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National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America

Founded in 1950, the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA (NCC) is the principal ecumenical organization of the Protestant faith. Initially focused on inclusivity in churches and denominations and then on school desegregation, the NCC became more actively involved in racial justice when Dr. King led the Montgomery Bus Boycott. It promoted the Southern Christian Leadership Conference’s 1957 Prayer Pilgrimage for Freedom. In 1963 it co-sponsored the National Conference on Religion and Race and helped organize and staff the March on Washington, where Dr. Eugene Carson Blake of the group’s Commission on Religion and Race spoke. The NCC undertook a massive lobbying effort for the Civil Rights Act of 1964, provided resources and volunteers for Mississippi Freedom Summer and started a Delta Ministry. The organization coordinated religious involvement in the Poor People’s Campaign.

Associated Archive Content : 49 results

Article Regarding New Head Start Project

Head Start is Shifted to College and Politics Behind OEO's Cutoffs.The two articles depicted provide details on the relationship between the Office of Economic Opportunity and the funds being cut off from the Child Development Group to be given to a small Mississippi college.

Biographical Sketch of Andrew Young

This document outlines the education, pastoral, and vocational experience of Andrew J. Young, Executive Director of the SCLC.

Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty Southern Rural Action Project Progress Report

This document contains the Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty Southern Rural Action Project Progress Report. Randolph T. Blackwell, former program director of the SCLC is now director of the Southern Rural Action Project.

Civil Rights Symposium Program

This document is a program from a symposium workshop on national and local civil rights challenges.

Final Plans for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

This final organizing manual for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom details all logistics of the march, including the purpose of the march and accommodations for arriving in Washington, D.C.

For Healing of The Nations

The National Council of Churches of Christ in the USA publishes this brochure on peace and race relations, calling Christians into action with the responsibility of making brotherhood a reality. Guidelines are presented for individual Christians and Churches to follow in order to create a world full of love and free of racial turmoil.

How Much Head Start for Mississippi's Children?

Kay Longcope describes the current status of the Child Development Group of Mississippi following the decision to pull funding for the program made by the Office of Economic Opportunity.

International Issues: January 26, 1968

This edition of the National Council of Churches "International Issues" features a report on the indictment of Dr. King's close associates and fellow peace activists Rev. William Sloane Coffin, Jr. and Dr. Benjamin Spock along with three other peace leaders. The indictment accuses the men of "conspiracy to counsel, aid and abet" draft evasion. The accused were charged on January 5, 1968, a few months after signing an open letter entitled "A Call to Resist Illegitimate Authority," which was published in several newspapers.

Keynote Address Introduction for Sidney Poitier

At the Tenth Annual Convention of the SCLC, Dr. King delivers this introduction of guest speaker, Sidney Poitier. Andrew Young further praises Mr. Poitier for informing the black community that one should be "proud to be black" because "black is beautiful."

Letter and Article from D. Parke Gibson to MLK

D. Parke Gibson sends this article in Race Relations and Industry to Dr. King with the intention of including him in a future issue of the magazine. Those involved in the article agree that progress towards having minorities in leadership roles is on the rise, but not fast enough.

Letter from A. Dale Fiers to MLK

A. Dale Fiers, Executive Secretary for the International Convention of Christian Churches, informs Dr. King of the order of events to take place at the Dallas Assembly of the International Convention on September 25, 1966.

Letter from Ann Raynolds to MLK

Ann Raynolds writes Dr. King informing him of her support for the upcoming Poor People's March to Washington. She also encloses a contribution.

Letter from Anna Hedgeman to MLK

Dr. Hedgeman writes Dr. King to express her support for Dr. King's quality service that he has given America. He then targets Dr. King on a letter he received on the representation of the slogan "Black Power." Dr. Hedgeman feels the slogan relates strongly towards extremists and black supremacy. Lastly, she encloses a small contribution and two letters.

Letter from Archie Crouch to MLK

Archie R. Crouch, of the Office for Communications, sends a personal letter to Dr. King using the United Presbyterian Church letterhead. He expresses his support for Dr. King's leadership against the Vietnam War and states that he meets many people that stand in opposition to the war. Crouch encloses recent issues of the publications New and Motive, which highlight the anti-war efforts taking place in the Presbyterian Church.

