Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Church and Race Relations

Associated Archive Content : 185 results

"A Knock At Midnight"

This is a draft of the sermon Dr. King wrote comparing a story from the Bible in St. Luke to the struggle to obtain equality and civil rights.

1963 World Day of Prayer

This brochure from the United Church Women of Atlanta, sent to Ms. Coretta Scott King, outlines the agenda for 1965 World Day of Prayer. The brochure allso included is a schedule of the organization's calendar of events.

A Challenge to the Churches and Synagogues

Dr. King expresses concern for the religious institutions of America. His concern is centered on the obligation that churches and synagogues have to advance civil rights and desegregation, while he goes on to reveal the parallels and connections between religion and society's values.

A Challenge to the Churches and Synagogues

In this document, Dr. King addressed the Conference on Religion and Race in Chicago, Illinois. He reprimands the Church and Synagogue for being silent or being a "silent partner of the status quo." Dr. King tells them that they must recapture its focus on human rights or risk becoming irrelevant. In closing, Dr. King challenges himself along with these religious institutions to make a choice; either continue to follow the "status quo" or "give ourselves unreservedly to God and his kingdom."

A Knock At Midnight

In a tape-recorded address to the Riverside Church in New York City, Dr. King compares the civil rights struggle to a parable from St. Luke. His sermon specifically tackles contemporary social issues such as segregation, discrimination, and the philosophy of nonviolence. In addition, Dr. King explores the role of the church in dealing with such problems.

A Letter Enclosing an Address by George B. Nesbitt

In an address at the CME Church Conference, George B. Nesbitt analyzes the role of the church during the Civil Rights Movement. During slavery, the church was a place of refuge and hope, but now individuals are beginning to lose their faith in the church.

A Perspective for Christian Peace Concern

Brewster Kneen writes about the roles that Christians and the church play in the peace-making process. He cites Saint Peter and Saint Luke to support his argument.

A Religion of Doing

Dr. King delivered this sermon at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church on July 4, 1954. In the sermon, Dr. King asserts the importance of active religion over passive theoretical practice. Citing the Book of Matthew, he maintains that belief and action must be united, as action is the crux of true religion. He proclaims that the church has to be a passage of the "dynamic force" that encourages action of its members.

A Statement to the South and Nation

The Southern Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration issued this statement. The document states that a world-wide campaign for social and political freedom shows an international plight for human dignity. As America is one of the two most powerful nations in the world, "the unresolved problem of civil rights becomes the most crucial issue." There is contradiction between the freedom America proclaims and the actual practice of civil liberties and democracy. Dr.

A Statement to the South and Nation

This seemingly unexceptional document signifies the birth of the SCLC. Dr. King, Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth and Rev. C. K. Steele assembled a consortium of leaders in Atlanta following the end of the Montgomery Bus Boycott. The Southern Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration issued this statement that addresses the intimidation, discrimination and economic disparity Negroes face in the South. The statement appeals to the federal government to intervene against assaults that block basic civil rights.

Address at a Conference of Religious Leaders Under the Sponsorship of the President's Committee on Government Contracts

Dr. King addresses a delegation of religious leaders at a conference hosted by the President's Committee on Government Contracts. In this pivotal speech, Dr. King outlines the responsibilites of clergymen and government officials in combating poverty and economic discrimination. He stresses the need for lay leaders and representatives of government to bodly speak out against the vestiges of discrimination that continuously hinder the economic and social progress of Negroes in America.

Address by Jackie Robinson at SCLC Freedom Dinner

Guest speaker Jackie Robinson discusses his personal struggles with adopting the philosophy of nonviolence, race relations and the far-reaching efforts of the SCLC.

Address by MLK at SCLC Ministers Conference

Dr. King addresses those in attendance at the Southern Christian Ministers Conference. He brings words of encouragement to those working diligently for social change in Mississippi. He speaks words of promise that things will change since the Supreme Court has ruled segregation unconstitutional and he gives examples of how things are slowly changing. However, he acknowledges that there is still much work to be done, especially in the South. Dr. King lists actions that must be at the top of everyone's list to be taken care of.

