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Montgomery Improvement Association

Dr. King writes in Stride Toward Freedom that after the arrest and trial of Rosa Parks, Rev. Ralph David Abernathy of First Baptist Church, E. D. (Edgar Daniel) Nixon of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), and Rev. Edgar N. French of Hilliard Chapel AME Zion Church “discussed the need for some organization to guide and direct the protest.” Rev. L. Roy Bennett of Mt. Zion AME Zion Church called a meeting of several community leaders that afternoon. On December 5, 1955, the Montgomery Improvement Association (MIA) was born, with Dr. King elected as its first president. After the Montgomery Bus Boycott victory, the MIA went on to be a founding organization of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC).

Associated Archive Content : 63 results

Address by MLK at 47th NAACP Annual Convention

Dr. King addresses the audience at the 47th NAACP annual convention in San Francisco, California. King begins with background information of slavery and its physical and mental effects on Africans, then tells the "Montgomery Story." This story begins with a mental transformation among blacks, which led to the Montgomery boycott. As a result of the boycott, blacks were empowered and began fighting injustice and seeking changes in unfair legislation.

Address by MLK at SCLC Ministers Conference

Dr. King addresses those in attendance at the Southern Christian Ministers Conference. He brings words of encouragement to those working diligently for social change in Mississippi. He speaks words of promise that things will change since the Supreme Court has ruled segregation unconstitutional and he gives examples of how things are slowly changing. However, he acknowledges that there is still much work to be done, especially in the South. Dr. King lists actions that must be at the top of everyone's list to be taken care of.

Address by MLK at the Washington, DC Prayer Pilgrimage for Freedom

Dr. King gives an address at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D. C. regarding race relations and the struggle for justice and racial equality in America. King discusses the responsibility of the President, Congress, and federal courts to ensure all blacks the have the opportunity and the right to vote. King closes by asserting that everyone must stand firm in faith and act only in love and nonviolence in the fight for these rights.

Address to the National Bar Association

Dr. King shares with the National Bar Association of Milwaukee, the history of segregation and why African Americans fight for equality.

An Interview With MLK

A young student from Towns Elementary School in Atlanta interviews Dr. King for a class assignment. The student asks important questions relating to Dr. King's family background, career in ministry and his influence in the civil rights movement. When asked about being the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King responds by saying, "It is more of a tribute to the thousands of gallant people who have participated in the struggle for equality, and who have done it in a peaceful, courageous manner."

Annual Address by MLK for the Montgomery Improvement Association

This document outlines Dr. King's address for the Fourth Anniversary of the Montgomery Improvement Association, held at Bethel Baptist Church in Montgomery. In the address, Dr. King speaks about the history, achievements and current task of the Association.

Annual Address Delivered at the First Annual Institute on Nonviolence and Social Change

Dr. King's speech at the First Annual Institute of Non-Violence and Social Change addresses many issues regarding the African American. The most recurring issues are of obtaining and maintaining freedom, equality and personal dignity.

Biographical Sketch of Dr. Ralph David Avernathy

This biographical sketch of Dr. Abernathy outlines his positions, recognitions, education, travel experience and personal life. Dr. Abernathy served as President of the SCLC after Dr. King's death and also served as a member of the NAACP, and Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc.

Dexter Echo: February 3, 1960

This issue of the Dexter Echo honors Dr. and Mrs. King's final day at the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church.

Dr. King Leaves Montgomery for Atlanta

This news release announces Dr. King's decision to resign as Pastor of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama and move to Atlanta, Georgia. Relocating to Atlanta will enable Dr. King to Co-Pastor Ebenezer Baptist Church with his father, and will leave him in close proximity to the SCLC.

Fisk News: The Montgomery Story

This publication of Fisk News features one of Dr. King's speeches on page five. The speech is entitled "The Montgomery Story," and was delivered at the 13th Annual Institute of Race Relations at Fisk University. Dr. King commences to share of Rosa Parks' refusal to move from her bus seat and help begin the historic Montgomery Bus Boycott. Blacks boycotted public transportation for 7 months in Montgomery, Alabama and achieved success in changing the city's discriminatory practices.

Friends Journal: A Quaker Weekly

Dr. King's article, "Nonviolence and Racial Justice" is included in this edition of the Friends Journal. Dr. King's entry discusses the various implications of race relations in America and the beneficial elements of nonviolence.

