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Communism

Associated Archive Content : 267 results

Anticommunist Flyer

This flyer suggests that the U.N. consists of communists Jews. Several contacts are provided for Americans to receive support and be educated about Communism.

Article regarding MLK

This article highlights Dr. Kings affiliation with the "New Left" Conference held in Chicago, Illinois.

Beyond Vietnam

In Dr. Kings Beyond Vietnam address, he discusses seven major reasons for bringing Vietnam into "a field of moral vision," five things that the government should do to remove itself from conflict with Vietnam, the National Liberation Front of South Vietnam, and Premier Diem. Dr. King also encourages those in the churches and the synagogues to speak out against the war in Vietnam.

Black Out: Dress Rehearsal for the Revolution

Kenneth Goff warns about the potential race riots predicted in a Communist manual.

Black Power and Liberation: A Communist View

Arnold Johnson, Public Relations Director of Communist Party U. S. A, requests commentary on Claude Lightfoot's pamphlet "A Note on Black Power and Liberation." The pamphlet has sparked discussions in the public press and the Negro Freedom Movement.

Board of Christian Social Concerns of the Methodist Church Concerns on Vietnam

The Board of Christian Social Concerns are troubled by the events transpiring in Vietnam. They believe that such violence cannot be God's will and offer their solutions on how to end the war. They also applaud Dr. King for his views and words concerning the war.

Brotherhood Cannot Be a Theory

This newspaper clipping of The Southern Israelite features segments on the Atlanta banquet honoring Dr. King's acceptance of the Nobel Peace Prize. Given on his return to the States, there were twelve hundred and fifty Atlanta citizens in attendance. Included articles are: welcoming comments by Rabbi Jacob Rothschild, a tribute by Archbishop Paul Hallinan, and a transcription of Dr. King's speech.

Cape Times: Dr. Luther King in Bad Company

In this Cape Times article, author J. M. Gray poses six questions to Dr. King regarding recent sightings with Communist Party members.

Cape Times: No Reply to Luther King Invitation

L. Marquard writes an article discussing the discontent that Dr. J. D. Vorster and Rev. J. A. Heynes had regarding Dr. King's honorary degree from the Vrye Universiteit of Amsterdam.

CBS's Face the Nation Interview

This is an official transcript of an interview on CBS's Face the Nation that focused on the Vietnam War. Dr. King explains his vision for the Civil Rights Movement and Antiwar Movements. The Great Society, Dr. King believes, is being shot down over Vietnam, as the funding for the programs are diverted to the war.

Challenge on Luther King

The author of this article says that Rev. I. L. de Villiers' letter lacked moderation, reasoned argument and tolerance of a different point of view. He also says that anyone who advocates for racial equality is branded as communist and that Afrikaners are suffering as a result.

Communism

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Engles as he clarifies that Karl "Marx was not an economic determinist as many have thought." The economic situation and superstructure of society are noted as key elements.

Communism

Dr. King quotes a statement from Jacques Maritain's "True Harmonism" regarding communism. Jacques Maritain was a famous French Catholic philosopher.

Current Magazine

This Current Magazine issue on racism in the U.S. features an article "Is Direct Action Necessary" by Dr. King, as well as pieces by James Meredith, James Reston, and others.

Does MLK Have the Right? the Qualifications? the Duty? to Speak Out on Peace

SCLC National Executive Director Andrew Young addresses recent articles criticizing Dr. King's expressions on peace. Young argues that these attacks are largely based on misconceptions of Dr. King's views. He states that the media is quick to attack Dr. King, but whenever critics retract their statements, nothing is reported. To combat this, Young includes a sampling of accurate articles on Dr. King to "redress the imbalance."

Don B. Pratt's Position Statement

Don Pratt expresses concerns about his induction into the US Army during the Vietnam War. Mr. Pratt questions the morality of this "aggressive" war, which would enable him to inflict violence against his "neighbors" of Vietnam.

Dr. Luther King Cause of U.S. Violence

The articles mentions Dr. King and his supposed involvement with the Communist Party. The author is not convinced that Dr. King is the "good Samaritan" everyone believes him to be, and he is ensuring more violence with his cause.

Draft of Speech to the National Press Club

Dr. King's speech to the National Press Club in Washington D.C. was delivered a week after he was incarcerated in Albany, Georgia. This draft shows Dr. King's notes on his address about the Civil Rights Movement.

Draft Statement of Reverend Dr. MLK Jr.

This statement, not written in Dr. King's hand, responds to Joseph Alsop's syndicated column in the New York Herald Tribune. Dr. King clarifies that SCLC has no affiliation with the Communist Party. He also states the SCLC has not continued a relationship with Jack O'Dell since he was relieved of his responsibilities.

Draft: The Time for Freedom Has Come

In this draft of Dr. King's article, "The Time for Freedom Has Come," he discusses the role of African American students in the Civil Rights Movement. He praises the commitment and determination of students and credits them with the desegregation of lunch counters. He also identifies with the students' frustration with the slowness of forward progress in the struggle for equality. The article was published in New York Times Magazine on September 10, 1961.

Esquire Magazine: The Red Chinese American Negro

This segment of Esquire Magazine features an article discussing the militant activities of Robert F. Williams. Williams had returned home from military service and headed the Monroe, North Carolina branch of the NAACP. Frustrated by the inactivity of local legislation to reform segregation and aggravated by Klu Klux Klan attacks, Williams adopted more violent methodologies. The article also emphasizes his association with Chinese leader Mao Tse-tung and discusses Tse-tung's solidarity with racial goodwill policies.

Essay - MLK Entitled "The Bravest Man I Ever Met"

Dr. King's essay, entitled "The Bravest Man I Ever Met," profiles Norman Thomas, a prominent Socialist.

Excerpts from Remarks of The Vice President

Vice President Richard M. Nixon speaks about the Eisenhower Administration’s support of Negroes in the fight to remove discrimination in employment.

Fact Sheet on the Raid of the SCEF

This document highlights the raid on the New Orleans headquarters of the Southern Conference Educational Fund by State and City Police.

Food & Allied World Crises: Is There A Solution?

This document is a composition of several articles addressing the global state of food consumption and production.

Founders Day Address

Dr. King addresses Spelman College at their Founders Day celebration. He discusses issues such as the Promised Land and the function of education.

Harry Belafonte - American Committee on Africa

Harry Belafonte sends a request for support in South Africa bringing awareness to apartheid and the injustices it entails. Belafonte implores the reader to send immediate help to the country in financial contributions, as an effort to fight racism and government corruption.

Herbert Hill Statement Before the House Committee on Education and Labor

Herbert Hill, National Labor Director for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, addresses the House Committee on Education and Labor regarding the questionable practices conducted by the leadership of the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union.

House Un-American Activities Committee

This article summarizes the consequences that derive from the House Un-American Activities Committee labeling Civil Rights leaders as communists.

Hungry Club Speech

This document is a draft copy of Dr. King's Hungry Club Speech, in which he speaks on the subject "America's Chief Moral Dilemma." He states that the dilemma is "the means by which we live have out distanced the ends for which we live." Dr. King thoroughly discusses the three major evils that contribute to this dilemma: the evil of racism, the evil poverty, and the evil of war. He also discusses the progress of the Civil Rights Movement as it enters a new phase of fighting for "genuine equality."

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