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Communism

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Index Card Containing MLK's Handwriting on the Concept of "Man"

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines J.C. Bennett's views on 'Man' according to his book, "Christianity & Communism." Some material from these reference notes would later emerge in his speeches, sermons, and writings.

Insight Broward: Bullets, Backflips & Baby-Talk

Moreland Smith forwarded a copy of Insight Broward Magazine for Dr. King to view. In this collection of articles, Jim Corvell expresses his disapproval of Alcee Hastings, a local NAACP lawyer, who was a candidate for the House of Representatives. Coryell heatedly describes his efforts to thwart what he called "the [N]egro racist's political plans.

Is It Wrong to Segregate?

This Sermon titled "Is It Wrong to Segregate?" was delivered by the Reverend A. L. Kendrick on June 5, 1960. He expounds on several topics including equal rights, communism and the political element of the government.

John Coleman Bennett

John Coleman Bennett's work is used to flesh out an outline on the issues that plague society. The issues are broken up into five sections: the fact of evil, four problems of social gospel, economic, state and the church, and Communism. Bennett was a Christian theologian, author, and president of the Union Theological Seminary in New York.

Joint Statement of MLK and SCLC

Dr. King and John Lewis deliver a statement concerning a meeting presided over by Harry Belafonte. The meeting was intended to discover ways that the SCLC and SNCC could cooperate and concluded with an agreement for both organizations to work together but separately towards a voting bill and other goals.

King's Way Hurts Rights Movement

Mr. White, author of this article, argues that the political fallout from Dr. King's stance on America's involvement in Vietnam hinders the goals of the Civil Rights Movement.

Lawyer Ejected By House Inquiry; Seven Walk Out

New York lawyer Arthur Kinoy was ejected from the hearing room of the House Committee on Un-American Activities in Washington following a heated legal argument. Seven other lawyers withdrew from the proceedings following Mr. Kinoy's ejection.

Lenin

The role of State in Society is described as Dr. King documents a quote from the book "The State and Revolution" written by Vladimir Lenin.

Let's Be Human

Long time civil rights agitator Harry Fleischman wrote this syndicated column for the American Jewish Committee's National Labor Service. Articles within the column took a humorous and often irreverent view of social and civil rights issues around the globe. Fleischman was also the national secretary of the Socialist Party USA from 1942-50.

Letter Dated 10/15/62 from D. McDonald to Mel Arnold

Miss. Dora McDonald, at the request of Dr. King, sent a letter to Mr. Mel Arnold acknowledging the enclosure of a sermon by Dr. King. The sermon was entitled, "How Should a Christian View Communism?"

Letter from "A Red Blooded American Who Is Opposed to Your Tactics of Un-Americanism"

This letter to Dr. King criticizes his presumed anti-American activities. The author, who signs as "A Red Blooded American who is opposed to your tactics of un-Americanism," describes herself as the mother and grandmother of men who have served in the armed forces.

Letter from a Fellow American to MLK

This anonymous author expresses his concern regarding SNCC; explaining that the organization and its leaders have a communist backing. The author closes the letter with references to jobs, education, and a list of several small countries in need of assistance.

Letter from a Lithuanian American to MLK

In this letter to Dr. King, a Lithuanian immigrant to the United States writes that he agrees with the campaign for Negro rights and believes that all U.S. citizens should be treated equally.

Letter from A.C. Spectorsky to MLK

Editorial Director, A.C. Spectorsky, requests comments from Dr. King regarding an interview with Senator Charles Percy from the April issue of PLAYBOY Magazine. The Illinois Republican
discusses a range of subjects including American military presence in Vietnam, President Lyndon B. Johnson's leadership style, and Negro-white relations.

Letter from Abram Eisenman to MLK

This was sent to Dr. King from Abram Eisenman, who is running for President of the United States in 1968. He asks for Dr. King's support in running for president and presents his case on why he should be president.

