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Christianity, History

Associated Archive Content : 275 results

"A Knock At Midnight"

This is a draft of the sermon Dr. King wrote comparing a story from the Bible in St. Luke to the struggle to obtain equality and civil rights.

"Discerning the Signs of History"

Dr. King believes that there are lessons in understanding the process of history, that evil carries the seed of destruction and that militarism is ultimately suicidal. Dr. King states that "history teaches the lesson that all reality hinges on moral foundations."

"One Solitary Life"

The document, shown here, contains a narrative describing Jesus, entitled "One Solitary Life." Dr. King would use this narrative, in one of his last and most famous sermons "The Drum Major Instinct." The sermon was delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church, February 4, 1968, exactly two months before his untimely assassination.

"The American Dream"

This transcription of the commencement address delivered by Dr. King at Lincoln University on June 6 1961.

"The Drum Major Instinct" Ebenezer Baptist Church

The Drum Major Instinct, a sermon delivered by Dr. King at the Atlanta Ebenezer Baptist Church, frames the “instinct” as being responsible for the social ills of the world. Dr. King proclaims that racial inequality in America and the war in Vietnam are the result of nations engaging in a “bitter colossal contest for supremacy.” He suggests that the only way to end this “suicidal thrust” is to abide by an altered definition of the instinct – the definition of Jesus Christ.

A Challenge to the Churches and Synagogues

In this document, Dr. King addressed the Conference on Religion and Race in Chicago, Illinois. He reprimands the Church and Synagogue for being silent or being a "silent partner of the status quo." Dr. King tells them that they must recapture its focus on human rights or risk becoming irrelevant. In closing, Dr. King challenges himself along with these religious institutions to make a choice; either continue to follow the "status quo" or "give ourselves unreservedly to God and his kingdom."

A Christian Movement in a Revolutionary Age

In this address, Dr. King fuses the philosophies in the Old and New Testament regarding revolutionary social change. He argues that the most creative and constructive revolutionary force for change is one that combines the Old Testament’s “righteousness and justice that flow down like a mighty stream” with the New Testament’s call to love one’s enemies and bless those who persecute you. He asserts that God has been working actively since the time of Moses for the freedom and perfection of people and society. Dr.

A Perspective for Christian Peace Concern

Brewster Kneen writes about the roles that Christians and the church play in the peace-making process. He cites Saint Peter and Saint Luke to support his argument.

A Religion of Doing

Dr. King delivered this sermon at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church on July 4, 1954. In the sermon, Dr. King asserts the importance of active religion over passive theoretical practice. Citing the Book of Matthew, he maintains that belief and action must be united, as action is the crux of true religion. He proclaims that the church has to be a passage of the "dynamic force" that encourages action of its members.

A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart

"A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart" by Dr. King discusses the importance of creating a synthesis of opposites and characteristics of one engaged in shrewd thinking with a loving spirit.

Address by MLK at 47th NAACP Annual Convention

Dr. King addresses the audience at the 47th NAACP annual convention in San Francisco, California. King begins with background information of slavery and its physical and mental effects on Africans, then tells the "Montgomery Story." This story begins with a mental transformation among blacks, which led to the Montgomery boycott. As a result of the boycott, blacks were empowered and began fighting injustice and seeking changes in unfair legislation.

Address by MLK at the Washington, DC Prayer Pilgrimage for Freedom

Dr. King gives an address at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D. C. regarding race relations and the struggle for justice and racial equality in America. King discusses the responsibility of the President, Congress, and federal courts to ensure all blacks the have the opportunity and the right to vote. King closes by asserting that everyone must stand firm in faith and act only in love and nonviolence in the fight for these rights.

Advice for Living

Dr. King addresses questions in the "Advice for Living" column published in Ebony Magazine on February 12, 1958.

Anabaptists

Dr. King outlines historical information regarding the Anabaptists and the religious philosophy of the group.

Angeology

Dr. King cites the reference in Isaiah 6:2 to a seraphim, likely "a winged human figure."

Annihilationism

Dr. King defines annihilationism as a belief regarding the death of the wicked.

Answer to a Perplexing Question

Dr. King preaches about faith, based on Matthew 17:14-20, and applies it to the Civil Rights Movement. He defines faith as cooperating with God by surrendering to God's will so that His strength may act freely through us. He asserts that faith, intellect, and work must blend together.

Apocalyptic Religion

Dr. King quotes John Oman's "the Natural and The Supernatural."

Apologist

Dr. King cites information regarding the historical background of the Apologists and their role in defending Christianity.

Aquinas, Thomas

Dr. King notes biographical information about Thomas Aquinas.

Arianism

Dr. King writes about Arianism, a view named after Arius of Alexandria. Arianism acknowledges the divinity of God the father and Jesus the son; however, under this doctrine Jesus is subordinate to God.

Arnobius

Dr. King gives information on fourth century teacher, Arnobius and his conversion to Christianity.

Augustinanism

Dr. King writes notes on Saint Augustine, Bishop of Hippo, and his "vast theological system" called Augustinianism. Dr. King describes the system as a comprehensive church philosophy that was very pessimistic about the nature of man.

Barth and Brunner

Dr. King notes the views of Swiss theologians Karl Barth and Emil Brunner on God, making reference to Soren Kierkegaard (SK).

Bayard Rustin: Right to Work Laws

This booklet, written chiefly by Bayard Rustin, suggests that the "Right to Work" laws handicap minorities in the American workforce. The "Right to Work" law is a statute that bans union security agreements, which Rustin posits is undemocratic and assists in exploiting and perpetuating American poverty.

Bernard of Clairvaux

Dr. King writes about Bernard of Clairvaux and his idea of the character of the ideal Christian.

Bible

Dr. King compares the views of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Friedrich Schleiermacher on the Christian Bible.

Bible

Dr. King quotes John Ruskin and Thomas Carlyle on the significance of the Bible.

Bible 252

This exam from a course entitled "Bible 252" lists forty-eight questions regarding Biblical knowledge.

Bibliography Compiled by MLK

This handwritten bibliography documents texts that discuss theology.

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