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Communism

Associated Archive Content : 267 results

Letter from Larry T. Wimmer to MLK

Larry T. Wimmer, Assistant Professor at Brigham Young University, writes Dr. King seeking information regarding his views on communism and the Civil Rights Movement. He also asks if it is possible to obtain any films regarding the Civil Rights Movement and Dr. King's leadership.

Letter from Lawrence Caesar to Andrew Young

Lawrence A. Caesar writes Andrew Young with concerns about charges against Dr. King having appeared in a "Training School for Communists." He states that he simply wants information to refute these charges in order to prevent any negative impact against the movement.

Letter from Lloyd E. Abbey to Mr. Duncan J. Parks about Communism

In this letter Lloyd E. Abbey reacts to an article in the Star-Gazette. Abbey asserts that "Our survival, in relation to the ideology of communism, is very questionable" and "The principle fault... ... the nine old men...," namely Dr. King, Benjamin Spock, William Coffin, Rap Brown, 'Hooligan' [Stokely] Carmichael and others. Abbey connects this to the war in Vietnam.

Letter from Lloyd Wilson to Roy Wilkins

Lloyd Wilson affirms his support for Dr. King, but he cannot agree with Dr. King's recent statements concerning the Vietnam War. He lists a series of questions hoping to gain clarity from Dr. King or Mr. Wilkins.

Letter from Marguerite Munson to MLK

Mrs.Munson writes Dr.King to ask for his assistance in finding a lawyer that is not corrupted by the government.

Letter from Marlys Michels to MLK

Miss Michels informs Dr. King that she will no longer contribute to the SCLC. She disagrees with Dr. King's statements on the Vietnam War, as well as his support of Adam Clayton Powell.

Letter from MLK to a Former Supporter

This is an edited copy of Dr. King's response to someone withdrawing support due to his position on the Vietnam War. King's detailed rewrites show efforts to avoid further misunderstandings about his position. He applies nonviolent philosophies to both the civil rights and peace movements, however, does not attempt to link the two. Rather than asking for Negroes to be exempt from the draft as a special privilege, he believes Negroes have an intimate knowledge of the effects of violence. As such, they should have a special moral obligation not to inflict violence on others.

Letter from MLK to Audrey Mizer

Dr. King addresses Audrey Mizer's concerns regarding his position on "admitting Red China to the United Nations." He explains that he realizes the sensitivity of this topic but feels that the issue must be tackled in a realistic manner.

Letter from MLK to Beatrice Rosselll

Dr. King takes an opportunity to express gratitude for Beatrice Rossell's support to the civil rights movement. He addresses her inquiry regarding his activities with the Highlander Folk School and possible Communist ties. Rossell received a picture of Dr. King at Highlander and the caption addressed him as a Communist.

Letter from MLK to Brown Brothers Harriman and Company about a Contribution

In this letter Dr. King offers his gratitude to the Brown Brothers Harriman and Company for an anonymous contribution of company stock they forwarded. Dr. King also comments on why such contributions are needed.

Letter from MLK to Former Supporters

Dr. King addresses former supporters concerning his controversial stance on Vietnam. He examines the country's colonial history and struggle for independence as contributing factors to America's current military presence in Vietnam. The civil rights leader defends his commitment to nonviolence as an "exceptional moral responsibility" that must transcend international borders.

Letter from MLK to Jack O'Dell

Dr. King requests that Mr. O'Dell makes a statement regarding the philosophy and methods of the SCLC. He explains the urgency of Mr. O'Dell's statement due to an investigation concerning O'Dell's Communist affiliations.

Letter from MLK to Johnie Lee Halle

Dr. King informs Mr. Halle that he has no intention of linking the Civil Rights Movement to the peace movement. He asserts that the Vietnamese have consistently been the victims of colonialism, and argues that war and violence are not acceptable means of resolving conflicts.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Jack H. O'Dell

In response to recent allegations, Dr. King and members of the SCLC Administrative Committee conduct a formal investigation on Mr. O'Dell's reported association with Communist affiliates. Dr. King regrettably informs him that due to this speculation, despite lack of concrete results, he must permanently resign from his position with the SCLC's New York office.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Myles Campbell

Dr. King expresses his thanks to Mrs. Myles Campbell for the kind response to his "I Have A Dream" speech during the March on Washington. He explains that prayer is needed for those who are unable to see past their own prejudices and acknowledge everyone as God's children. Dr. King asserts that the federal government is needed to change behaviors in the south and send Mrs. Campbell season's greetings.

