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Associated Archive Content : 152 results

"A Knock At Midnight"

This is a draft of the sermon Dr. King wrote comparing a story from the Bible in St. Luke to the struggle to obtain equality and civil rights.

"Delaware Hears Nixon Fight Bias"

This New York Times article provides details about Vice President Richard Nixon's decision to support the end of school segregation.

"Leaders of 'Socialist Scholars' Talk Guerrilla War in Cities Next Year"

Alice Widener argues that the Black Power movement will result in domestic guerilla warfare. The writer's stance originates from a Black Power workshop she attended. Widener argues that the U.S. government must "round up and imprison" the "Red-Black power criminals."

"Outrage in Alabama"

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference reprinted the article, "Outrage in Alabama," which was originally printed in The New York Times. The article describes violent acts against civil rights demonstrators discussing the flaws within the legal system.

"They are Waiting for Godot in Mississippi, Too"

This article, posted in the New York Times, discusses the play, "Waiting for Godot," held by the Free Southern Theatre in Mississippi. The play focuses on racial and social issues dealing with civil rights.

A Country Called Corporate America

New York Times Magazine writer Andrew Hacker writes about the growing problems caused by the "bigness" of corporate America. He says that large corporations are beginning to have so much power that they can damage the society without having to account for the consequences, as "corporate wealth buys corporate wishes." Some of the ways that they effect society are through their advertisements, their control of the labor market and education.

American Education: Segregation, Northern Style

This article from American Education focuses on the problem of de facto segregation in Northern and Southern cities that results from discrimination in housing and contributes to further housing discrimination and minority unemployment. De facto segregation is as detrimental as legalized (de jure) segregation. The author provides an overview of efforts around the country to eliminate segregation in public schools and some of the difficulties encountered.

Anonymous Letter to John B. Oakes

This letter to the Editorial Page Editor of "The New York Times" features an unidentified writer presenting a rebuttal to a previous article on violence and "young Negroes." The writer identifies himself as a "dark-skin, non white" and cites examples of racial violence in other areas of the world.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

This letter, signed "A Malaysian Citizen," expresses the author's hatred of African Americans. In addition to urging for their genocide, the author states that African Americans ought to be grateful that they are no longer enslaved. The author tasks the recipients of this letter, including Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, and President Johnson, to circulate it widely in order to express what he claims are the Malaysian views of the 20th century.

Background Paper on the Student Sit-in Protest Movement

The Division of Racial Minorities and the Division of Christian Citizenship of the National Council of the Protestant Episcopal Church give some background information on the "sit-in protest movement" and list three points in summary.

Brief for the Petitioners

This brochure illustrates questions as well as events pertaining to petitioners during the Civil Rights Movement. Important petitioners, such as Dr. King and Ralph David Abernathy, were convicted and charged with Contempt of Court in violation of the First and Fourteenth Amendment of the United States Constitution.

Call to Survival

This advertisement offers a "realistic appraisal" of the Vietnam situation and offers possible solutions.

Check from New York Times Company to MLK

The New York Times company presents Dr. King with a $400 check for his article on civil rights.

Christianity and Crisis: April 3, 1967

Roger L. Shinn wrote this article for Christianity and Crisis: A Christian Journal of Opinion. Shinn defines a "conscientious objector" as one who believes a war morally unjustifiable, and chooses, therefore, not to serve in it. Several Christian organizations attempted to introduce legislation banning forced participation. The American Civil Liberties Union has encouraged the selective service system to recognize a policy "under which no person shall be compelled to participate in armed conflict when he believes it to be in violation of his conscience."

Current Magazine

This Current Magazine issue on racism in the U.S. features an article "Is Direct Action Necessary" by Dr. King, as well as pieces by James Meredith, James Reston, and others.

Darien Seeking Negro Teachers

This article discusses the teacher exchange program between New York City Public Schools and Darien, Connecticut. The program calls for African American teachers to teach students in the predominately white town. The superintendent states the purpose of the project is to show the students that African Americans, if given the same opportunity, are just as intelligent as their white counterparts.