Letter from Al Hearin to MLK about Public Appearance

In this letter Al Hearin expresses his admiration for Dr. King and his character, but also expresses his concerns that he, Dr. King, is possibly being used by communist elements in society. Hearin also requests that Dr. King write him a handwritten letter about a life changing experience. Furthermore, Hearin requests an autographed picture.

Letter from Alfred Gunn to MLK

Alfred L. Gunn requests Dr King's support of Gunn's "new Democratic way of Philosophy." Mr. Dunn also encloses three manuscripts pertaining to riots, the American gun and rifle laws, and the occurrence of racial problems in America.

Letter from Angie Elizabeth Shelton to MLK

Mrs. Shelton expresses her gratitude to Dr. King for renewing her faith. After reading one of Dr. King's books, she states that she felt herself beginning to believe. Mrs. Shelton has decided to buy and study "Civil Disobedience" thanks to Dr. King.

Letter from Anonymous Writer to MLK

The author of this letter copies an article "Communists Meet the Church," published by the San Francisco Examiner and Chronicle, to support his accusations of cooperation between the Catholic Church and Communists.

Letter from Archie Crouch to MLK

Archie R. Crouch, of the Office for Communications, sends a personal letter to Dr. King using the United Presbyterian Church letterhead. He expresses his support for Dr. King's leadership against the Vietnam War and states that he meets many people that stand in opposition to the war. Crouch encloses recent issues of the publications New and Motive, which highlight the anti-war efforts taking place in the Presbyterian Church.

Letter from Asbury Howard to MLK

Asbury Howard, Vice President of the International Union of Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, informs Dr. King of the harassment and attacks their union has endured for several years. He explains the 1949 indictment of officers from the union on charges of "falsely signing non-Communist affidavits." The case was dormant until government brought the case to trial in 1959 during a strike of 40,000 allied worker and copper miners. Howard cites this as evidence of union busting. He requests Dr. King's commentary and encloses a pamphlet regarding the case.

Letter from Audrey Mizer to MLK

Audrey Mizer encourages Dr. King to continue his good works because "the world cannot be robbed of any good." Mizer then discusses her opposing views to a statement in a Christian Monitor Column regarding Red China's admission to the United Nations.

Letter from Bea Subt to MLK

The author sends Dr. King a letter informing him that she is withdrawing her assistance toward civil rights workers since he has decided to be a politician, military leader and diplomat. She also questions how he can fight for equal rights in a country that's not worth protecting from the communists.

Letter from Beatrice Rossell to MLK

Beatrice Rossell wrote this letter to Dr. King on Independence Day in 1964, commending him on the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and enclosing a donation. She ends her note, saying "God bless you, your fine family, and the future of your great work."

Letter from Beatrice Sutton Rogers to MLK

Beatrice Rogers writes Dr. King expressing her disappointment with his change in his position after he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. She encloses an article from the Washington Post in which critics discuss a speech King gave regarding Vietnam War.

Letter from Ben Carper to MLK

Ben Carper expresses his opinion in regards to Dr. King's position on Communism. Mr. Carper states that Dr. King is, "playing hand in glove with Godless Communists."

Letter from Benjamin F. Smith to the Editor of Detroit Free Press

In a letter to the editor of the Detroit Free Press, Benjamin Smith criticizes US involvement in Vietnam. He advocates ending the war as 80% of South Vietnamese people want peace, while 67% of Americans "favor a rough war."

Letter from Bernard Hollowood to MLK about Writing an Article

"Punch" editor Bernard Hollowood asks Dr. King to write an article focusing on the following question: "Is America capable of solving its own race problems?" The article would be part of a series of articles focusing on whether the United States can be trusted as leader of the Western World.

Letter from Charles E. Rogers to MLK

Charles Rogers writes Dr. King expressing his grief because of King's recent "allegiance to the communist cause in Southeast Asia." Rogers states that because of Dr. King's speech, his fame will face a decline and people will ask, "who is Martin Luther King?"

Letter from Charles E. Waring to Mr. Paul Harvey

Charles Waring presents ways to prevent the spread of communism around the world. He also questions previous decisions by the United States government and speculates how the outcome would have been different in various conflicts.

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