Letter from MLK to Newsweek Editor Joseph Cummings

Dr. King writes Joseph B. Cummings, Jr. in response to a headline article suggesting that Dr. King had advocated that Negroes turn to a new ideology in their struggle – Communism or the Muslim Movement. He wonders how his statement on a television program in Cleveland could be so misinterpreted.

Letter from Mrs. Cyrus Eaton to MLK

In this letter, Mrs. Eaton wrote this letter praising Dr. King for his remarks on Face the Nation. Mrs. Eaton states that Dr. King is indebted to him for always voicing his wisdom.

Letter from Mrs. Glenn Durbin to MLK

Mrs. Glenn Durbin writes to Dr. King expressing her opposing views on Communism.

Letter from Mrs. R.B. Hassell to MLK

Writing from Memphis, Tennessee, Mrs. Hassell expresses her love for America and her concern regarding the cruel treatment many have experienced throughout the world. She offers encouragement to Dr. King and other preachers who are advocates for peace.

Letter from Ms. Katherine Livermore to MLK

Ms. Livermore criticizes Dr. King for his alleged association with the Communist Party. She also makes several historical and contextual references to slavery and the current plight of the Negro race. She concludes with a warning, "be careful this summer."

Letter from P. A. Riley to MLK

A critic writes Dr. King a carefully constructed letter to share her view on his Vietnam War stance. As a widow of a late Korean War veteran, she claims that Dr. King's position undermines "everything that our fighting men, down thru the long, long, years, have fought and died for." The widow questions Dr. King's combination of civil rights and peace movement issues, and asserts "patriotism is one of the factors free men live and prosper under!"

Letter from Peter S. Shults to NAACP

Peter Shults writes the NAACP requesting a comment on a postcard he received that depicts Dr. King as a communist. He asks multiple questions regarding the validity of the picture on the postcard.

Letter from PLAYBOY Magazine to MLK

Playboy Editorial Director A.C. Spectorsky requests comments from Dr. King regarding Kenneth Tynan's article "Open Letter to an American Liberal," which accompanies the letter.

Letter from R. C. Woodard to MLK

R. C Woodard expresses that he is an admirer of Dr. King but wants to inquire about whether he is a member of the Communist Party.

Letter from Richard P. Heath to MLK

Richard P. Heath expresses his distaste for Dr. King's method of attaining equal rights and freedoms. He posits, "In order to have rights and freedoms, we must be responsible for our actions."

Letter from Robert Bondy to MLK

Though a long time supporter of Dr. King, Robert Bondy, criticizes for Dr. King for mixing the issues of civil rights and Vietnam. He argues that speaking out against Vietnam has only further inflamed opponents of the Civil Rights Movement, and Dr. King has thrown back the movment "for a long time to come."

Letter from Robert Gabor to MLK

Robert Gabor writes Dr. King inviting him to Oslo, Norway to speak at the 7th International Congress of the International Union of Socialist Youth. Gabor expresses to Dr. King that their organization supports "the present struggle of the American Negro."

Letter from Robert H. Goldsmith to MLK

Robert Goldsmith sends a contribution and expresses his support of Dr. King's Christian methods to attain full integration and civil rights. He discusses Dr. King's campaign to end the Vietnam War and asserts that the country is engaged in an immoral action in Southeast Asia.

Letter from Robert Pritchard to The Benjamin Franklin Institute

As a result of being investigated by Mr. Aguiliar, a staff member of the Benjamin Franklin Institute, Robert Pritchard, writes the director of the institute expressing his grievances. A carbon copy of this letter was sent to the National Headquaters, SCLC and NAACP.

Letter from Robert Sandberg from MLK

Robert Sandberg criticizes Dr. King for his recent statements on the Vietnam War. Mr. Sandberg states that Dr. King's position has now undermined his effectiveness as a leader in the Civil Rights Movement.

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