Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP)

The NAACP was founded in 1909 to promote racial equality. Its first efforts focused on ending lynching and protesting D. W. Griffith’s film, Birth of a Nation. In 1910, the NAACP journal The Crisis was started with W. E. B. DuBois as editor. The NAACP successfully challenged the separate-but-equal doctrine, winning the U.S. Supreme Court’s landmark Brown v. Board of Education ruling in 1954. The NAACP’s lobbying efforts were instrumental in achieving integration of the military (1948) and passage of the Civil Rights Acts (1957, 1964, and 1968) and Voting Rights Act (1965). The NAACP supported the Montgomery Bus Boycott, collaborated with the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) on civil rights campaigns, and helped organize the 1963 March on Washington. Opposed to Dr. King’s public stand on the Vietnam War, the NAACP continued to work with him on the plight of urban blacks.

Associated Archive Content : 387 results

Letter from John Huston to MLK

Reverend John Huston of the East View United Church of Christ writes to Dr. King to express his appreciation for Operation Breadbasket. Huston calls this the most effective civil rights initiative he's ever had the pleasure of working on. He brings up three points that he would like to discuss with Dr. King, including how to better advocate for the Negroes' federally guaranteed rights.

Letter from Joseph McKinney to MLK

Reverend Lee Wright invites Dr. King to speak at the Annual Spring Membership Campaign for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, Wheeling Branch in West Virginia.

Letter from Joseph T. Beaver to MLK

Joseph Beaver, Jr. sends his sympathy to Dr. King following the attempt on Dr. King's life. He had originally included a biography of Wendell Phillips Dabney.

Letter from Juanita to MLK

Juanita offers praise and gratitude to Dr. King for his assistance regarding some imprisoned associates. Juanita also offers her prayers to Dr. King.

Letter from June Gordon to MLK

June Gordon, as the Executive Director of the Emma Lazarus Federation of Jewish Women's Clubs, issues a check to SCLC. They also pledge to assist other civil rights groups involved in the struggle for equality.

Letter from Kathy Boudin to MLK

Conference Coordinator Kathy Boudin invites Dr. King to participate in a three-day conference held by the students of Bryn Mawr and Haverford Colleges.

Letter from Kivie Kaplan to Dora McDonald

Kivie Kaplan discusses with Dora McDonald the order of 200 books with autographed signatures from Dr. King. Mr. Kaplan has appointed direction of the order to Miss Roberta Halpern of the Publication Division of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations.

Letter from L. Alexander Harper and Charles E. Cobb to Edith M. Lerrigo

Edith Lerrigo writes with concern regarding the support of the "Crisis and Commitment" call by several civil rights leaders. Lerrigo endorses Dr. King's decision to refuse his signatory on the document supporting the call, stating that this act "should have been sufficient to give pause to groups like the YWCA before jumping on the moderate bandwagon."

Letter from L. E. Stahl to SCLC

Ruth Stahl encloses a financial contribution to the SCLC for their commitment to improving the issues of the world. Mrs. Stahl intended to join the NAACP but decided to contribute to progressive organizations instead.

Letter from Leon Lowry to the King's

A. Leon Lowry invites the Kings to speak at Beulah Baptist Institutional Church in Florida for their Men's and Women's services.

Letter From Leslie W. Dunbar

Leslie Dunbar outlines information regarding a grant and various agency protocols from the Southern Regional Council for voter registration.

Letter from Lia Bosonetto to MLK Regarding Langston Hughes

Lia Bosonetto, a college student in Italy, writes Dr. King requesting information on Langston Hughes for her thesis.

Letter from Lloyd Wilson to Roy Wilkins

Lloyd Wilson affirms his support for Dr. King, but he cannot agree with Dr. King's recent statements concerning the Vietnam War. He lists a series of questions hoping to gain clarity from Dr. King or Mr. Wilkins.