Address by MLK at the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary

In his address to the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, Dr. King discusses the subject of the "Church on the Frontier of Racial Tension." King describes the crisis state of the US as it passes from an old order of segregation to a new order of integration, proclaiming that this is both a moral issues as well as a political issues. King implores the church to open the channels of communication between races and institute social reform, especially economic justice. Lastly, he invites all people to step into the new age with understanding and creative good will in their hearts.

Address by MLK to the National Press Club

During an address to the National Press Club in Washington, Dr. King declares the time for racial justice has arrived.

Address to AFL-CIO New York City District 65

Dr. King speaks to the District 65 AFL-CIO to address the importance of job opportunities in the northern and southern regions of the United States. He explains that the labor movement must stay active in order to gain civil rights and equal pay for African American workers.

Advice for Living

Dr. King addresses questions in the "Advice for Living" column published in Ebony Magazine on February 12, 1958.

Agenda of the General Committee of the Department of Racial and Cultural Relations

This document is an agenda and lists meeting minutes regarding the approval of actions, nominations, budget, and miscellaneous items for the Department of Racial and Cultural Relations.

Albany Movement Position Paper

The Albany Movement expresses the damages of segregation and outlines their requests for peaceful integration.

Annual Address Delivered at the First Annual Institute on Nonviolence and Social Change

Dr. King's speech at the First Annual Institute of Non-Violence and Social Change addresses many issues regarding the African American. The most recurring issues are of obtaining and maintaining freedom, equality and personal dignity.

Annual Report Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Operation Breadbasket, unemployment, poverty, nonviolence, Negro voter registration, and a financial report are just several of the topics covered in this informational pamphlet detailing the ways in which monies were divided amongst the many functions of the SCLC.

Answer to a Perplexing Question

Dr. King preaches about faith, based on Matthew 17:14-20, and applies it to the Civil Rights Movement. He defines faith as cooperating with God by surrendering to God's will so that His strength may act freely through us. He asserts that faith, intellect, and work must blend together.

Atlanta SCLC Prexy Jailed in Albany

During a prayer pilgrimage in Albany, Georgia Rev. John A. Middleton, Pastor of Atlanta's Allen Temple A. M. E. Church, and 75 other religious leaders were jailed.

Background Paper on the Student Sit-in Protest Movement

The Division of Racial Minorities and the Division of Christian Citizenship of the National Council of the Protestant Episcopal Church give some background information on the "sit-in protest movement" and list three points in summary.

Biographical Sketch of Dr. Ralph David Avernathy

This biographical sketch of Dr. Abernathy outlines his positions, recognitions, education, travel experience and personal life. Dr. Abernathy served as President of the SCLC after Dr. King's death and also served as a member of the NAACP, and Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc.

Black Power

This is a chapter sermon for Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go From Here?" The civil rights leader traces the early development of Black Power and its eventual surge onto the national political scene. Though understood as a direct opposition to the nonviolent movement that organizations like SCLC, CORE, and SNCC originally supported, King describes Black Power as a "disappointment wrapped in despair."

Black Power and the American Christ

The Christian Century published this article by historian and civil rights activist Vincent Harding in its June 4, 1967 issue. In the essay, Harding, friend, associate, and speech writer for Dr. King, claims that Eurocentric Christianity antagonized the Black Power Movement.

Bread at Midnight

"The Mennonite," issued by The Board of Education and Publication of the General Conference Mennonite Church, features an article by Dr. King entitled "Bread at Night." Dr. King begins with a parable that demonstrates not only the power of prayer, but provides metaphors for the state of America and thinking material for the role of the church during that time period.

Call to Action in Race Relations

J. Oscar Lee and S. Garry Oniki draft a memorandum to outline the purpose, function and program emphases for the General Committee for the Department of Racial and Cultural Relations sponsored by the National Council of Churches.

Catholic Interracial Council Newsletter Honoring MLK

This 1965 newsletter from the Catholic Interracial Council honors Dr. King with the Pacem in Terris Peace and Freedom Award.

Pages