Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Birmingham, 1963

Associated Archive Content : 112 results

Speech at Chicago Freedom Movement Rally

Dr. King speaks of the urgent need to address issues in the city such as deplorable housing conditions, discrimination in employment, segregation and overcrowded schools. He urges his listeners to commit to fill up the jails if necessary, register every eligible Negro to vote, withhold rent from slumlords, withdraw economic support from companies that don't hire Negroes, and support Negro-owned businesses. He stresses the importance of using nonviolent methods.

Speech in Jackson, Mississippi

Dr. King addresses supporters in Jackson, Mississippi during his statewide tour for the 1968 Poor People's Campaign. He speaks of his excitement about the number of blacks in Mississippi that participated in the last congressional election. He emphasizes that the Poor People's Campaign cannot be successful without a strong coalition of organizations that see the need to combat poverty. King would be assassinated in Memphis two weeks after making this speech.

Speeches by the Leaders

In this booklet, the NAACP compiled famous speeches from the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Included are speeches from A. Philip Randolph, Roy Wilkins, James Farmer, Rev. Eugene Carson Blake, Rabbi Joachim Prinz, Whitney M. Young, Matthew Ahmann, John Lewis, Walter Reuther, and Dr. King. The booklet concludes with a pledge and a picture of the throng of supporters that attended the event. test

Spring Mobilization Background Material

The Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam announces Dr. King as its speaker for their April 15 march. In addition, this document offers background information on the conflict in Vietnam.

Statement by MLK Regarding His Five-Day Jail Sentence in Birmingham

Dr. King releases a statement regarding his return to Birmingham, Alabama to serve a five-day jail sentence. He states that he is happy to serve the sentence, but sad that the Supreme Court did not "uphold the rights of individual citizens." He also questions why the United States' resources are being used to fund the Vietnam War rather than to help the poor.

Statement on The Negro's Political and Economic Power

Dr. King discusses the inferior political and economic power of the American Negro against the backdrop of emerging Black Power organizations. He reveals several new non-violent programs the SCLC targeted at economic and social justice: youth training and political reformation in the South. It is in accordance with the philosophy of non-violence that Dr. King believes the vast majority of Negroes will birth a "community in which neither power nor dignity will be black or white."

Statistics on Birmingham, Alabama

This sheet shows Negro vs. White Populations in Birmingham, Alabama in regards to voting. It also shows the working wages of the Negro Population according to an article in the Saturday Evening Post.

Telegram from Civil Rights Leaders to President Kennedy

Members of the SCLC and prominent civil rights leaders request an immediate conference with President John F. Kennedy regarding the 1963 Birmingham church bombing.

Telegram from Lee C. White to MLK

Lee C. White, Assistant Special Counsel to the President, confirms a meeting with President Kennedy and Dr. King to discuss the Birmingham bombing incident.

Telegram from Nelson Rockefeller on Church Bombing

New York Governor Nelson Rockefeller comments on the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombings and expresses his sympathy to the families of the four children who were killed.

Temporary Injunction by City of Birmingham Against Wyatt Tee Walker

Judge W. A. Jenkins issues a temporary injunction against Wyatt Tee Walker based on the affidavits of Captain G. V. Evans and Captain George Wall. The order prohibits involvement with "mass street parades or mass processions or like demonstrations without a permit" and any other "acts calculated to cause breaches of the peace" in Birmingham, Alabama.

The Blame in Birmingham

The article, "The Blame in Birmingham", discusses the situation in Birmingham where four little girls were killed during a Sunday school class when a bomb was detonated. Governor Wallace's reaction and the consequences of the actions are mentioned in the article.

The Chicago Plan

Dr. King laments over Chicago becoming so much like the South that many African Americans moved north to get away from. Dr. King lays out reasons why African Americans suffer more in Chicago than any other northern city and provides directions to correct the problem.

The Chicago Plan

Dr. King makes a public statement addressing the poor economic and housing conditions in the North. Dr. King specifically identifies Chicago as the prototype for the conditions occurring within this region. He describes a three phase plan detailing how to properly address and manage the problems effectively.

The Civil Rights Struggle in the United States Today

This pamphlet, published by the Association of the Bar of the City of New York, is a transcript of an address delivered by Dr. King titled "The Civil Rights Struggle in the United States Today." In his first speech before the organization, Dr. King recounts the history of the global civil rights movement.

The Danger of A Little Progress

In Dr. King's article, The Danger of a Little Progress, he discusses the work of the SCLC and SNCC in correlation to statistics regarding integrated housing and schools, as well as discrimination in employment. Dr. King concludes that there has been little progress among blacks in Atlanta statistically.

The Miami Herald: Who Threw the Bomb?

In this newspaper clipping, "Washington Post" columnist Charles Morgan Jr. argues that the responsibility for the Birmingham bombings lies with the entire community.

The Negro Speaks

Several prominent African Americans describe the issues that plague the black community. Some of these issues include poverty, segregation, civil rights and race relations.

The Sword That Heals

Dr. King, in this article adapted from his book "Why We Can't Wait," evaluates the intimidation the Negro faces as a result of securing freedom. He uses the campaigns in Birmingham, Albany, and Montgomery as backdrops to depict how the use of nonviolent direct action causes unrelenting sacrifice in the face of grave danger. This article was published in this quarterly summer 1964 issue of "The Critic."

The Witness: MLK Writes from Birmingham Jail

"The Witness" publishes the second part of Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham City Jail." In this pivotal document, Dr. King expresses dissatisfaction with the white moderate and the white church regarding their silent stance on segregation and discrimination. He urges individuals to understand the delays, broken promises, and intimidation Negroes face to secure their freedom.

Transcript of National Educational Television's For Freedom Now

For Freedom Now, with host Dr. Kenneth Clark, is television’s first exchange of ideas by the leaders of five organizations engaged in securing full civil rights for Negroes. Featured guests are Dr. King of SCLC, Whitney Young of the National Urban League, James Farmer of CORE, James Forman of SNCC, and Roy Wilkins of the NAACP.

We Return to Birmingham Jail to Bear Witness

On his way to turn themselves in to Birmingham jail again in 1967, Dr. King writes this article in longhand, asserting the purposes of the civil rights activists' civil disobedience. Their unjust incarceration, he states, will allow them to bear witness to an unjust justice system, from Bull Connor's dogs to the US Supreme Court. The Court had just issued a decision supporting Connor's injunction forbidding the protests of the Birmingham campaign, which had led to his first incarceration there in 1963.

Pages