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Albany Movement

The Albany Movement (November 1961-August 1962) was a regional nonviolent protest movement in southwestern Georgia formed by representatives of several local and national organizations, including the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. It aimed to end all forms of segregation and discrimination in Albany. Dr. King and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) came to Albany to aid the movement. However, nonviolent demonstrations were met with mass nonviolent arrests that did not receive a lot of negative publicity. Dr. King was arrested and jailed twice. SCLC withdrew from Albany in August 1962, before the movement had accomplished any major victories toward integration.

Associated Archive Content : 78 results

Address by Jackie Robinson at SCLC Freedom Dinner

Guest speaker Jackie Robinson discusses his personal struggles with adopting the philosophy of nonviolence, race relations and the far-reaching efforts of the SCLC.

Albany Manifesto

In support of the Albany Movement, the Albany Manifesto was drafted to make clear what the proponents of the cause sought to resolve.

Albany Manifesto

The "Albany Manifesto" declares the Albany Movement to be uncompromisingly opposed to segregation. The manifesto positions the group to continue to exercise its free speech and free assembly rights to protest segregation. Protesters insist upon the speedy resolution of the charges against seven hundred protesters that had been languishing for more than six months.

Albany Movement Position Paper

The Albany Movement expresses the damages of segregation and outlines their requests for peaceful integration.

Albany Movement Position Paper

This paper states that segregation is both unconstitutional and immoral. It calls for a face-to-face meeting with the Albany, Georgia City Commission to discuss disposition of cases against the Albany Movement and a commitment to the First Amendment right of peaceful protest; clarification of the city’s position on the recent Interstate Commerce Commission ruling and desegregation of the city’s buses, and establishment of a bi-racial commission to recommend a timetable for desegregating lunch counters, the library, schools, and parks.

Albany Movement Statement

This statement is written on behalf of people of faith who have come to support the Albany Movement. The ills experienced by the Negro community in Albany are rooted in racial separation, it says. The document requests a meeting with the City Commission to review their response to peaceful protest, clarification of the City’s position on an ICC ruling on segregated buses, and establishment of a bi-racial commission to make recommendations on desegregation.

Albany Movement Support Letter from MLK to Rev. Hugh Wire

Dr. King expresses his appreciation to Reverend Wire for his participation in the Albany Movement.

Appeal from Wyatt Tee Walker for Albany Support

Following the arrests of Dr. King and three others who held a prayer vigil at the Albany, Georgia City Hall, Rev. Wyatt Tee Walker issues this appeal for support from those active in the civil rights movement. He calls for telegrams to be sent to federal, state, and local officials, prayer vigils, and the wearing of black armbands.

Atlanta SCLC Prexy Jailed in Albany

During a prayer pilgrimage in Albany, Georgia Rev. John A. Middleton, Pastor of Atlanta's Allen Temple A. M. E. Church, and 75 other religious leaders were jailed.

Black Power

This is a chapter sermon for Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go From Here?" The civil rights leader traces the early development of Black Power and its eventual surge onto the national political scene. Though understood as a direct opposition to the nonviolent movement that organizations like SCLC, CORE, and SNCC originally supported, King describes Black Power as a "disappointment wrapped in despair."

Diary in Jail

Dr. King wrote a personal diary of his day-to-day experiences while in an Albany, Georgia jail for attempting to pray in front of City Hall. He pledged to return to jail, if necessary, if the City Commission refused to negotiate with Negro leaders on demands for immediate desegregation of all public facilities.

Dr. King recounts civil rights struggle in Albany, Georgia

Dr. King recounts the civil rights struggle in Albany, Georgia. Every element of the community participated in mass demonstrations protesting discrimination in public spaces, school segregation, denial of voting rights, and the deprivation of freedom of speech and assembly. King explains the purpose and use of nonviolent methodologies as "resistance to injustice and non-cooperation with evil." He describes several examples of direct action and the building of political strength.

