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NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund

Associated Archive Content : 31 results

A Promising Day for the City of Selma

In this handwritten public statement, the author addresses the Negro citizens of Selma, Alabama by commending their efforts of non-violence during a one-thousand person demonstration for equal voting rights.

A Realistic Look at Race Relations

Dr. King gives the three views one can take regarding the state of race relations: optimism, pessimism, and realistic. Dr. King argues for a realistic stance because America has accomplished much in race relations, but still has a long way to go. He further explains that he thinks segregation is in its last days.

Convocation on Equal Justice Under the Law

This is a transcript of remarks made by Dr. King at the Convocation on Equal Justice Under Law, sponsored by the NAACP Legal Defense Fund on May 28, 1964.

Letter from Amelia P. Boynton to the SCLC

Amelia Boynton writes the members of the SCLC seeking financial assistance to help purchase a particular piece of land to help start a new sewing machine factory and other projects in Selma, Alabama. Boynton provides details of the history of the struggle of people of color in Selma, and stresses that the land would be used to help teach the underprivileged in the area to help themselves.

Letter from Grenville Clark to Dr. King Regarding the N.A.A.C.P Legal Defense Fund

In this letter, Grenville Clark provides details about his involvement with the N.A.A.C.P Legal Defense Fund, which he believes the kind of work it is doing must be constantly supplemented by the mass non-violence direct action.

Letter from Jack Greenberg to Chauncey Eskridge

Jack Greenberg responds to a letter from Chauncey Eskridge regarding bonds posted for the Birmingham demonstration cases. Greenberg reacts to court decisions related to the cases and provides the next steps for the Shuttlesworth v. City of Birmingham case.

Letter from Jack Greenberg to MLK

Jack Greenberg congratulates Dr. King for being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Jack Greenberg to MLK

Jack Greenberg informs Dr. King that he has filed a case in Mississippi "requesting the court to require law enforcement officials to protect civil rights workers and other citizens."

Letter from Jack Greenberg to MLK and Andrew Young

As a result of an automobile accident, Jack Greenberg informs Dr. King and Andrew Young of possible litigation against SCLC.

Letter from Jameas Lucas to MLK Regarding Legal Help

Mr. Lucas requests Dr. King's legal assistance regarding a manslaughter trial against a white man.

Letter from MLK to Alvin Jackson

Dr. King advises Alvin Jackson to contact the NAACP Legal Defense Fund to obtain assistance.

Letter from MLK to Anna Frank

Dr. King informs Mrs. Frank, assistant to Dr. Chalmers, of his travel arrangements to New York where he is set to speak at the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund dinner.

Letter from MLK to Jimmie Wattson

Dr. King acknowledges his receipt of Jimmie Wattson's letter and expresses his deep concern for Mr. Wattson's imprisonment. Dr. King explains to Mr. Wattson that the SCLC does not have legal staff to handle matters. Dr. King suggests that he write the NAACP Legal Defense Fund.

Letter from MLK to Mr. and Mrs. Robert Gates

Dr. King thanks Mr. and Mrs. Robert Gates for their donation to the SCLC. He also tells them that the SCLC supports the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund's "Committee of 100."

Letter from MLK to Mr. Neiman

In this document, Dr. King writes a draft letter to Mr. Neiman thanking him for offering his legal services to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He advises Mr. Neiman to forward his employment information to the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Theall

Dr. King states that he is regretful to hear of Rev. Theall's circumstance and recommends that he contact Attorney Jack Greenberg, Chief Council of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund.

Letter from MLK to Robert McDougal, Jr.

Dr. King thanks Robert McDougal, Jr. for his contribution and support to SCLC and the NAACP Legal Defense Fund.

Letter from MLK to Willie Faust

Dr. King responds to a letter from Willie Gate Faust regarding an inquiry pertaining to legal advice and his release from jail. Reverend King refers the inmate to Attorney Donald Lee Hollowell, counsel for the NAACP.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Gates to MLK

Bob and Betty Gates write Dr. King enclosing a contribution toward his work for freedom and better opportunities for African Americans. The Gates also ask Dr. King's opinion regarding the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund.

Letter from Willie Gate Forest to MLK

Willie Gate Forest writes Dr. King requesting his assistance after being wrongly accused of a crime he claims to have not committed. He stresses that he remains in jail despite another person confessing to the crime.

Letter from Wyatt Tee Walker to Constance Baker Motley

Mr. Walker informs Mrs. Motley, Associate Council of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, that either he or Dr. King will be in attendance at the upcoming Lawyers Conference.

MLK Appearance List

This itinerary highlights Dr. King's appearances over a six month period.

MLK's Remarks at the World March Toward Human Rights Luncheon

This is a draft of remarks made by Dr. King to the World March Toward Human Rights Luncheon of the NAACP's Legal Education Defense Fund. The event took place at the Americana Hotel in Arlington, Virginia. Dr. King states that human rights involve two elements: recognition and opportunity. Dr. King proposes that the United States launch a Bill of Rights for the Disadvantaged.

New York Post: A Poor Show

The Child Development Group in Mississippi (CDGM) was a head start project created in 1965 with the help of a federally funded grant. The program not only specialized in child development, but sought to increase community involvement. In late 1966, Mississippi Senator Stennis "opened fire" on the program, charging those involved with malpractice. Consequently, Sargent Shiver, Director of the Office of Economic Opportunity, formed a "more respectable anti-poverty unity" called Mississippi Action for Progress to takeover CDGM.

News/Letter: Atlanta Workshop in Nonviolence

Here is a 1967 newsletter from the Atlanta Workshop in Nonviolence, covering a number of topics including the Vietnam War, the March on Washington, fascism, and non-violent tactical plans.

People to People: The Law is Majestic

Dr. King pays homage to the numerous lawyers of the Civil Rights Movement and asserts that the one unifying belief among lawyers is the idea that "law is majestic and the judicial process is supreme." Dr. King supports this claim with a story about his Negro lawyers successfully winning a case in Birmingham with an all-white jury.

Recent Court Guidelines Concerning Demonstrations

This memorandum outlines recent legislation that permits "street demonstrations as an exercise of freedom of speech and of assembly." Specific court cases in the state of Alabama are also mentioned throughout the text.

SCLC Newsletter: October 1963

This document contains the SCLC's newletter for October 1963. The articles featured in the newsletter include: SCLC's recent accomplishments, details of the Sixteen Street Baptist Church bombing, the seventh annual SCLC convention, data regarding employment for Negroes in Alabama, and gains made in St. Augustine, Florida. Also featured are numerous photographs of Dr. King and notable Civil Rights leaders.

SCLC Report of the Director

This document contains a six month SCLC Semi-Annual Report. The SCLC reports on their accomplishments in the areas of social action, fundraising, education, legal defense, etc. This document discusses the Virginia Christian Leadership Conference, the SCLC Leadership Training Program, and the Citizens Voter Registration Drive. Also included is a list of recommendations for the SCLC staff.

Statement from the Eisenhower Administration to the NAACP

In an address to the NAACP, Vice President Richard Nixon discusses the reasons that progress has been made in the Eisenhower Administration and the goals that the organization needs to continue working toward.

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