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Wilmore, Gayraud S.

b. 1921

Rev. Gayraud S. Wilmore, a theologian and scholar of African American history and the black church, organized and trained ministers to participate in civil rights boycotts and protests around the country. After serving in the all-black 92nd Infantry division in Italy during World War II, he finished his undergraduate and divinity education at Lincoln University and was ordained a Presbyterian minister. In 1953 Wilmore began work with the United Presbyterian Church USA (UPCUSA) Department of Social Education and Action. In 1963, he was appointed first executive director of the UPCUSA’s Commission on Religion and Race, overseeing racial justice initiatives. He participated in the 1966 Mississippi March Against Fear and attended Dr. King’s funeral as an official representative of the UPCSA. Wilmore is recognized internationally for his study of African American religion and spirituality and is the author or editor of 16 books.

Associated Archive Content : 4 results

Letter from Edward Williams to MLK

The United Presbyterian Church's Commission on Religion and Race awarded a grant to SCLC for the salary of Hosea Williams. The letter accompanies a check for partial payment.

Mail and Messages Note to MLK

This is a list of mail and messages for Dr. King dated 12/12/67. It includes a letter from his literary agent Joan Daves about a speech to be given at the University of Kansas, a publication from the Southern Regional Council, and phone calls about speaking engagements and media inquiries.

Official Religious Representatives Attending MLK Funeral

This document contains a list of official religious representatives who will attend Dr. King's funeral.

Religion and Race Memo

The Religion and Race organization distributes a memo to discuss the various topics involving the meaning of "black power", the United Presbyterians joint actions within the Mississippi March, the testimony's end in Wilcox County, and Project Equality.