Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Afro-Americans - Religion

Associated Archive Content : 29 results

"A Knock At Midnight"

This is a draft of the sermon Dr. King wrote comparing a story from the Bible in St. Luke to the struggle to obtain equality and civil rights.

A Knock At Midnight

In a tape-recorded address to the Riverside Church in New York City, Dr. King compares the civil rights struggle to a parable from St. Luke. His sermon specifically tackles contemporary social issues such as segregation, discrimination, and the philosophy of nonviolence. In addition, Dr. King explores the role of the church in dealing with such problems.

A Letter Enclosing an Address by George B. Nesbitt

In an address at the CME Church Conference, George B. Nesbitt analyzes the role of the church during the Civil Rights Movement. During slavery, the church was a place of refuge and hope, but now individuals are beginning to lose their faith in the church.

Annual Record and Report of Life and Work

This document is a blank "Annual
Record and Report of Life and Work" for the American Baptist Convention. Had it been filled out, it would have contained information about the activities of Ebenezer Baptist Church.

Ebenezer Baptist Church Courtesy Guild Fifth Anniversary

This document is a cover page for the program of the Ebenezer Baptist Church Courtesy Guild Fifth Anniversary. Included is a listing of Guild Officers and Ministers.

Fifty-five Facts about Morehouse

This pamphlet discusses fifty-five important facts about Morehouse College and its distinguished alumni.

God (His Love)

Dr. King writes that the answer to F. W. H. Myers' question about whether the universe is friendly lies at the basis of religion. His cites E. C. Wilm's "The Problem of Religion."

Guidelines for a Constructive Church

In this sermon delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Dr. King spells out guidelines for the church: healing the broken-hearted, preaching deliverance to the captive (freeing people from everything that enslaves), and preaching the acceptable year of the Lord. The acceptable year of the Lord, he says, is every year the time is right to do right, stop lying and cheating, do justice, learn to live as brothers and beat swords into plowshares.

Information Regarding the Baha'i Faith

This excerpt on the Baha'i Faith claims that America is to be a leader in bringing world peace. The Baha'i faith has spread worldwide and promotes all religions as having a common golden rule.

Letter from a Concerned Christian to MLK

This letter penned by "Concerned Christian" informs Dr. King of a change in the course of the Civil Rights Movement. The "Concerned Christian" makes note of the increased amount of violence in the city of Baltimore and reprimands Dr. King's "reduced faith in God."

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Dr. Mays requests the help of Dr. King and several other ministers to promote theological education among Baptist parishioners.

Letter from Benjamin E. Smith to MLK

This report highlights a Birmingham conference on the "Ways and Means to Integrate the Deep South" sponsored by the Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc. This conference included several hundred white and black leaders who sought to integrate the South.

Letter from Bible Student to MLK

The bible student who wrote this letter used biblical references to justify segregation and to persuade Dr. King to cease civil rights demonstrations.

Letter from Leonard Dorsey to MLK

Leonard Dorsey requests Dr. King begin teaching the subject of Divine Retribution.

Letter from MLK to Sargent Shriver

This letter to Sargent Shriver provides details about the SCLC's 1965 Annual Convention in Birmingham, Alabama. Dr. King also extends an invitation for Mr. Shriver to open the conference with an address about poverty, unemployment, and urban migration.

Letter from Robert Johnson to MLK

The author requests Dr. King to encourage black people to put away their wickedness so the Lord can take care of them.

Letter from Samuel W. Williams to MLK

In this letter, Rev. Samuel W. Williams, Pastor of Friendship Baptist Church, offers encouraging words to Dr. King.

MLK's Interfaith Conference on Civil Rights Statement

Dr. King shares the significance of three major religious faiths of America, discussing the moral issues affiliated with segregation and the importance of the religious institutitions' influence.

People In Action: A Profound Moral..Continued

Dr. King challenges the Negro church and its leadership to uphold the morals of the community. He insists that clergymen must speak out guardedly to obtain support.

People in Action: Segregation And The Church

In this New York Amsterdam News article of February 2, 1963, Dr. King mentions writer James Baldwin’s scathing indictment of the Christian Church and states that the Church has been complicit in the system of racial segregation or remained silent on racial injustice, the nation’s most urgent social ill. The church should be the headlight, he states, not the taillight and be true to the prophetic call for justice. King takes hope, however, having just attended the National Conference on Religion and Race in Chicago, which brought together Catholic, Protestant, and Jewish leaders.

Progressives to Face Important Issues in Birmingham

This news release details a meeting of the Progressive National Baptist Convention's Southern Regional in Birmingham, Alabama. Reverend Martin King, Sr. is one of the many pastors participating.

Religion

Dr. King writes that religion is paradoxical.

Ronnie Williams 23rd Anniversary

This flyer promotes the Ronnie Williams 23rd Anniversary concert at Symphony Hall in Newark. The featured performers include the 5 Blind Boys of Alabama, Shirley Caesar and the Reverend James Cleveland.

SCLC Resolution on Afro-American Unity

In this resolution approved at its Tenth Annual Convention, SCLC affirms the need for Afro-American unity. The organization commits to conduct regional unity conferences involving all sectors of the Negro community, hold Identity Workshops on history and culture, and develop economic and political power so that Negroes can own and control their own communities. The resolution concludes by affirming the importance of black spiritual power, economic power, and political power.

Statement on Nonviolence in the South

This document is a statement addressing the need to combat the growing violence between southern Caucasian Americans and African Americans.

Statement on the Muhammed Ali World Heavyweight Title Controversy

An unknown author declares a boycott of all fight games until the Boxing Commission restores Muhammad Ali's World Heavyweight Title.

Telegram from MLK to Mrs. Lovie M. Lowe

Dr. King attempts to mediate between Mrs. Lowe and her pastor, the Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth.

We Salute You!

Thirteen members of Ebenezer Baptist Church are praised for their years of service and role in making the church monumental.

Worship (Definition)

Dr. King quotes Henry Nelson Wieman's "Methods of Private Religious Living."