Institute of Non-Violence and Social Change: Reformation for Freedom

This 1957 program with the theme "Dignity with Humility, Love with Courage and Justice without Violence" details an event of the Institute of Non-Violence and Social Change, in which Dr. King is featured as a guest speaker. Though his affiliation is listed as President of Montgomery's Improvement Association, Dr. King appeared as leader of the nascent Southern Christian Leadership Conference, formed January 10, 1957.

Letter from Anna Hedgeman to MLK

Dr. Hedgeman writes Dr. King to express her support for Dr. King's quality service that he has given America. He then targets Dr. King on a letter he received on the representation of the slogan "Black Power." Dr. Hedgeman feels the slogan relates strongly towards extremists and black supremacy. Lastly, she encloses a small contribution and two letters.

Letter from Chester Bowles to MLK

Chester Bowels writes Dr. King requesting the use of his quotes to submit to the Saturday Evening Post. Mr. Bowels also regrets to inform Dr. King that he cannot join the national committee to raise funds to fight for Negros voting rights in the Southern states.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Charles P. Forbes

On behalf of Dr. King, Dora McDonald thanks Charles P. Forbes for sending the report on the MIA Institute.

Letter from Edgar E. Evans to MLK

Edgar E. Evans communicates with Dr. King to discuss stocks regarding the Farm and City Enterprises, Inc. Mr. Evans further informs Dr. King of the Negro Citizen's lack of confidence within the corporation. He continues to expound on the financial inconsistencies within the organization.

Letter from Harris Wofford to MLK and Ralph Abernathy

Harris Wofford, civil rights supporter and friend of Dr. King, proposes "the right next step" for King and the Montgomery Improvement Association. He suggests round-table conferences composed of white and Negro ministers, an idea inspired by the efforts of Gandhi.

Letter from Hazel Gregory to MLK

Hazel Gregory, on behalf of the Montgomery Improvement Association, asks Dr. King about transportation to the March on Washington. She also commends him on his recent article published in "Ebony." Dr. King was president of the Montgomery Improvement Association from 1955 to 1960. The organization was founded after the arrest of Rosa Parks, which sparked the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

Letter from John O. Killens to MLK About a Book Party

In this letter, Killens discusses the possibility of a book party in Dr. King's honor. Killens, Ruby Dee, Lofton Mitchell, Ossie Davis, and Harry Belafonte are exploring this idea and believe that at this event many books would be sold and the message of civil rights could be communicated to thousands.

Letter from L. D. Reddick to Colleagues

L. D. Reddick's colleagues received this letter pertaining to the business of Dr. King's papers and where they should be housed.

Letter from Maude to MLK

Maude extends her wishes for the rapid recovery of Dr. King, following a stabbing in New York. She assures him that she is holding down the fort and provides him with a breakdown of correspondences that he has received.

Letter from Mel Koch to MLK

Mel Koch responds to Dr. King's request about purchasing Volkswagen Microbuses for the Montgomery Improvement Association. Koch includes reasons as to why he opposes the idea and cannot recommend the vehicles for King's purposes.

Letter from MLK to a Donor

Dr. King expresses gratitude for a contribution received by The Montgomery Improvement Association.

Letter from MLK to Marion Jordan

Dr. King apologizes to Mrs. Marion Jordon and the Pittsburgh branch of the NAACP for the lack of acknowledgment for their contribution to the Montgomery Improvement Association. He expresses appreciation for their support and provides a report of their total contributions.

Letter from MLK to Rev. L. C. Henegan

Dr. King thanks Rev. L. C. Henegan for his generous contribution to the Montgomery Improvement Association.

Letter from Viva Sloan to MLK

Viva O'Dean Sloan commends Dr. King on his efforts, but calls on his support to promote denominational integration of religions.

Letter from W. Russell Chapman to MLK

The York County, Pennsylvania branch of the NAACP sends a second invitation to Dr. King to be a guest speaker.

Letter to MLK Regarding Support and Donation

A New York couple and their 9 year old son, mailed Dr. King this get well letter praying for his recovery and saluting him for his work.

Letter to Ruth D. Beyer from Dorothy Gaines

Dorothy Gaines provides Ruth D. Beyer with the address of the Montgomery Improvement Association due to the possibility of a check lost in the mail.

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