Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Wallace, George C. (George Corley)

b. 1917 - d. 2005

George Wallace, four-term Alabama governor, ran four times for U.S. president. As a moderate on race, he was defeated by a Ku Klux Klan-backed candidate. He won four years later promising “segregation now, segregation tomorrow, and segregation forever.” In June 1963 he defied the U.S. Justice Department, blocking black students from registering at the University of Alabama. In September, he ordered state police to prevent desegregated schools from opening in four cities. In both cases, President Kennedy federalized the Alabama National Guard to enforce the law. Wallace directed state troopers to stop civil rights marchers in Selma in 1965, resulting in Bloody Sunday. As a third party presidential candidate in 1968, Wallace won five Southern states. In the 1972 campaign, he was shot and paralyzed from the waist down. In 1979, Wallace visited the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery that Dr. King had served and said that, since the shooting, he understood the pain blacks endure. Wallace asked forgiveness for the pain he had caused. He won his last term as governor in 1982 with substantial support from black voters.

Associated Archive Content : 38 results

Dr. Abernathy Appeals to New Governor of Alabama

Ralph David Abernathy, vice-president of the SCLC, issues a press release concerning the federal governments decision to halt funding to the state of Alabama for noncompliance with the 'law of the land'. Abernathy appeals this decision and asserts that the blame should be directed towards local government officials such as George C. Wallace.

I HAVE A DREAM

Text of Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech delivered August 28, 1963 at the Lincoln Memorial, Washington, D. C.

I Will Vote For You

Mr. Joe Kozne proclaims allegiance to Dr. King and his political aspirations if George Wallace, the governor of Alabama, runs for presidency.

Killing Won't Frighten Negroes

Regarding the violence in Alabama, Dr. King decries the lack of justice for the ten murdered civil rights demonstrators under Governor Wallace's administration. He continues by saying that "eyes should have been on God" the Sunday morning the four girls were killed in Birmingham. King declares that the killings will not frighten the activists into submission.

Letter From A.H. Emmott to MLK

A. H. Emmott congratulates Dr. King on winning Time Magazine's "Man of the Year" award and invites him to speak at the Annual Convention of the Union of British Columbia Municipalities in Canada. The UMBC is an organization, which represents the interests of local governments within the Province of British Columbia.

Letter from Al Capp to MLK

Al Capp refuses to donate to the SCLC because he feels that organizations like Dr. King's promote violence against White Americans.

Letter from Anonymous Writer to MLK

The author of this letter copies an article "Communists Meet the Church," published by the San Francisco Examiner and Chronicle, to support his accusations of cooperation between the Catholic Church and Communists.

Letter from Charley Brown to MLK about Wallace Administration

In this letter Charley Brown suggests to Dr. King the idea of endorsing Mrs. Wallace for governor of Alabama, arguing that this would actually lose Mr. Wallace a number of votes.

Letter from Clare Stover to the SCLC

Mrs. Stover sends the SCLC a copy of a letter she sent to the Hammermill Paper Company following its decision to locate in Alabama. She condemns the company's decision because she feels economic development should be withheld from states that do not uphold federal law. She also questions whether the State of Alabama will be able to honor its promise of tax breaks, which it used to lure Hammermill Paper Company to the state.

Letter from Elmer A. Rovang to MLK

Elmer Rovang expresses disdain for Dr. King's views on foreign policy and space exploration. Rovang even threatens to vote for George Wallace as President in order to counter Dr. King's "destructive" ideology.

Letter from Howard Schomer to Robert Kennedy

Howard Schomer asks the US Attorney General several questions about the legality of a police raid that occurred at a Southern Conference Educational Fund (SCEF) office in New Orleans, Louisiana. Schomer wants to know if the statute under which the raid was carried out has legal force and does the Department of Justice have an obligation to make its evidence public?

Letter from Jack Michlin to George C. Wallace

Jack Michlin criticizes former Alabama Governor George Wallace for making misleading statements about the American and Confederate slave trade on "The Mike Douglas Show."

Letter from John A. Clark to MLK Regarding Scriptures, Spiritual Advice and Prayer

In this letter, Reverend John A. Clark provides spiritual advice, scripture and prayer for Dr. King during hard times as well as for preparation of the future. Reverend John A. Clark also mentions starting a revival and revisiting Washington to D.C. to preach for a cause.

