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Communism

Associated Archive Content : 267 results

"A Knock At Midnight"

This is a draft of the sermon Dr. King wrote comparing a story from the Bible in St. Luke to the struggle to obtain equality and civil rights.

"Barnett Says JFK Aids Reds"

In a testimony before the Senate Commerce Committee, Mississippi Governor Ross R. Barnett expresses his staunch opposition to President Kennedy's recent civil rights legislation. Governor Barnett goes as far as to associate recent Communist Party activities to the recent "racial agitation, strife, and conflict" emerging from the Civil Rights Movement.

"Leaders of 'Socialist Scholars' Talk Guerrilla War in Cities Next Year"

Alice Widener argues that the Black Power movement will result in domestic guerilla warfare. The writer's stance originates from a Black Power workshop she attended. Widener argues that the U.S. government must "round up and imprison" the "Red-Black power criminals."

"Mrs. Julia Brown To Speak Here On Martin Luther King"

This article discusses former FBI undercover agent, Julia Brown's plan to expose Dr. King of his affiliation with the Communist party.

"The Negro's Road to Equality" by Roscoe Drummond

This article reports on the historic decision of the United States Supreme Court to end segregation in 1954. Outlining a brief narrative of segregation in America, the writer makes it clear that the decision was imperative and timely.

1965 Pacem In Terris Peace and Freedom Award

This program details the events surrounding the Davenport Catholic Interracial Council's 1965 Pacem In Terris Peace and Freedom Award. Dr. King received the award that year for exemplifying principles of peace and freedom.

A Big Johnny Reb Special Editorial

The Big Johnny Reb Radio Show, a show syndicated throughout the State of Georgia, criticizes Dr. King for his position on the Vietnam War. The management of the radio station agrees with the view that too much American blood has been spilled, but they also state Dr. King should not denounce his own country's cause in the fight against Communism.

A Christmas Sermon

Dr. King discusses the topics of peace, the state of mankind, and his vision for the future during the delivery of this sermon to the congregation of Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia.

A Historian Looks at Our Political Morality

Liberal historian Henry Steele Commager writes on the political morality of the United States. He asserts that the United States is not above the historical tendency to become corrupt, and the issue will become more important as the United States grows more powerful. He argues that the United States must reconcile the "principles of law and of morality."

A Journey of Conscience

In this draft of his 1967 speech, "A Journey of Conscience," Dr. King provides the many reasons he so strongly opposes the war in Vietnam. He writes of how he first felt it was important to remain silent, but gradually felt compelled to speak out, as the US made no initiatives toward peace. He points at that the war abroad takes away our focus on our problems at home, and we must "combine the fervor of the civil rights movement with the peace movement."

A Statement to the South and Nation

This seemingly unexceptional document signifies the birth of the SCLC. Dr. King, Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth and Rev. C. K. Steele assembled a consortium of leaders in Atlanta following the end of the Montgomery Bus Boycott. The Southern Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration issued this statement that addresses the intimidation, discrimination and economic disparity Negroes face in the South. The statement appeals to the federal government to intervene against assaults that block basic civil rights.

A Statement to the South and Nation

The Southern Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration issued this statement. The document states that a world-wide campaign for social and political freedom shows an international plight for human dignity. As America is one of the two most powerful nations in the world, "the unresolved problem of civil rights becomes the most crucial issue." There is contradiction between the freedom America proclaims and the actual practice of civil liberties and democracy. Dr.

A Tribute to the Organized Labor Movement

The Jewish Labor Committee extends heartfelt gratitude to the American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO) for twenty-five years of fraternal cooperation.

Address by Dabbs entitled 'Quit You Like Men' Delivered at SCLC

This address to the Fall Session of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference was delivered in October, 1959, by James McBride Dabbs. Dabbs speaks to the social condition in the United States, highlighting the equality of the races. Arguing that justice is a two way street, Dabbs brings up Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom," in which Dr. King defends the Montgomery bus boycott as an essential non-cooperation to show discontent.

Address by MLK to the National Press Club

During an address to the National Press Club in Washington, Dr. King declares the time for racial justice has arrived.

