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Christian Education

Associated Archive Content : 125 results

Letter from John to MLK

John discusses some points on religious ethics with Dr. King and offers gratitude for a Labor Day dinner with the King family.

Letter from Lily E. Sternlow to MLK

With topics ranging from "The Poor Pay More for Less" to the featured article "Malawi's Anti-Christian Atrocities - A Shame on Africa," this edition of "Awake" magazine is forwarded by Lily Sternlow to Dr. King. After receiving word of Dr. King's travels to Africa, Sternlow brings attention to issues surrounding Christian witnesses in Malawi.

Letter From Maria Diego to Dr. King

Maria Diego requests assistance from Dr. King to aid in funding a new Catholic school building in Japan.

Letter from Mary E. Bull to MLK

Mary Bull asks Dr. King to reply to an earlier letter, of which she encloses a copy. Mrs. Bull asserts that the Civil Rights Movement made excellent progress up to 1966, but afterwards seemed divided. She wants to know the reasons for this division and asks Dr. King to bring back the supporters who have strayed.

Letter from Mary Eunice to MLK

Mary Eunice writes Dr. King offering her appreciation for the program he held in San Diego, California. Ms. Eunice notifies Dr. King that she will send him pictures from the program.

Letter from MLK to Geraldine Fothergill

Dr. King informs Mrs. Fothergill that her idea to house African American students through a coordinated church effort has merit. He suggests that she contact Reverend Richard Battles of the Mount Olives Baptist Church in Hartford, Connecticut, who is a representative of the SCLC and gauge his reaction to the idea.

Letter from Mrs. Edna E. Williams to MLK

Mrs. Edna E. Williams invites Dr. King to attend The Friendship Baptist Church's annual Harry W. Knight Award and Mortgage Retirement Fund Banquet.

Letter from Philip Harnden to MLK

After reading Dr. King's book, "Why We Can't Wait," Philip Harnden, a sophomore at Wheaton College, writes Dr. King expressing his newly changed insight on the Negro struggle. Mr. Harnden inquires about Dr. King's nonviolent approach and the black community beginning to abandon nonviolence by adopting more aggressive means to achieve their goals.

Letter from Phyllis Light to the NAACP

Mrs. Light argues that the goals of the NAACP are too low. She compares the efforts of the movement to those of Hitler, Mussolini, Napoleon, and Caesar. Because of these comparisons, Mrs. Light promotes segregation amongst the races and accuses educated African Americans of abandoning their culture.

Letter from Prarthana Samaj Bombay (India) to MLK

The former ambassador of India to the United States previously wrote Dr. King, inviting him to the Centenary Celebrations. The author recalls this invitation and references the history of Bombay's Prarthana Samaj. The organization is founded on the betterment of society, religion and education. The Prarthana Samaj would be proud to welcome Dr. King, as he is an "apostle" of Mahatma Gandhi.

Letter from Professor Clyde Manschreck to MLK

Clyde L. Manschreck, a professor of church history at the Methodist Theological School in Ohio, asks permission to include "Letter from Birmingham City Jail" in his upcoming collection entitled "History of Christianity from the Reformation to the Present," as well as the letter that inspired it.

Letter from Rene Remond to MLK

The "Centre Catholique des Intellectuels Francais" is an organization focused on raising the consciousness levels of its members through public conferences, debates, and discussions. Rene Remond informs Dr. King that they have enclosed additional information to prepare him on the discussion involving Christians and violence.

Letter from Rev. Hazel E. Foster to MLK

Reverend Hazel Foster writes to Dr. King in support of his continuous struggle. He talks about memorizing the Sermon on the Mount and the importance to him and leaders like Gandhi. He offers words of encouragement and prays that Dr. King may find peace during these hard times.

Letter from Richard Allen to MLK

Reverend R. Allen requests Dr. King's written contribution for a special issue of "The Leader" on race relations. "The Leader" is a Christian newspaper that is distributed in different parts of England.

Letter from Roland Smith to MLK

Roland Smith requests that Dr. King prepare a list of themes for the Baptist Training Union. Smith encloses a copy of themes from the previous year for Dr. King to use as a template.

Letter from Tadashi Akaishi to MLK

Tadashi Akaishi, Associate Book Editor for John Knox Press, writes Dr. King requesting to use his endorsement for Dr. Kyle Haselden's book "Mandate for White Christians" as the book's preface. The endorsement was initially to be included on the book's cover, but Akaishi feels that it is so well written that he now asks permission to use it as the preface.

Letter from Wiley Bell to MLK

Inspired by Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham City Jail," Wiley Bell thanks Dr. King for the "heart warming and heart rending article." Bell tells Dr. King that his letter has inspired his studies as a fellow clergyman.

Letter from William Adams to MLK

William Adams from the New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary writes Dr. King informing him of political matters in New York City, which may hinder the civil rights efforts of African Americans.

Levels of Love

Dr. King describes five levels of love, from lowest to highest: utilitarian love, friendship, romantic love, humanitarian love, and agape. The last he refers to as Christian love, the love of God operating in the human heart. The first four, he states, are love for one’s own sake. The fifth is love for another person for their sake. This sermon was delivered by Dr. King on May 21, 1967 at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia.

Liberalism

Dr. King notes a view of liberalism in Harry Emerson Fosdick’s “The Modern Use of the Bible.”

Love and Forgiveness

This is a speech entitled "Love and Forgiveness" that Dr. King delivered at the American Baptist Convention meeting in Atlantic City, New Jersey. Jesus Christ and segregation serve as the major topics for this speech. Dr. King makes the compelling statements that "Jesus decided to meet hate with love," and that "segregation is still the Negro's burden and America's shame."

Men Who Live Differently

James E. Will shares a Christian perspective on conformity and its relation to humanity and God.

MLK Debuts the Book of the Year

This "Christian Century" ad debuts Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait."

MLK Handwritten Notes

Dr. King outlines some principles regarding 'Love' and uses Reinhold Niebuhr as a reference.

MLK in Memoriam

Following Dr. King's assassination, this tribute highlights King's life and the impact he had on the world. It includes a reading from "The Negro American: A Documentary History," an audio recording of Dr. King's "I Have a Dream Speech" and his eulogy. test2

MLK Outline on Preaching Ministry

Dr. King outlines the development of the preaching ministry. As an aspiring minister, Dr. King expresses how he wishes to develop his own ministry and provides ideas of the message he desires to share.

MLK's Examination Book for Bible Course

Dr. King writes this essay about the problems Habakkuk presents to Jehovah. He argues that God no longer judges humanity as a collective entity, but as individuals within humanity.

MLK's Perception of God and Repenting

Dr. King quotes a scripture from the Bible elaborating on God's inability to repent or do evil.

National Conference on Christian Education Brochure

Dr. King was a featured guest speaker of the National Conference on Christian Education. This pamphlet lists the events of the program occurring during August 19-22 of 1958.

Newsletter from Rev. Ellis Vanderbilt

On April 14, 1968, a group of Black and White Christians met to form the first integrated Baptist Church in South Carolina. The congregation bought an abandoned church, however, the church members needed additional financial assistance, so the Reverend Vanderbilt solicited contributions of at least $100.00.

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