Letter from Mildred Lynch to MLK

Secretary of the Canadian Anti-Apartheid Committee Mrs. Mildred Lynch inquires about Dr. King's availability to join group members for an upcoming 1968 public meeting to be held in Toronto.

Letter from New York Third Grader Debbie Bass to MLK

Third grade student Debbie Bass chose Dr. King for her writing assignment. Bass feels that Dr. King was the right individual chosen to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. She also conveys her frustration towards Alabama Governor George Wallace for not allowing Negroes to vote.

Letter from Richard P. Heath to MLK

Richard P. Heath expresses his distaste for Dr. King's method of attaining equal rights and freedoms. He posits, "In order to have rights and freedoms, we must be responsible for our actions."

Letter from S. Keith Graham to MLK

Skyline High School invites Dr. King to attend their annual dance sponsored by the Associated Men of Skyline. The dance is entitled, "The Southern Queen," and may include additional prominent leaders such as President Lyndon B. Johnson.

Letter from Ted Mercer Jr. to MLK

Mr. Mercer requests materials to promote Dr. King's candidacy in the "Choice '68" mock election program on the Bryan College campus. He also relays an invitation from the student body vice president asking Dr. King to speak on campus.

Letter from Tommie Crockett to MLK

Tommie Crockett expresses his appreciation for the work of Dr. King. He explains that black people are getting tired of the nonviolence method and are beginning to embrace the term, "Black Power." He explains that blacks will no longer participate in peaceful civil rights demonstrations because, "we already done that."

Letter from Victor Sharrow to MLK

Victor Sharrow requests a meeting with Dr. King to discuss implementing state and federal plans purportedly suggested by President Johnson. Mr. Sparrow believes that decreasing the number of racist southern representatives will have a collateral affect on southern apportionment of presidential electors.

Letter to MLK from A Friend of Justice and Democracy

An anonymous individual writes Dr. King to declare that the Jewish people are responsible for the oppression of Negroes.

MLK Address at the Georgia State Capitol Regarding Julian Bond

Dr. King delivers this speech at the State Capitol of Georgia protesting the legislation refusal to seat black politician Julian Bond. King calls this a "grave injustice" particularly since the state legislature of Georgia considers itself protecting the United States Constitution. Dr. King points out the irony of this act and exposes other irresponsible actions of the legislature.

MLK Speaks on Church Bombing in Birmingham, AL

Dr. King speaks on the bombing at Sixteenth Street Baptist Church that killed four girls in Birmingham, Alabama.

Negroes See No Future for King as National Leader, Except in Politics

Almena Lomax discusses the public opinions of African Americans on Dr. King being elected to a national office.

New York Amsterdam News: Our New President

Dr. King opens his statement on Lyndon B. Johnson, the new president of the United States, and how the tenure of his presidency began with adversity. Due to the elected southern president, the nation questions the possible improvement of the Negro community. Dr. King asserts that President Johnson's record on civil rights is astounding and his "southern-ness" will provide him with a better understanding of the Negro's plight. Dr. King further details the perceptions, actions, and works of President Johnson's efforts in the civil rights movement.

One Vote for Every Man: Civil Rights Act

In this draft of an article for the March 1965 IUD Agenda, an AFL-CIO monthly publication, Dr. King recounts the progress made by the Civil Rights Movement and states that the issue in 1965 is the right to vote and the venue is Selma, Alabama. He discusses the pattern of exclusion, including the abuse of power by local sheriffs, illegal use of local and state laws, delay tactics of registrars, and literacy tests. He outlines measures that a Civil Rights Act of 1965 should include.

Pamphlet About the Black Panther Party

This pamphlet contains historical and contextual references to the Black Panther Party. It also includes a speech by John Hulett and an interview of Stokely Carmichael highlighting the political and social movements occurring in Lowndes County, Alabama.

Pledge Card: Get Rid of Wallace

This adverse advertisement published by the SCLC encourages Negro residents of Alabama not to vote for Governor George Wallace.

Saturday Review: Behind the Selma March

Dr. King describes the events surrounding the Selma-Montgomery Civil Rights March of 1965.

Southern Conference Educational Fund Endorsement of MLK Vietnam Stance

The Southern Conference Educational Fund issues this article in the Patriot News Service. This statement supports Dr. King's sentiments regarding the Vietnam War and also details issues of race, injustice, and inequality in various places throughout the world.

Pages