Letter from Lottie Thomas to MLK

Lottie Thomas, a Negro businesswoman from Alaska, requests Dr. King's help with her business. Mrs. Thomas informs Dr. King of the unjust treatment she has endured in Alaska and of her current financial tribulations.

Letter from Lynne Ansorge to MLK

Lynne Ansorge invites Dr. King to Lawrence College. He also tells Dr. King about the issues that have been occurring in their community.

Letter from Marguerite Munson to MLK

Mrs.Munson writes Dr.King to ask for his assistance in finding a lawyer that is not corrupted by the government.

Letter from Marion Hoyt to MLK

Marian Hoyt, manager of the Winsor School's Senior Play, writes Dr. King, providing him a donation on the behalf of the school in Boston. The writer cites specifically appreciation for Dr. King's "work in Montgomery."

Letter from Martha Williams to MLK

Martha Williams, who serves as the Acting Secretary of "The Zippers," a Chicago-based social and charity club, forwards a donation to the SCLC. She discusses the recent march from Selma to Montgomery when Alabama guardsmen respectfully removed their helmets during a prayer at the culminating rally. Williams extends a special prayer of protection for Dr. King and civil rights workers.

Letter from Mary Grooms to Coretta Scott King

Mrs. Mary H. Grooms writes Mrs. Coretta Scott King expressing her support for Dr. King and the upcoming March on Washington. She also requests that Dr. King reach out to leaders in the North who have sought to emulate his methods.

Letter from Massachusetts Mental Health Center to MLK

Drs. Myron Sharaf and Milton Greenblatt invite Dr. King to speak at the Commonwealth of Massachusetts' Department of Mental Health where the staff and researchers share an interest in ending "hate in social life."

Letter from Matthew Schechter to MLK Regarding NAACP

Mr. Schechter encloses correspondences between hm and the NAACP regarding Dr. King's comments on the Vietnam War and the civil rights movements. Mr. Schechter is returning his membership card due to the NAACP's "uncalled for commentary" concerning Dr. King. Mr. Morsell, Assistant Executive Director of the NAACP, informs Mr. Schechter that the NAACP took a position on the issue because of numerous requests they received from local members and leaders.

Letter from Mel Koch to MLK

Mel Koch responds to Dr. King's request about purchasing Volkswagen Microbuses for the Montgomery Improvement Association. Koch includes reasons as to why he opposes the idea and cannot recommend the vehicles for King's purposes.

Letter from Michael Bennett to MLK

In this letter, Mr.Michael Bennett expresses how delighted the NAACP is knowing Dr. King will lecture on Kent State University's campus.

Letter from Midsouth Management's Ardin Hartman to MLK

Ardin Hardin writes to Dr. King thanking him for the invitation to the SCLC's convention, but informs him that he will not attend because he does not agree with Dr. King's views on the Vietnam War.

Letter from MLK to George T. Raymond of the Chester, Pennsylvania NAACP

Dr. King declines the Chester Branch of the NAACP's invitation to attend its celebration of the 100th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation.

Letter from MLK to John Lee Tilley

Dr. King commends Reverend Tilley on writing the preamble of an unnamed document and offers a few minor suggestions for his consideration.

Letter from MLK to Johnnie McKinney

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak in Cheyenne, Wyoming "under the auspices of the NAACP."

Letter from MLK to Marion Jordan

Dr. King apologizes to Mrs. Marion Jordon and the Pittsburgh branch of the NAACP for the lack of acknowledgment for their contribution to the Montgomery Improvement Association. He expresses appreciation for their support and provides a report of their total contributions.

Letter from MLK to Rebecca Taylor

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak in Rutledge, Pennsylvania in support of the NAACP due to his responsibilities with the SCLC and his pastorate.

Letter from MLK to Rev. C. V. Willis

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak in Coatesville, Pennsylvania in support of the NAACP. He explains that his recent commitment to the SCLC Board to tour the South for a voter registration campaign prevents him from accepting any additional speaking engagements.

Pages