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Bible, O.T.

Associated Archive Content : 285 results

Letter from Alma Opal to Dr. King

Mrs. Alma Opal informs Dr. King that he should use the word "proud," with complete caution. She also sends him a leaflet entitled, "Lawyer Troubles."

Letter from Ann Pooney to MLK

Ann Pooney expresses her sentiments regarding Dr. King's teachings and the state of African Americans. Pooney feels that most blacks have not proven to be good Christians or citizens of the US.

Letter from Bible Student to MLK

The bible student who wrote this letter used biblical references to justify segregation and to persuade Dr. King to cease civil rights demonstrations.

Letter from Bishop K. Chengalvaroya Pillai to MLK

Bishop K. Chengalvaroya Pillai writes Dr. King asking if he can read his recently published book entitled "Light Through an Eastern Window" and write a book review. His book "acquaints the people of the Western World with the thought and ways of life of the Eastern world in relation to the Bible."

Letter from Brown University Charles A. Baldwin to MLK

Charles Baldwin of Brown University asks Dr. King about his travel plans and materials needed for Dr. King's upcoming sermon at the university. He also invites Dr. King to a dinner and luncheon during his visit.

Letter from Charles Crawford to MLK

Charles S. Crawford expresses his dissent with Dr. King on a variety of subjects, one specifically his stance towards President Johnson and the concept of civil disobedience.

Letter from Concerned Citizen to MLK

A citizen writes Dr. King to express their disagreement and distaste for his work within the Civil Rights Movement. The citizen believes that Dr. King's work promotes more hatred and violence in the nation.

Letter from E.B. Putnam to MLK

Mrs. E.B. Putnam writes Dr. King regarding her concerns with the Communist Party's presence in America. She believes they are using race issues to gain power. The author also tells Dr. King that he should focus on leading people to Christ and not on race relations.

Letter from Earl W. Hall to MLK

The National Observer publishes an article entitled "Prophet or Propagandist" to critique Dr. King's political stance on the Vietnam War. Earl Hall objects to these perceptions deliberated in this article and contacts the National Observer to express his concerns. To support his argument, Mr. Hall references biblical prophets from the Old Testament. Mr. Hall communicates this information with Dr. King and informs him of their correlating views on the Vietnam War.

Letter from Esther G. Stone to MLK

Esther G. Stone writes to Dr. King to express her opinions on Negro leadership, American politics, and the Vietnam War. Stone writes that President Lyndon Johnson has done so much for Negroes and that Mrs. Johnson did not deserve the hurtful remarks of Eartha Kitt.

Letter from Irene Bryson to MLK

Mrs. Bryson introduces herself as a former neighbor of the King family on Auburn Avenue and recalls fond memories during those years. She compliments Dr. King "as a God sent preacher," and cites biblical scriptures for him to incorporate in his public speaking. Bryson states, teaching God's word "is what it is going to take to help this sin sick world we are living in."

Letter from Jack Hopkins to Senator Morse

In a letter to Senator Wayne L. Morse, Jack Hopkins addresses his personal issues with the United States. He begins with a discussion of the conflict in Vietnam, and believes the United States is handling it poorly. He then expresses his feelings on the Jewish race and the establishment of a Jewish nation. He concludes his letter saying that the United States never tries to solve problems; rather it creates the foundation for a new war.

Letter from Janet Somerville to MLK

Janet Somerville writes to Dr. King, expressing how he has been a renewal of hope for her. She also thanks Dr. King, his family and the SCLC for their hospitality during her visit to Atlanta.

Letter from Jim Vickrey to Thomas Offenburger

Jim Vickrey of Auburn University requests that Thomas Offenburger, Director of the SCLC Office of Public Relations, provides information regarding Dr. King's background.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Joan Daves, Literary Agent to Dr. King, addresses the correspondence, to Dr. King. The letter includes photostats of reviews for Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" The Chicago Tribune, New York Times Daily and Washington Star are just a couple of the newspapers that published reviews for the book.

Letter from Juanita Kurtza to MLK

Juanita Kurtza sends Dr. King a list of scriptures to encourage him in his work. She also apologizes for her inability to send money.

Letter from Leonard Dorsey to MLK

Leonard Dorsey requests Dr. King begin teaching the subject of Divine Retribution.

Letter from Librarian Olive Ann Tamborelle to MLK

Olive Ann Tamborelle, Director of the Teaneck Public Library, asks Dr. King to name the book that has had the greatest effect on his life, other than The Bible. She informs him that the information will be used in an exhibit for National Library Week.

Letter from Mrs. Glenn Durbin to MLK

Mrs. Glenn Durbin writes to Dr. King expressing her opposing views on Communism.

Letter from Mrs. Zabelle Tourian to MLK

Zabelle Tourian expresses her support for Dr. King, relaying several short statements regarding famous African American persons of recent history.

Letter from Percival Ennis to MLK

Percival Ennis, president of the Universal Negro Improvement Association in British Honduras, asks Dr. King if he is able to visit British Honduras and speak to his organization.

Letter from President of Yugoslav Baptist Union to MLK

The President of the Yugoslav Baptist Union writes excitedly as he finds out Dr. King will be in his country. He requests that Dr. King stop by the church or his home during his short visit.

Letter from Robert Johnson to MLK

The author requests Dr. King to encourage black people to put away their wickedness so the Lord can take care of them.

Letter from Robert L. Pino to MLK

Mr. Pino, Chairman of the Local Union 2603 Civil Rights Committee of Lackawanna, New York, praises Dr. King's efforts in Albany, Georgia.

Letter from T. Z. Riggins to MLK

T. Z. Riggins writes Dr. King a thoughtful letter commending his leadership and the influence he brings to America. Aside from Abraham Lincoln, Riggins views Dr. King as the only leader who can bring people together. Riggins believes that Dr. King's job was assigned to him by God and expresses his pride that Dr. King was chosen to "lay the foundation" for the US.

Letter from Vivian C. Kelley to MLK and President Kennedy

Vivian C. Kelley offers her support to Dr. King in his continued efforts in the Civil Rights Movement. Mrs. Kelley shares with Dr. King a letter in which she asks President John F. Kennedy to address issues of discrimination in the United States. In response to Mrs. Kelly, Lee C. White, Assistant Special Counsel to the President, expresses thanks on the behalf of President John F. Kennedy and assures Mrs. Kelley the President and the Administration are dedicated to ending discrimination and securing the Constitutional Rights of all Americans.

Letter from Warrington Allsop to MLK

During the fall of 1958, Dr. King was stabbed by an African American woman during a book signing in Harlem, an event that nearly cost him his life. Following this event, Warrington Allsop sends his support and well-wishes for Dr. King's immediate recovery.

Letter from William W. Boyer to MLK

This Letter from William W. Boyer, Chairman of the Convocations Committee, to Dr. King informs Dr. King the transcription of his "Future of Integration" speech to the Kansas State University academic community has arrived. A copy of the transcription will be published in Issues 1968.
This enclosed transcription of his speech addresses many varied issues affecting American society.

Letter from Wilma Hopkins to MLK

Mrs. Hopkins sends prayers and Bible scriptures to Dr. King to emotionally support him during his jail sentence in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter to MLK from the Daughters of Zion

H.B. Williams, the Shepherdess of the Daughters of Zion, sent this letter to Dr. King saying that they had taken notice to his actions in the fight for civil equality. Williams writes that they do not participate in demonstrations, because that has caused their organization "downfall in ancient times." She further explains that this has "turned into a Holy war, and it is no longer a fight for equality and rights to vote."

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