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Anti-Semitism

Associated Archive Content : 34 results

"Where Do We Go From Here?" Asks Negro King

In this article, Palmer Van Gundy reviews Dr. King's most recent book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?." He calls the book a must for all Americans, naming Dr. King not just the greatest civil rights leaders, but also a "leader for peace with freedom and justice."

Address by Jackie Robinson at SCLC Freedom Dinner

Guest speaker Jackie Robinson discusses his personal struggles with adopting the philosophy of nonviolence, race relations and the far-reaching efforts of the SCLC.

Anti-Semitism, Israel and SCLC:- A Statement on Press Distortions

This is a document that addresses the impression that the press created reporting that the SCLC was part of a group that condemned Israel and endorsed the policies of the Arab powers. This document also includes the annual report of the president by Dr. King.

Antisemitism

An anonymous group issues a public statement addressing the rising issue of antisemitism throughout the world. According to the document, Soviet Jewry are facing "cultural extinction." As a result, Soviet relations have worsened in Israel. The group indicates that the policies of the U.S.S.R. have caused this wave of antisemitic discrimination and a nation-wide effort will have to help eradicate the movement.

Black Power: Two Views

James Peck, a white civil rights activist, writes an article concerning the path of the Civil Rights Movement. He is beginning to notice that black power and black racism are taking over organizations that had been focused on nonviolence and racial equality.

Huge Crowd Hears King Speak

The University of Pittsburgh's campus newspaper, "The Pitt News," reports that Dr. King's speech drew a larger crowd than "John Kennedy, Theodore Sorenson or Herbert Aptheker when these men spoke at the University." Dr. King answers questions about issues such as Vietnam, Black Power, white backlash and Negro anti-Semitism. He also discussed the importance of an anti-poverty effort, particularly when examining what is spent on the war in Vietnam and the nation's space program.

If I were a Negro

Rabbi I. Usher Kirshblum writes Dr. King to share an article he wrote in the "Jewish Center of Kew Garden Hills Bulletin." The article references the expelling of Congressman Adam Clayton Powell and criticizes the African American response towards his defense. The author states, "If I were a Negro I would not waste my time in defending Powell's wrong acts but would rather speak of the many good acts he performed." Rabbi Kirshblum goes on to praise the views of men like Dr. King and Rev. Roy Wilkins, while rejecting those of Stokely Carmichael.

Letter from Anonymous Sender to MLK

Dr. King's business partner writes to him from the Midtown Office in New York regarding a column in which they are working on. His partner assures Dr. King that the column will be successful and discusses future plans and events to help fund raise and raise awareness about the it.

Letter from Burton Cain to MLK

Burton Caine informs Dr. King of the dilemma with the American Jewish liberal's continuation in the Civil Rights Movement. Caine recounts repeated instances of Negroes singling out Jews in verbal attacks. He emphasizes this irony given that Jews have been active supporters of the Civil Rights Movement. Unsure if Dr. King stands in solidarity with anti-Semitic views, Caine asks Dr. King to issue a statement to clarify his beliefs.

Letter from Daniel A. Jezer to MLK

Rabbi Daniel Jezer, of Temple Beth Shalom in Satellite Beach, Florida, responds to Dr. King's request for contributions to the SCLC. Rabbi Jezer, a past contributor to the SCLC, now feels in a quandary because of ?an anti-Israel, anti-Zionist platform? approved at the Conference of New Politics, which included delegates from the SCLC.

Letter from Harry Fleischman to MLK

Harry Fleischman suggests a text that may be of interest to Dr. King, entitled "We Are Not Summer Patriots." The text highlights anti-Semitism and other efforts to attain equality.

Letter from Herschel Auerbach to MLK

Mr. Auerbach objects to "anti-Semitic and anti-Israel" resolutions adopted at the National Conference of New Politics, at which King was a keynote speaker.

Letter from Jack Hopkins to Senator Morse

In a letter to Senator Wayne L. Morse, Jack Hopkins addresses his personal issues with the United States. He begins with a discussion of the conflict in Vietnam, and believes the United States is handling it poorly. He then expresses his feelings on the Jewish race and the establishment of a Jewish nation. He concludes his letter saying that the United States never tries to solve problems; rather it creates the foundation for a new war.

Letter from Lewis W. Jones to MLK

Lewis W. Jones worries about Dr. King because of the recent turmoil he has faced. He hopes that the struggles King has faced recently does not undermine his position in the movement.