Does MLK Have the Right? the Qualifications? the Duty? to Speak Out on Peace

SCLC National Executive Director Andrew Young addresses recent articles criticizing Dr. King's expressions on peace. Young argues that these attacks are largely based on misconceptions of Dr. King's views. He states that the media is quick to attack Dr. King, but whenever critics retract their statements, nothing is reported. To combat this, Young includes a sampling of accurate articles on Dr. King to "redress the imbalance."

Draft: The Time for Freedom Has Come

In this draft of Dr. King's article, "The Time for Freedom Has Come," he discusses the role of African American students in the Civil Rights Movement. He praises the commitment and determination of students and credits them with the desegregation of lunch counters. He also identifies with the students' frustration with the slowness of forward progress in the struggle for equality. The article was published in New York Times Magazine on September 10, 1961.

Educational Conference Program 1967

Dr. King serves as a guest speaker at a conference sponsored by The Allied Educational Foundation. This program outlines the itinerary for the event including the presentations of other speakers namely Max Lerner, Harrison E. Salisbury, Senator Gale W. McGee, and Stanley Levey.

Face the Nation Interview

This is a transcript of an August 1965 interview of Dr. King on the CBS television news program Face the Nation. King is asked to comment on numerous issues facing American society including the conflict in Vietnam, civil rights, housing and birth control.

Five Denominations of Protestants Said To Ignore Negroes

This article discusses a claim brought against "five influential Protestant denominations" by members of the Rockefeller Fund for Theological Education. Specifically referenced is Rev. Dr. C. Shelby Rooks, Executive secretary of the fund, who is reported as saying that the American Baptist Convention, the Episcopal, the Methodist, the United Presbyterian Churches, and the United Church of Christ discriminated against African Americans "from the centers of denominational power and decision making." Dr.

Food & Allied World Crises: Is There A Solution?

This document is a composition of several articles addressing the global state of food consumption and production.

He Was a Moment in the Conscience of Man

This article discusses the importance of preserving Dr. King's teachings and legacy.

How Do You View Progress in School Desegregation?

In this rough draft of an article written by Gene Roberts of the New York Times, Roberts expresses his optimistic and realistic views of the progress being made in integrating schools.

How Do You View the Progress in School Desegregation?

In this special for the New York Times, Dr. King shares his opinion on the progress made in desegregating schools.

I've Been to the Mountaintop

Dr. King gave this address at the Mason Temple in Memphis, Tennessee the night before he was assassinated. He called for nonviolent protest and a boycott of Memphis area businesses in support of the Memphis Sanitation Workers strike. Conveying a sense of foreboding, he not only recounted a near-death experience when he was stabbed near the heart, but also spoke of the possibility of his own demise at the hands of those who opposed him.

I've Been To The Mountaintop

"I've Been to the Mountaintop" is the last speech Dr. King delivered. A day after making this address at the Masonic Temple in Memphis, Tennessee, he was assassinated on the balcony of his hotel room. Dr. King spoke of faith, nonviolent protest and his support of the Memphis Sanitation Workers Strike. He urged both a march and a boycott against Memphis area businesses. Dr. King ended his speech by musing about his previous brush with death and other threats against him.

Importance of Negro History and Independence

Dr. King speaks to society's misunderstanding of Negro thought and the resulting tensions in race relations. He attributes this misunderstanding to the lack of Negro history authentically represented in books. Contrived myths created by "omission and commission in books" have reinforced prejudice and faulty sense of white supremacy. He observes that illusions cloud reality and render hostility. Society's unresolved problems are aggravated by racial misconceptions.

In a Word- Now

This is a draft of the article "In a Word-Now" written by Dr. King. It was published in the New York Times on September 29, 1963.

Interview of MLK to Appear in PLAYBOY

On behalf of Dr. King, Secretary Dora McDonald responds to Thomas A. Johnson of The New York Times. She goes on to say that Dr. King accepts the invitation for an interview, that would appear in an upcoming issue of PLAYBOY Magazine.

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