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Communism

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MLK Comments on Jack O'Dell's Alleged Communist Ties

Dr. King attempts to correct the erroneous impressions created by various newspapers alleging Jack O'Dell's connection to "Communist" activities. While Dr. King maintains Mr. O'Dell's strong work performance, the Detroit native will relinquish his role "in order to avoid embarrassment to SCLC."

MLK Draft Text Retrieved by T.D. Johnston

The document is a dedication from T. D. Johnston of Huntsville, Alabama to the King Center. Mr. Johnston acknowledges being on an Eastern Airline plane with Dr. King in 1961, where he noticed that Dr. King tossed a speech text that he found. He decided to hold on to the document for preservation and donated it to the King Center. Martin Luther King, III received the document on behalf of the King Center.

MLK on Communist Infiltration

Dr. King responds to an article written by Joseph Alsop and J. Edgar Hoover that charged communism had infiltrated the Civil Rights Movement.

MLK Reflections on the Selma March, Bloody Sunday, SNCC and Communism

Dr. King discusses the Selma to Montgomery march, calling it the "most powerful and dramatic civil rights protest ever held in the south." Dr. King also addresses criticism of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee's tactics. He concludes these notes by responding to claims that he has communist ties, denying any foreign or left-wing influence on his actions. Of Bayard Rustin and C. T.

MLK Sermon: Why I Am Opposed to the War in Vietnam

Dr. King gives a sermon on why he does not support the war in Vietnam.

MLK Speaks on Vietnam War

This 32-page booklet was published by Clergy and Laymen Concerned About Vietnam shortly after Dr. King’s April 4, 1967 Riverside Church address on the Vietnam War. It features a foreword by Dr. Reinhold Niebuhr, Dr. King’s speech, and remarks by Henry Steele Commager, Dr. John C. Bennett, and Rabbi Abraham Heschel. In addition, it includes a New York Times interview with Dr. King, King’s response to NAACP criticism on his opposition to the war, and letters to the editor of the New York Times.

MLK Speech at SCLC Staff Retreat

Dr. King addresses the staff of the SCLC at a retreat in Frogmore, South Carolina. He divides his speech into three parts: "whence we have come, where we have come, and where do we go from here." Dr. King thoroughly discusses his thoughts on Communism, the practice of nonviolence, the belief that racism is an "ontological affirmation,"and the weaknesses of Black Power.

MLK Statement in Support of Labor Union

This 1959 statement on behalf of the United Packing House Workers Union is one of many Dr. King wrote supporting unions and the Labor Movement.

MLK Upon Landing at New York City

Dr. King expresses his enjoyment upon his return from India. He also gives his opinion on a few issues in India such as India's struggling economy. He first advises that Western nations should aid India in improving their economy. Then he compares the caste system to the race problem in America.

MLK's Address About South Africa

Addressing the apartheid situation in South Africa, Dr. King states that white rulers of South Africa, rather than black Africans, are "modern day barbarians." He continues to say that although black South Africans are the majority, they are oppressed by the minority. This is one of many occasions that Dr. King parallels racial injustices and views civil rights as an international issue.

MLK's Response to Vietnam Criticism

This is an early draft of Dr. King's response to those who wrote him letters critical of his stance on Vietnam. He says that it would be hypocritical to protest against black oppression in America, but not against Vietnamese colonization. He also cites the ideology of non-violence as an explanation for his stance, and expresses regret that "much of America has failed to understand the full meaning of the non-violent method."

Negotiation Now New York Times Advertisement

Negotiation Now, a national pro-American group opposing the war in Vietnam, planned to publish this article as an advertisement in the New York Times. Clark Herr, Reverend John J. Dougherty, Dr. Daniel Patrick Moynihan, and Seymour Martin Lipset send this letter, along with an enclosed draft of the piece, explaining that its publishing has been delayed so it can be updated in the ever changing circumstances in Vietnam. The article addresses the concerns of the movement and urges people to call their representatives.

Negro Morality and Why Didnt She Stay Home?

Dr. King's secretary, Dora McDonald, recommends two articles published in The Carolina Israelite. "Negro Morality" makes distinctions between crime committed by impoverished Negroes and their ethically challenged white counterparts. The second article,"Why Didn't She Stay Home?" discusses tactics of the "Far Right," the ignoring of crimes committed against Negroes, and the role of both white and black clergy in the preservation of Christian ideals.

Newspaper Article Concerning Peace in North Vietnam

This document contains two articles from various newspapers. The first article concerns the call of South Vietnamese Roman Catholic Bishops for the end of U.S. aggression towards North Vietnam. The second article concerns a South Vietnamese Roman Catholic woman who has asked the Pope to become a hostage for a day.