Letter from MLK to Adolph Held

Dr. King writes Adolph Held, President of the Jewish Labor Committee, in response to his inquiry regarding SCLC's position on anti-semitism. Dr. King clarifies a number of distortions produced by the media, and presents the facts of the Chicago Conference of New Politics event throughout the letter.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Eisendrath

In this letter, Dr. King writes to Dr. Eisendrath to clarify SCLC's view on anti-Semitism. Dr. King explains that neither he nor his organization support any resolution calling for black separatism or the condemnation of Israel. He identifies oil as the primary issue in the region and maintains the only way to relieve the tensions between the Middle East and the United States is through peaceful solutions.

Letter from Sonia Schechter to MLK

Sonia Schechter, President of Jewish Cultural Clubs and Societies, sends a financial contribution to the SCLC. Schechter also expresses great admiration to Dr. King for his "heroic leadership."

Letter from Susan Neisuler to MLK

Susan Neisuler encourages Dr. King to speak out against anti-semitism, for there are many Jews who believe that "black power" means anti-semitism.

Letter from the Brith Abraham Fraternal Order to MLK

Representatives of the Brith Abraham Fraternal Order write Dr. King in response to anti-semitic statements made by members of SNCC. They ask that Dr. King provide a statement that condems SNCC's statement due to the fact the Jewish community has strongly supported the civil rights movement.

Letter from Wolfgang S. Homburger to MLK

Mr. Homburger, Assistant Director for the Institute of Transportation Studies in Berkeley, requests additional information from Dr. King before responding to his appeal for funds.

Letter to MLK on Anti-Semitism

M.C. Gettinger, Executive Director at the Atlanta Jewish Community Council, writes to express dismay about alleged remarks about Jews made by Hosea Williams at Spelman College.

Letter to S. R. Wise from MLK Regarding Anti-Semitism

Dr. King responds to a telegram inquiry about SCLC and anti-semitism. Dr. King continues on at length about Negro-Jewish relations, excerpting from his book, "Where Do We Go From Here?"

Letter to the Editor of Chicago Daily News Regarding Israeli Statehood

This letter from Mrs. Irene M. Koch to the editor of the Chicago Daily News addresses the issue of anti-Semitism and the Israeli War in 1967. Mrs. Koch, while not anti-Semitic, does not support the war Israel is prosecuting against its Arab Neighbors. Mrs. Koch draws parallels between Israel's war and the United State's involvement in Vietnam.

MLK Draft on Jackie Robinson and Hall of Fame

Dr. King highlights the achievements of Jackie Robinson in this article about Robinson's induction into baseball's Hall of Fame. Dr. King applauds Robinson for using his celebrity status for the Civil Rights Movement.

MLK's Column on Jackie Robinson's Induction in Hall of Fame

In this column from the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King echoes his speech at the induction of Jackie Robinson into the Baseball Hall of Fame. Robinson not only broke the color barrier in major league baseball, MLK points out, he succeeded in business. MLK lauds Robinson's truth-telling as he spoke out against discrimination in the north and south, by whites and blacks, and on racial and religious grounds.

No, Mr. King: Your Ad in the Times is Not Clear!

This anonymous author writes Dr. King expressing dissent in his viewpoint on riots.

Response from MLK to Paul Yeiter

Dr. King responds to Yeiter's questioning of his support of plans to boycott the 1968 Olympic games. Dr. King argues that Negro athletes have presented specific and reasonable demands to the Olympic Committee, which reflects a valid concern for the social welfare and progress of the whole nation. He commends these athletes for their determination and courageous stand against racism and injustice.

SCLC News Bulletin

This SCLC bulletin to supporters details the organization's progress in numerous locations, including its growing presence in northern cities such as Cleveland, Operation Breadbasket in Chicago, and the Citizenship Education Program. A "Fiscal Facts" section stresses that Dr. King receives no salary from SCLC, nor any other income from his work with the organization.

SCLC News Bulletin for November 1967

This November 1967 news bulletin published by the SCLC contains updates regarding progress of the Civil Rights Movement, excerpts from the President's Annual Report and financial facts for the organization's supporters.

SCLC Newsletter

This SCLC Newsletter discusses topics such as anti-Semitism, progress in various parts of the country, and Operation Breadbasket.

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