Address Given by Vice President Nixon in Asheville, North Carolina

This is the text of an address given by Vice President Richard Nixon before the sixty-sixth annual convention of the General Federation of Women's Club. He discusses the differences in countries dealing with Communism and America being a democracy.

Address Given by Vice President Nixon in Chicago, Illinois

This document contains the text of an address given by Vice President Richard Nixon at the Joint Defense Appeal of the American Jewish Committee and the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith. He expresses what can be done and what laws should be passed to make sure others are not further abused.

Adverse Message from Dr. Douglas of Sarasota, FL

This message from Dr. Douglas was given over the telephone #525-1717 in Springfield, Illinois. Douglas discusses his beliefs on racism and communism in regards to Dr. King. He discusses how communist are the followers of Dr. King, and also how the Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to King in order to cause a "communist world revolution." Bayard Rustin is described by Douglas as a "pervert, jail bird" close associate of Dr. King.

Adverse Postcard to MLK

American Opinion illustrates a propaganda postcard of Dr. King that accuses him of being a communist. The photo on the postcard was taken at the Highlander School in 1957 which trained leaders in nonviolent passive resistance.

America's Chief Moral Dilemma

Dr. King's address to the Hungry Club highlights an array of issues that relate to America's "Moral Dilemma." Dr. King explains the three major evil dilemmas that face the nation: war, poverty, and racism.

Amsterdam News Article by MLK About European Tour

Dr. King recalls an address he gave at the Berlin Arts Festival, where he witnessed an enthusiastic crowd. The crowd's interest confirmed his belief "that the Negro is now in a position to lead the world." He also mentions the Christians of East Berlin, who, though Communists, maintain their faith in God.

An Address by MLK at the 53rd Convention of the NAACP

Dr. King makes an address at the 53rd Convention of the National Association for the Advancement of Color People in Atlanta disputing the myths of the civil rights movement. In addition to expressing appreciation for the organization's work, Dr. King apologizes for the prejudice the NAACP had to endure in making accommodations for the conference in Atlanta.

Anonymous Criticism of MLK's Stance on Vietnam

This anonymous letter writer feels that Dr. King's active stance against the Vietnam war takes away from his fight for civil rights. He includes a newspaper article that encapsulates Dr. King's views on the subject, and lists the reasons he feels that Dr. King is being unpatriotic.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Dr. King received this letter from an individual who urges that both poverty and the Vietnam War should be ended by helping Americans and building up communities, and then sending peaceful volunteers to South Vietnam to do the same. The author, who has several family members in the service, chooses not to sign their name, fearing retribution, and states that they wish to broadcast this message around the world.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

The anonymous author details some of the hardships of his life and expresses his desire to incarcerate Dr. King permanently.

Anonymous Letter to Paul Abernathy

The anonymous author of this letter addresses a "Paul" Abernathy to speak against the March of the Poor People's Campaign after Dr. King's death. The author makes statements suggesting that the efforts on behalf of Abernathy are forced upon the government through such demonstrations.

Anonymous Postcard to MLK

Postcard has a photo entitled "Training Schools for Communists". American Opinion claims the photo was taken at the Highlander Folk School over Labor Day weekend 1957. Dr. King is depicted as one the attendees. Postcard was stamped with an Abraham Lincoln postage stamp (One of the guiding forces to Dr. King and his efforts)

Anonymous Sender Criticizes MLK

This anonymous writer challenges Dr. King with his complaints concerning the Civil Rights Movement. He argues that a Negro man should be held responsible for breaking the law and should expect rightful punishment.

Answers in the American Way

This text derives from a television show outlining the facts of the Black Panther Party. In attendance were civil rights activist like Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, H. Rapp Brown and their affiliates within the Civil Rights Movement.

Anti-Poverty Expenditures that Cheat Federal Taxpayers and the Poor

Harry G. and Elizabeth R. Brown express their concerns about housing in America. They claim that while open housing will help Negroes who can afford it, those who cannot will continue to live in slums. They pose the idea of reforming the tax policy as a solution to this problem.

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