Nobel Peace Prize Lecture

This is a handwritten draft of the Nobel lecture. Dr. King delivered this lecture at the University of Oslo on December 11, 1964, the day after receiving the Peace Prize. Aware of the prestigious nature of the award and the global recognition it brought to the nonviolent struggle for racial justice in the US, King worked nearly a month on his address. He goes beyond his dream for America and articulates a vision of a World House in which a family of different races, religions, ideas, cultures and interests must learn to live together as brothers or perish together as fools.

On Being a Good Neighbor

Dr. King tells the Biblical story of the "Good Samaritan on the Road to Jericho," in which a traveler has been robbed, beaten and left for dead. Dr. King connects this story to the Declaration of Independence and offers an analysis of the modern era. Following the example of the "Good Samaritan," he encourages looking beyond "race, religion and nationality" to help those wounded by injustices.

On Being A Good Neighbor

In Dr. King's sermon "On Being A Good Neighbor," he explains variety of stories that aid him in defining a good samaritan as an altruistic human being. He uses the path to Jerusalem and Jericho as a walking path where people must help others to accomplish one goal equality.

Our Struggle

Dr. King drafts this speech entitled "Our Struggle" for the April 1956 publication of Liberation. Dr. King discusses how both whites and blacks have internalized a caste system that perpetuates Negroes as inferior beings. He speculates that racial peace is maintained in the caste system due to harsh discrimination and a loss of faith in the black community. Dr. King states that the shift in race relations, and subsequent tension, occurred when Negroes "began to re-evaluate themselves," finding self-respect and dignity.

Outline Regarding Jacques Maritain

Dr. King outlines in great detail Catholic philosopher Jacques Maritain's views on: communism, democracy, politics, and the relation between church and state.

Paul's Letter to American Christians

This is a sermon chapter and possible draft for Dr. King's book "Strength to Love." Dr. King writes from the perspective of Paul the Apostle. Through the words of King, Paul speaks to modern day American Christians and challenges them to uphold true Christian values. Paul notes the presence of economic, scientific, and technological development, yet questions the contradiction of social injustices in a society that seems so advanced.

Paul's Letter to American Christians

Dr. King writes an imaginary letter to modern day Christians from the perspective of the apostle Paul. In the letter, Paul praises his listeners for their technological advancements, yet reprimands them for their spiritual degradation. He encourages them to uphold Christian values despite outside factors.

Paul's Letter to American Christians

Dr. King shares "Paul's Letter to American Christians" with the congregation of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama. In this contemporary letter revised by Dr. King, Apostle Paul writes concerning the "responsibilities of Americans to live as Christians." He discusses his appreciation for America, the danger of capitalism, communism, segregation in churches, and the many denominations of Protestantism. But above all things, Apostle Paul believes that love is the most "durable power in the world."

Political Cartoon: The FBI Adds

This satirical cartoon in the Nashville Banner equates protests in the U.S. with the Communist buildup in Vietnam.

Post Card from Archie Brest to MLK

A supporter of the Vietnam War expresses his conflicting views regarding the struggle for democracy in Southeast Asia. In order to combat the brutality of North Vietnamese forces, he insists that American military presence will ultimately prove that "terror cannot succeed as a weapon in Vietnam, we shall discourage it's use anywhere."

Post Card from Critic to MLK

This unstamped post card comes from a writer who identifies himself as "Ole Dorky" and targets Dr. King and the American Civil Liberties Union as "Communist skum." The writer disagrees with the work of civil rights and believes that efforts are "making matters worse for negroes."

Post Card from Jerry Smith to MLK

Jerry Smith writes to Dr. King who is in the Birmingham Jail. Smith accuses Dr. King of not being a genuine reverend, but a communist hate monger.

Press Release from the Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc.

The Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc. informs supporters about the recent attacks on civil rights groups located in Knoxville, Tennessee.

Protest Against MLK Flyer

This flyer accuses Dr. King of being a traitor and calls for a protest rally when he appears at Grosse Pointe High School in Detroit

Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution

Dr. King delivers the commencement address at Oberlin College in Ohio on June 14, 1965. Nothing is more tragic, he says, than sleeping through a significant period of social change by failing to adopt the new mental attitudes that the new situation demands. He suggests that to remain awake through a great revolution one must embrace a global perspective and work for peace, racial justice, economic justice and brotherhood throughout the world.

Remarks by MLK at the Freedom House Annual Dinner

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for being honored by Freedom House. He also pays tribute to the life and work of John F. Kennedy while encourging others to honor his memory through their dedication to civil rights.

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