brings up Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom," in which Dr. King defends the Montgomery bus boycott as an essential non-cooperation to show discontent.

Christianity and Civilization

Dr. King records a quote from Arnold J. Toynbee's "Civilization on Trial" and the view that "religious progress comes through the birth and death of civilization."

Letter from the Associated Negro Press to MLK

Donald Kittell, an administrative assistant for the Associated Negro Press, writes to Dr. King regarding his four "My Dream" columns. Enclosed in the letter is a copy of each column. Dr. King writes on a variety of topics such as social justice, equality, nonviolence and the progress of the Civil Rights Movement.

Outline of Our God is Able

Dr. King outlines his sermon, "Our God is Able." He plans to explain the good and evil in humanity and ensures his audience that through all, "Our God is Able."

Request for MLK To Submit an Article for TV Guide

TV Guide seeks Dr. King's critique of television's positive contributions to life in the U.S., race relations, and negro life.

Toynbee

Dr. King highlights a quote from Arnold J. Toynbee's twelve-volume analysis of the rise and fall of civilizations, "A Study of History."

Toynbee

Dr. King quotes British historian Arnold J. Toynbee from his work "A Study of History."

Toynbee: List of Twenty-One Societies

Dr. King notes the twenty-one civilizations described in Arnold Toynbee's "A Study of History."

TV Guide Requests Article on TV's Contributions to Civil Rights

TV Guide, in a letter signed by editor Merrill Panitt dated April 11, 1967, invites Dr. King to write an article of 1500 to 2000 words on the positive role television has played in fostering better relations between the races. The previous year, the magazine published a series on television?s impact on society that was largely negative. A proposed series for the 1967-1968 television season would recognize some of the good things television has accomplished. Dr. King is offered $1000 for the article.

Vietnam and the Conscience of U.S.A.

The author argues that the U.S. is fighting a false bogey of international communism in Vietnam at the expense of Great Society programs at home.