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Assassination

Associated Archive Content : 52 results

Letter from Vilna Torres to Mrs. Coretta Scott King

Vilna Torres writes a letter of condolence to Mrs. King after Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from W. P. Ketterer to MLK

W. P. Ketterer sends Dr. King a contribution to honor the late President Kennedy. He expresses his hope for other Americans to support Dr. King in his efforts.

Letter from Wendell K. Jones to MLK and Leon M. Sullivan

This is a letter of support to Dr. King from Wendell K. Jones for his tireless work on behalf of African Americans. Mr. Jones also recognizes Rev. Leon M. Sullivan for helping African Americans in Massachusetts.

Letter of Condolence from MLK

Dr. King expresses his grief as a result of President Kennedy's assassination.

Letter to Dr. Abernathy Regarding MLK Memorial Service

Dr. Abernathy receives this letter from an anonymous sender suggesting that the SCLC plan a memorial service in commemoration of Dr. King on Emancipation Day. The writer provides a list of music and poems that would be appropriate for the occasion.

Letter to Rev. Ralph Abernathy from Mary Bonaventure

The author writes to Rev. Ralph Abernathy to express how impressed she was with the events surrounding Dr. King's funeral. She also made a lengthy request for mementos of the funeral service and Dr. King's speeches.

Lorraine Motel (Now the Civil Rights Museum). Scene of Dr. King's Assassination

This photo comes from the Benedict J. Fernandez "Countdown to Eternity" portfolio.
(Copyright: Benedict J. Fernandez)

Malcolm X Trio Still Marking Time Waiting for Trial

This article documents the legal aftermath of the assassination of Malcolm X on February 21, 1965. It also discusses the three men accused of the killing and reports comments made by the lawyers involved in the case.

People in Action: Our New President

In this article in the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King writes optimistically about the prospects for civil rights in the transition from President Kennedy to President Johnson. He believes that Johnson's Southern-ness may disarm the likes of George Wallace and that the President's proven commitment to civil rights and skills as Majority Leader in the Senate will aid in passing legislation.

People to People: Civil Rights and Negative Normalcy

Dr. King attempts to answer questions from white liberals concerning the progress and importance of the Civil Rights Movement.

Remarks by MLK at the Freedom House Annual Dinner

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for being honored by Freedom House. He also pays tribute to the life and work of John F. Kennedy while encourging others to honor his memory through their dedication to civil rights.

SCLC Newsletter: November-December 1963

Dr. King writes about the assassination of President John F. Kennedy and how it affected the citizens of the United States. King asserts that Kennedy handled international and national issues "with a depth of concern, a breadth of intelligence, and a keen sense of history." Dr. King says that while the question of who killed Kennedy is important, one should ask "what killed him" instead.

Statement from MLK Regarding the Death of Malcolm X

Dr. King comments on the assassination of civil rights activist Malcolm X.

Statement of Mrs. Ruthie Lee Watts Regarding Death Plot on Dr. King

Mrs. Watts submits a statement regarding a plot to assassinate Dr. King. She informs the FBI that a man named Jim Clark planned to kill Dr. King.

Telegram from Committee of Concerned Mothers to MLK

The Committee of Concerned Mothers for Mrs. Malcolm X and Family writes to Dr. King requesting the SCLC to help assist Mrs. Malcolm X and her four children in the wake of her husband's assassination.

Telegram from MLK to President Lyndon B. Johnson

Dr. King urges President Lyndon B. Johnson to conduct a full investigation concerning the government's involvement with Medgar Evers' suspected murderer.

Telegram from Winfield P. Woolf, Jr. to the SCLC Board of Strategy

Just three days before the assassination, Winfield P. Woolf, Jr. asserts that removing Dr. King from the SCLC would be disastrous.

Telegram Request to MLK on the Kennedy Assassination

This Western Union Telegram was sent to Dr. King from Tokyo, requesting commentary concerning John F. Kennedy's assassination for the magazine Midorikawa.

The Sword That Heals

Dr. King, in this article adapted from his book "Why We Can't Wait," evaluates the intimidation the Negro faces as a result of securing freedom. He uses the campaigns in Birmingham, Albany, and Montgomery as backdrops to depict how the use of nonviolent direct action causes unrelenting sacrifice in the face of grave danger. This article was published in this quarterly summer 1964 issue of "The Critic."

U.S. News & World Report: Negro Leaders Tell Their Plans for '64

Past, present and future efforts in the area of civil rights are discussed in interviews of five organizational leaders in the civil rights movement. These leaders are: Whitney M. Young, Jr. of the National Urban League, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. of the SCLC, Roy Wilkins of the NAACP, James L. Farmer of CORE, and James Forman of SNCC.

U.S. News and World Report: Is Insurrection Brewing in U.S.?

This article in the U.S. News and World Report features an interview with Richard H. Sanger, known for his experience in the United States Foreign Service and his abilities to recognize the patterns of political violence.

Wave of Violence Against Blacks

This pamphlet produced by the NAACP, New York Branch, begins with the discussion of a controversial statement made by Senator James Eastland and its adverse affect of increased violence among blacks. Eastland attacked the Supreme Court's desegregation edict by stating, "You are not required to obey any court which passes out such a ruling. In fact, you are obligated to defy it." Newspaper clippings are shown with headlines that illustrate the violence, murder, bombings, and attacks blacks faced.

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