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Christianity, History

Associated Archive Content : 275 results

Letter from Phyllis Light to the NAACP

Mrs. Light argues that the goals of the NAACP are too low. She compares the efforts of the movement to those of Hitler, Mussolini, Napoleon, and Caesar. Because of these comparisons, Mrs. Light promotes segregation amongst the races and accuses educated African Americans of abandoning their culture.

Letter from President of Yugoslav Baptist Union to MLK

The President of the Yugoslav Baptist Union writes excitedly as he finds out Dr. King will be in his country. He requests that Dr. King stop by the church or his home during his short visit.

Letter from Professor Clyde Manschreck to MLK

Clyde L. Manschreck, a professor of church history at the Methodist Theological School in Ohio, asks permission to include "Letter from Birmingham City Jail" in his upcoming collection entitled "History of Christianity from the Reformation to the Present," as well as the letter that inspired it.

Letter from Ralph H. Eaton to MLK

Ralph Eaton explains to Dr. King why he will no longer send contributions to the SCLC.

Letter from Rev. Hazel E. Foster to MLK

Reverend Hazel Foster writes to Dr. King in support of his continuous struggle. He talks about memorizing the Sermon on the Mount and the importance to him and leaders like Gandhi. He offers words of encouragement and prays that Dr. King may find peace during these hard times.

Letter from Rev. Jesse H. Williams to MLK

Reverend Jesse H. Williams, Pastor of Saint Luke Community Christian Church, invites Dr. King to speak at his church.

Letter from Rev. L. K. Jackson to MLK

Reverend L. K. Jackson thanks Dr. King for his hospitality while he was in Atlanta. Jackson states that his only regret was not seeing more of Dr. King and his wife.

Letter from Rosamond Reynolds to MLK

Rosamond C. Reynolds informs Dr. King that the Fifth General Assembly of the Unitarian Universalist Association adopted a comprehensive Statement of Consensus on Racial Justice. The statement reflects "the preponderance of opinion of the denomination, its members, and its churches, on the problems of segregation, discrimination, racial violence, education, housing..."

Letter from student Sue Moranian to MLK

Sue Moranian, a fourteen year old white girl, writes Dr. King and encloses a $2.00 contribution to assist in endeavors to help blacks reach racial equality.

Levels of Love

Dr. King describes five levels of love, from lowest to highest: utilitarian love, friendship, romantic love, humanitarian love, and agape. The last he refers to as Christian love, the love of God operating in the human heart. The first four, he states, are love for one’s own sake. The fifth is love for another person for their sake. This sermon was delivered by Dr. King on May 21, 1967 at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia.

List of Historical Theologians and Events

Here, Dr. King lists a series of historical theologians and events dating from the second to nineteenth centuries.

Love and Forgiveness

This is a speech entitled "Love and Forgiveness" that Dr. King delivered at the American Baptist Convention meeting in Atlantic City, New Jersey. Jesus Christ and segregation serve as the major topics for this speech. Dr. King makes the compelling statements that "Jesus decided to meet hate with love," and that "segregation is still the Negro's burden and America's shame."

Love of God

Dr. King cites a scripture from the biblical book of Isaiah referencing God's goal to redeem all mankind.

Loving Your Enemies

Dr. King's sermon "Love Your Enemies" is inspired by the life and message of Jesus Christ. According to the Bible, one must love not only those who love them, but also those who attempt to harm them. Dr. King is empathetic towards those who find it difficult to follow this practice, but regards it as necessary.

Luther

Dr. King references the political philosophy Martin Luther and quotes, "I will side always with him, however unjust, who endures rebellion and against him who rebels, however unjust."

Making the Best of a Bad Mess

In this sermon, Dr. King discusses the letter Paul sent to Titus while he was in Crete. According to the letter, Crete was a terrible place for Christians, and Titus may have been confused as to why he was left there. Paul wrote to him saying that he left him there to make the situation better for the other people there. That is how one makes the best out of a bad mess.

Making the Best of A Bad Mess

This text of Dr. King's "Making the Best of a Bad Mess" sermon encourages the congregation at Ebenezer Baptist Church to remain faithful in times of destitution. He makes clear the point that happiness is not found, but is instead created.

Marcian

Dr. King highlights biographical information on Marcian, a second-century reformer.

Men Who Live Differently

James E. Will shares a Christian perspective on conformity and its relation to humanity and God.

Miracle

Dr. King quotes statements from Harry E. Fosdick's "Modern Use of the Bible" regarding the definition of a miracle.

Miracles

Dr. King paraphrases the Old Testament scripture of Exodus chapter 13, verse 22, in which God leads the Israelites with a cloud by day and a a pillar of fire by night.

MLK Examination Book for Bible Course

Dr. King answers a number of questions for an exam in his Bible course. He covers diverse topics, including prophecy and the Book of Job.

MLK on Christian Love

In this statement, Dr. King corrects "what may be a false impression." King states that while he does discuss the Christian way of love and non-violence as a tool to unify blacks in the Movement, integration is still necessary in order to truly obtain change.

MLK Organizes Campaign for Voters

Dr. King announces a "nationwide bipartisan drive to get out the vote on election day." King's campaign charges religious leaders across the USA to help mobilize people to vote for the upcoming presidential election.

MLK Sermon Notes

Dr. King writes notes regarding the story of Jesus and the healing of the paralytic. Jesus asked the crippled man, "will thou be made whole?" Dr. King states that some people are happy to be crippled because they lack the responsibilities of life that a healthy man has, and many people cater to their needs, but cautions against this attitude.

MLK Speech at SCLC Staff Retreat

Dr. King addresses the staff of the SCLC at a retreat in Frogmore, South Carolina. He divides his speech into three parts: "whence we have come, where we have come, and where do we go from here." Dr. King thoroughly discusses his thoughts on Communism, the practice of nonviolence, the belief that racism is an "ontological affirmation,"and the weaknesses of Black Power.

MLK Writes on Miracles

Dr. King outlines Dr. James Moffatt's views on students understanding of new testament.

Monarchianism

Dr. King defines the doctrine monarchianism as "a doctrine stressing the unity of the Godhead as against the ultimately prevailing tendency to affirm personal distinctions within the Godhead."

Monotheism

Dr. King cites passages in the sixth century BCE Second Isaiah (chapters 40-55) as the first clear evidence of monotheism.

Monothelitism

Dr. King outlines the principles of Monothelitism.

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