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Advice for Living

From September 1957 to December 1958 Dr. King wrote “Advice for Living,” a monthly column for Ebony magazine. At the time, Ebony was led by fellow Morehouse alumnus, Lerone Bennett, who invited Dr. King to do the column. Dr. King answered questions for readers all over the country. He responded to a wide array of religious and ethical concerns, weighing in on theodicy, interracial dating, birth control, sexuality, atomic weapons and more. When Ebony’s sister magazine Jet sought to publicize the column, it did so writing “Let the man who led the Montgomery protest lead you to a happier Life.” Dr. King’s contributions came to an end when recovery from the stabbing in 1958 required that he reduce his activities.

Associated Archive Content : 59 results

"Dr. King Denounces Write-In Plot"

Contrary to what radio announcements and newspapers advertise, Dr. King urges Negro voters to vote for a presidential candidate that is already on the ballot. He expresses that he is not a candidate and does not want voters to write his name on the ballot.

A Knock At Midnight

In a tape-recorded address to the Riverside Church in New York City, Dr. King compares the civil rights struggle to a parable from St. Luke. His sermon specifically tackles contemporary social issues such as segregation, discrimination, and the philosophy of nonviolence. In addition, Dr. King explores the role of the church in dealing with such problems.

A Perspective for Christian Peace Concern

Brewster Kneen writes about the roles that Christians and the church play in the peace-making process. He cites Saint Peter and Saint Luke to support his argument.

Advice for Living

Dr. King addresses questions in the "Advice for Living" column published in Ebony Magazine on February 12, 1958.

Advice for Living

Advice for Living is a column Dr. King uses to help people with moral dilemmas. In this issue, he receives questions from an 18-year old about his mother's drinking issues, a 24-year old with relationship issues, and others.

Albany Movement Position Paper

The Albany Movement expresses the damages of segregation and outlines their requests for peaceful integration.

Anonymous letter to MLK

An anonymous individual expresses their concern with the methods and efforts Dr. King is using to achieve his goals through the Civil Rights Movement.

Bread at Midnight

"The Mennonite," issued by The Board of Education and Publication of the General Conference Mennonite Church, features an article by Dr. King entitled "Bread at Night." Dr. King begins with a parable that demonstrates not only the power of prayer, but provides metaphors for the state of America and thinking material for the role of the church during that time period.

Class Notes

Dr. King references several biblical scriptures regarding topics of ethics, knowledge, man, sin and God.

Dexter Avenue Baptist Church

This is a church program for Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in early 1956. As Pastor, Dr. King gave a sermon on "Redirecting Our Missionary Zeal."

Dr. King's Written Notes

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Ibarance Mann's views on death. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for refernce to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions and bible verses.

Draft of a Speech Regarding the Chicago Freedom Movement

This is a draft copy of Dr. King's speech on the Chicago Freedom Movement. The intention of this movement is to end slums in Chicago. Dr. King calls upon the poverty-stricken Negro, the middle class Negro, and the white community for assistance with this movement. Dr. King also states that years after the March on Washington, he has seen his dream turn into a nightmare due to the murders of civil rights activists.

Ebony: Advice For Living

Dr. King answers readers' questions regarding family dynamics, the NAACP, outer versus inner beauty and the image of Negroes in literature and the media. He advocates for open communication and pleasant attitudes in familial relationships, and he offers hope that the portrayal of Negroes in movies and "other public channels" is improving.

Esther

Dr. King discusses the religious and moral teachings in the biblical book of Esther.

Itinerary for MLK with Handwritten Notes

This itinerary from 1964 details Dr. King's traveling schedule and contains his handwritten notes with regard to discovering one's purpose in life.

Letter from an Asylum Inmate to MLK Seeking Assistance

Paul Douglas Ware, an untried inmate, requests Dr. King's "understanding, moral support, and possible assistance." Mr. Ware informs Dr. King of detailed information regarding his unjust treatment, his personal life, his present state of mind and most importantly his desire to have a stronger bond with "his own people."

Letter from Anonymous to MLK

The author of this letter expresses their concern about poverty across the United States and offers suggestions for Negros to build their own communities.

Letter from J. Herbert May to Ralph Abernathy

Herbert May discusses several points in which he disagrees with Ralph Abernathy on how to best reach a fully integrated and equitable society.

Letter from John E. Farrow to MLK

John Farrow writes Dr. King to suggest he tread softly as he continues the fight for social justice. Farrow states that whites will fight back with brute force against desegregation and civil rights for all. Farrow urges Dr. King to offer knowledge but not seek to antagonize whites during the March on Washington and his future efforts for the civil rights movement.

Letter from Lottie Thomas to MLK

Lottie Thomas, a Negro businesswoman from Alaska, requests Dr. King's help with her business. Mrs. Thomas informs Dr. King of the unjust treatment she has endured in Alaska and of her current financial tribulations.

Letter from Marian Machesney to MLK

Marian Machesney writes Dr. King to praise the book "Stride toward Freedom." Machesny also explains the issues of a family where the children are in need of food and education while describing the help he has offered them. Mr. Macheaney expresses his wish to be ordained as a minister by the Western Christian Leadership ministers and states that he is ready to quite entirely if he does not receive the help or advice he has been seeking.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Taban

Dr. King expresses his concern for Mr. Taban's welfare in Kenya after fleeing Sudan.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Queen Fields

Dr. King advises Mrs. Queen Field to contact Mr. Clarence Jones to obtain support for her children.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Thompson

This letter, addressed to a Mrs. Thompson, illuminates the issue of negros who have found themselves employed as mailmen despite being privi to some skill set obtained though either a B.A. or B.S. degree.

Letter from MLK to Thomas Harten

Dr. King writes to Rev. Harten of the Holy Trinity Baptist Church to thank him and his organization for the donation of one thousand dollars. He explains how the money will be used throughout the SCLC and the importance of having support from organizations who help contribute to the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Pastor H. Edward Whitaker to MLK

Whitaker, a former classmate at Crozer Theological Seminary, request's Dr. King's advice concerning a new ministry position at a Southern State College.

Letter from Paul Eshelman to MLK

Mr. Eshelman writes to Dr. King in support of his efforts toward helping African Americans become "first class citizens."

Letter from Paul Noe to MLK

Mr. Noe shares his ideas and comments with Dr. King regarding the Civil Rights Movement. Mr. Noe describes the Civil Rights Movement as the "exclusive domain of the black man" and discusses how he has felt very left out of the movement due to his race. He hopes that the Civil Rights Movement will become the "domain of all Americans" and will change its appeal from racism to decency.

Letter from R. Edward Dodge, Jr. to MLK

This letter dated June 19, 1965, was written to Dr. King from R. Edward Dodge, Jr. In this letter Mr. Dodge, a Caucasian man asks Dr.King if he can help him find integrated housing in Baltimore, Maryland. He will be moving there in a year to study at the John Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health. He wants to bring his family with him and he wants his children to interact and become friends with other black children. He asks for Dr. King's help without any fanfare.

Letter from Sympathizer to MLK

Writing under a pseudonym, the author suggests that the world is separate because that is the way that God intended it to be. The author pulls text from the Bible to support this idea. The author believes that society was equal with the separation and there is no need for Dr. King to continue his fight.

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