I've Been To The Mountaintop

Dr. King delivers the "I've Been to the Mountaintop" speech at the Masonic Temple in Memphis, TN.

Interview Outline for WAII-TV Show-Profile Emory University Atlanta, Georgia

This document outlines Dr. Edward T. Ladd's interview with Dr. King, for broadcast on WAII-TV's program "Profile Emory University."

Jackie Robinson Heads SCLC National Drive to Rebuild Burned Churches

This press release announces Jackie Robinson's commitment to join an SCLC national fund drive to help rebuild three churches in southwest Georgia that were completely destroyed by arsonists. Robinson visited each of the sites and pledged the first one hundred dollars to the fund.

Letter from Bob Strain to MLK

Bob Strain writes Dr. King after reading an article in Newsweek entitled "Albany Movement." He apologizes for the ignorant behavior of fellow whites and expresses his desire to be a part of the movement. He also conveys his admiration for Dr. King and his work.

Letter from Burke Marshall to MLK

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General of the Department of Justice, writes Dr. King in response to a recent telegram concerning an investigation in the alleged assault upon Miss Shirley Gaines by an Albany police officer.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Florence Wright

Dora McDonald informs Florence Wright that Dr. King is currently in jail in Albany, Georgia. Dora McDonald reassures Miss Wright that her encouraging words will mean a great deal to Dr. King.

Letter from Dr. Lionel Newsom to Georgia Council on Human Relations Members

In the aftermath of the failure in attacking segregation in Albany, Georgia, the Chairman of the Georgia Council on Human Relations issues an appeal to its members to help support their continued fight. Dr. Lionel outlines the organization's past accomplishments and encourages members to learn from their mistakes in Albany to yield better results in the future.

Letter from Frances L. Lucas to MLK

Frances L. Lucas writes Dr. King concerning the actions taken to end segregation in a community in Albany, Georgia. Lucas also apologizes for not responding to Dr. Kings formal letter.

Letter from Frank Jones to MLK

Reverend Frank Jones sends Dr. King a letter expressing his concern about the recent occurrences in Albany, Georgia.

Letter from John Dempsey to S. Ernest Vandiver

Connecticut governor John Dempsey writes to Georgia governor S. Earnest Vandiver expressing his concern for the safety of Dr. King and his associates.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Ernest J. Foster

Dr. King thanks Dr. Ernest Foster for his financial contribution to the SCLC. He informs Dr. Foster of the distribution of the proceeds from a previous reception and discusses the significance of supporters to the movement. Dr. King also encloses a copy of his recent book, "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from MLK to Frank Jones

Dr. King writes Rev. Jones of Greater Piney Grove Baptist Church in Atlanta to acknowledge receipt of his contribution to the Albany Movement. Dr. King informs Rev. Jones that his check will be forwarded to Dr. William G. Anderson, founder of the Albany Movement, to assist in the work of the desegregation alliance.

Letter from MLK to George Murphy

Dr. King thanks Rev. Murphy for giving witness in Albany, Georgia. Dr. King also comments on an upcoming vote and the role of churches in race relations.

Letter from MLK to Rev. James A. Shiflett

Dr. King conveys his appreciation to Reverend Shiflett of Chicago for his involvement in and support of the Albany Movement.

Letter from MLK to Rev. John Papandrew

Dr. King thanks Rev. John Papandrew of New Hampshire for giving witness during the Albany Movement. Dr. King explains that, through the events in Albany, the world is now aware of the situation in the South.

Letter from MLK to Rev. John Porter

Dr. King expresses his gratitude to John T. Porter for his participation in and support of the movement in Albany, Georgia.

Letter from MLK to Rev. M. Sardon

Dr. King offers his gratitude to Rev. Sardon for his participation in and support of the Albany movement.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Stanley Terry

Dr. King extends his appreciation to Reverend Terry of New York for his witness in Albany, Georgia.

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