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Civil rights

Associated Archive Content : 418 results

Letter from MLK to Congressman Charles C. Diggs, Jr.

Dr. King responds to the concerns of Congressman Charles Diggs regarding the March on Washington. He encloses a privately distributed memorandum about the march that Dr. King believes will answer the questions Congressman Diggs has about the march. Dr. King also briefly explains the purpose and some logistics of the march.

Letter from MLK to Dwight Campbelll

Dr. King declines an invitation from the Methodist Youth Fellowship to speak in Philadelphia.

Letter from MLK to Edwin D. Hoffman

Dr. King informs Dr. Edwin Hoffman of his inability to speak at the American Forum in West Virginia. Dr. King states that he will be focusing more attention to the Civil Rights and may not be available to speak at many events due to his limited schedule.

Letter from MLK to Emily C. Greco

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for a gift given to the SCLC on behalf of The Winsor School, Boston, Massachusetts.

Letter from MLK to Former Supporters

Dr. King addresses former supporters concerning his controversial stance on Vietnam. He examines the country's colonial history and struggle for independence as contributing factors to America's current military presence in Vietnam. The civil rights leader defends his commitment to nonviolence as an "exceptional moral responsibility" that must transcend international borders.

Letter from MLK to Gilbert J. Clark

Dr. King informs Gilbert J. Clark, Chairman at the Law School Forum, that he is unable to speak in Edmonton under the auspices of the Alberta Law School Forum during his trip to Canada.

Letter from MLK to John Evarts

The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, a specialized agency of the United Nations, contributes to peace and security by promoting international collaboration through education, science, and culture in order to further universal respect for justice, the rule of law, human rights, and fundamental freedoms proclaimed in the UN Charter. Dr. King thanks his contact in France after a successful joint fundraising event.

Letter from MLK to Johnnie McKinney

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak in Cheyenne, Wyoming "under the auspices of the NAACP."

Letter from MLK to Jonathan B. Bingham

Dr. King responds to Congressman Bingham's request for information concerning SCLC's position on foreign policy matters and donor contributions. Dr. King informs the congressman that the organization decided at a recent convention to "have SCLC abstain from foreign policy matters," in order to preserve its civil rights objectives and donor's trust. However, Dr. King states that SCLC permits individual employees to assume whatever position they choose regarding foreign policy matters, and contributes his public statements concerning Vietnam to this privilege.

Letter from MLK to Keith Black

Dr. King thanks Keith Black and the Valley Community Presbyterian Church for their contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, stating the progress and upcoming goals of the organization.

Letter from MLK to Lavera Davis

Dr. King declines an invitation from the Fifty-Ninth Street Baptist Church to speak at an upcoming Civil Rights Day event.

Letter from MLK to Melvin W. Trent

Dr. King recommends that Melvin W. Trent file a complaint with the Civil Rights Commission about the unjust labor situation in Newport News.

Letter from MLK to Moreland Griffith Smith, Sr.

Dr. King thanks Moreland Griffith Smith, Chairman of the Alabama Advisory Committee to the US Commission Civil Rights, in advance for advising him at the upcoming meeting. Dr. King states that he is sending Reverend Andrew Young to represent the SCLC.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Eugene Sands

Dr. King writes Mrs. Eugene Sands to thank her for her financial contribution to the SCLC.

Letter from MLK to Paralee Fields

Dr. King writes Paralee Fields to decline an invitation to speak at the commencement for Phenix High School. Dr. King explains that he is very busy with the Civil Rights Movement and has limited time for speaking engagements.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Curtis Barge

In this letter addressed to Rev. Barge and Friends, of the Northern Illinois Ministerial Association. Dr. King expresses his gratitude for a contribution to the SCLC. Dr. King explains the current endeavors of the organization and conveys the importance of their contribution.

Letter from MLK to Rev. E. Wayne Roberts

Dr. King writes Rev. E. Wayne Roberts in support of his fellow friend and SCLC Co-Founder Rev. C. K. Steele, Jr. He notes Rev. Steele as "a thorough and competent pastor" that exemplifies the teachings of Jesus Christ.

Letter from MLK to Rev. H. Edward Whitaker

Dr. King responds to a letter from Rev. Edward Whitaker, regarding Whitaker's desire to be a college minster. He expresses to Whitaker that his experience should serve him well for such a responsibility. Dr. King and Rev. Whitaker were classmates at Crozer Theological Seminary.

Letter from MLK to Richard Huett

Dr. King informs Richard Huett, Editor of Laurel Editions and Delta Books, that he cannot write a book for Huett due to other writing responsibilities and time commitments.

Letter from MLK to Robert F. Kennedy

Dr. King informs Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy that if the proposed Civil Rights Bill of 1964 is "weakened at any point" that civil disobedience will follow and it will be the fault of those that "watered down the bill."

Letter from MLK to Ruby Brown

Dr. King writes Ruby Brown of Detroit, Michigan to thank her for her letter regarding the civil rights struggle.

Letter from MLK to Senator Daniel Brewster

Dr. King commends Senator Daniel Brewster for his support of the 1964 Civil Rights Act.

Letter from MLK to Senator Phillip A. Hart

Dr. King writes Senator Phillip A. Hart expressing gratitude for his support in passing the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from MLK to The Honorable E.L. Bartlett

Dr. King writes Alaskan Congressman Edward Lewis Bartlett to express appreciation for his vote in support of passing the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from MLK to Tore Lundby

Dr. King informs Mr. Lundby, Editor, he is unable to contribute an article to BLAESUVOLDEINS EFTERRETNINGSTIDENDE.

Letter from MLK to Verna L. Halll

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Hall and the rest of the Mississippi Club for their donation. He assures her that "good will contributions" are necessary for the work of the SCLC to continue.

Letter from MLK to Vice President Nixon

Dr. King thanks Vice President Richard Nixon for an earlier meeting. He supports the limited Civil Rights Bill (the Civil Rights Act of 1957) finally passed by the Senate and hopes the President will not veto it. He believes that a sustained mass movement is needed for the bill to be effective and is calling for a “Crusade for Citizenship” in the South to get at least 2 million Negroes registered to vote for the 1960 elections. King lauds the Vice President for his vigorous efforts in support of the Civil Rights Bill.

Letter from MLK to William Proxmire

Dr. King thanks William Proxmire for his support in passing the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Moreland Griffith Smith to MLK

Moreland Griffith Smith, Chairman of the Alabama Advisory Committee, invites Dr. King or a representative to an open meeting which will be held in Alabama. The purpose of the meeting is to gather information regarding equal protection under the law in areas such as housing, voting, and employment.

Letter from Mrs. David Bowen to MLK

Mrs. David Bowen suggests that SCLC start a poor people's campaign. She says that they should focus on a specific group of people instead if just problems in general. She also says that she and others will be willing to help when they know how to find the people who truly need it.

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