Letter from Charles S. Spivey, Jr. to the Racial Justice Committee

Charles S. Spivey, Jr. outlines the events to take place during the SCLC Poor Peoples Campaign under the leadership of Dr. King. The main events all transpired after Dr. King's assassination on April 4th, 1968.

Letter from David Cassat to MLK

Mr. Cassat, Treasurer for the National Council of Churches, informs Dr. King about the benefits of the organization's Gift Annuity Program. He also encloses a brochure that outlines the various details of this innovative initiative.

Letter from Franklin I. Gamwell with Enclosed Copy of the Interracial News Service Newsletter

Franklin I. Gamwell, of the Student Interracial Ministry, requests if Dr. King would like to have an intern student at Ebenezer Baptist Church for 1963.
Interracial News Service describes the experiences of many Student Interracial Ministry participants and the pastors of the churches they spent the summers with.

Letter from R. H. Edwin Espy to MLK

Mr. Espy acknowledges the contribution of Dr. King's congregation, Ebenezer Baptist Church, to the National Council of the Churches of Christ and seeks a renewal of that commitment to its work.

Letter from Rachel Davis DuBois to MLK

Ms. Dubois writes to Dr. King regarding the strategy of the Commission on Religion and Race of the National Council of Churches. She believes that a change in attitude of whites, so that they desire to work with "Americans of darker complexion" should be a part of this strategy.

Letter from Ralph M. Holdeman to MLK Pertaining to a Speaking Invitation

In this letter, Mr. Holdeman of the National Council of Churches of Christ, requests that Dr. King speak at the Ecumenical Evangelism Conference in Wisconsin.

Letter from Rev. Celestine Fernado to MLK

The Editor of the Ceylon Churchman, Reverend Celestine Fernando, request a copy of Dr. King's letter from jail to publish in the magazine. Reverend Fernando is certain that this publication is a great message and will allow the church to re-evaluate its work.

Letter from Rev. J. Edward Lantz to MLK

Rev. Lantz, Executive Director of the Southern Office of the National Council of the Churches of Christ, congratulates Dr. King for being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Steve Allen to MLK

Mr. Allen forwards Dr. King a letter from Paul C. Hosfeldt in which Mr. Hosfeldt calls Dr. King a Communist. Mr. Allen believes that this letter will be of interest to Dr. King and his attorneys.

Letter from Theodore E. Brown to MLK and Others

Mr. Theodore Brown informs Dr. King and other members of the ANLCA's call committee of vaccinations required when traveling internationally.

Letter from William Du Val to MLK

As a Regional Secretary for the United Presbyterian Church, Dr. King about his planned trip to Moscow. Du Val informs Dr. King that the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the U.S.A. sponsors a chaplaincy in Moscow and would like Dr. King to stop by for a visit.

March on Washington Address by Eugene Carson Blake

Rev Dr. Eugene Carson Blake, Vice Chairman of the Commission on Religion and Race of the National Council of Churches, addresses the March on Washington. He states that if all the clergy and church members he represents and all of the Roman Catholics and Jews in America were marching for jobs and freedom for Negroes, the battle for civil rights would be won. Despite the pronouncements of the religious community, the churches and society are still segregated. “Late, late we come,” he says, and in a repentant and reconciling spirit.

March on Washington Lincoln Memorial Program

This document outlines the program held at the Lincoln Memorial during the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

Men of Past and Present Pamphlet

This pamphlet features quotes 'Men of Past and Present,' including religious and political leaders, on democracy and cooperatives.

National Council of Churches

J. Oscar Lee informs the committee members of the National Council of Churches of Christ of the forthcoming General Committee meeting.

National Council of Churches Conference of Negro Leaders Opening Remarks

A. Philip Randolph makes remarks at the Conference of Negro Leaders National Council of Churches about the future of the Civil Rights Movement. Randolph expresses the importance of continuing the fight of social justice through civil rights, economics, housing and poverty.

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